history
The Sea Equivalent of Time Team Thinks it’s Found HMS Endeavour

HMS Endeavour, Captain James Cook's old boat that he famously used to discover a few places that already existed, has apparently been found after spending nearly 250 years lost at the bottom of the sea. Read More >>

history
Kids From the 1970s Had Some Adorable Ideas for the Year 1999

Did you ever imagine what the future would be like when you were a kid? We all did. Some of us were obsessed with jetpacks and robots, while others dreamed of videophones and space travel. It was “all of the above” for two kids in Reynoldsville in the US state of Pennsylvania, who imagined what the futuristic world of 1999 would look like in 1975. Read More >>

archaeology
Ancient Jar of Roman Gold Coins Discovered Under Italian Theatre

Archaeologists unearthed a pot of gold coins dating back to the 5th century AD under an abandoned theatre near Milan, Italy. Read More >>

history
The Story of the American Inventor Denied a Patent Because He Was a Slave

The world of invention is famous for its patent disputes. But what happens when your dispute wasn’t with another inventor but whether the Patent Office saw you as a person at all? In 1864, a black man named Benjamin T. Montgomery tried to patent his new propeller for steamboats. The US Patent Office said that he wasn’t allowed to patent his invention. All because he was enslaved. Read More >>

disasters
Flames Engulf Brazil’s National Museum, Destroying Massive Cultural and Scientific Collection

11,000 years’ worth of artefacts went up in smoke as the 200-year-old National Museum of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro—one of the largest collections in the Americas—burned down in a massive firestorm early this morning. Read More >>

technology
Here’s How Historians Are Making Sure Emails Will Last Forever

Your emails contain the kind of information modern-day historians can only dream about. To find anything about the past, historians usually have to descend into dusty archives, searching through scraps of paper, old letters, documents and diaries, in the desperate hope they can shed some light on things that happened long ago. Much of history — such as the history of anybody who wasn’t rich, royalty, world leaders, influential thinkers, or dangerous criminals (often all at once) — is even more difficult to find; the ordinary folk didn’t leave much behind. Read More >>

environment
What Ancient Mayan Forests Can Tell Us About Our Future

More than 3,000 years ago, ancient Mayans spread across the Yucatán Peninsula and neighbouring areas, clearing rainforest for agriculture and cities as they went. Though their civilisation mysteriously collapsed around the ninth century, it left an indelible mark on the region’s tropical rainforests, one that presents a warning to people clear-cutting the tropics today. Read More >>

science
Section of U.S. Warship From WWII Discovered Off Alaskan Coast

In August 1943, the USS Abner Read struck a Japanese naval mine while conducting patrols in the Bering Sea. The explosion sheared the ship’s entire stern section, sending it and 71 U.S. sailors to the bottom of the Bering Sea. Lost for 75 years, the World War II destroyer’s severed stern has finally been found off a remote Alaskan island. Read More >>

phones
The 1950s Guide to Proper Telephone Etiquette

Phone calls here in 2018 seem to be more and more rare, especially with younger people. But most folks still know basic phone etiquette, like saying “hello” when you answer the phone, and not hanging up without some kind of goodbye. But in case you’ve forgotten, here’s a helpful guide from 1950 that was produced by a phone company—complete with some silly retro advice. Read More >>

music
Rod Stewart Finally Embarrassed by Leopard Skin Chair at Age 73

Rod Stewart's having a clear out of all the trappings of fame he's acquired over the past innumerable, interminable decades, with a local auction house about to shift a load of his unwanted classic and more gaudy modern furniture items, as he's moving house. Read More >>

science
New Evidence Contradicts Theory That Easter Island Society Collapsed

The indigenous people of Easter Island, the Rapa Nui, experienced a societal collapse after the 17th century because they stripped the island clean of its natural resources. Or at least, that’s the leading theory. An analysis of the tools used by the Rapa Nui to build their iconic stone statues suggests a very different conclusion, pointing to the presence of a highly organised and cohesive society. Read More >>

history
Thomas Edison Predicted Nobody Would Be Able to Make Phone Calls Across the Atlantic Ocean

Never say never. Thomas Edison was both a great inventor and an amusing prognosticator. But nobody, no matter how smart, knows the future. And that goes for Edison as well. Back in 1894, Edison predicted that transatlantic phone calls would be impossible. But his doubts would prove silly roughly 30 years later when the first transatlantic phone call was completed in 1927. Read More >>

history
Comic From 1913 Predicted Innovations for Newspapers of the Future

A lot of things were supposed to kill newspapers in the 20th century. There was radio, then TV, then the internet. Somehow newspapers have survived, in one form or another. But it’s still interesting to take a look at the predictions that people of yesterday had for how the news business would change. Like this comic strip from 1913 about the newspaper of tomorrow. Read More >>

nuclear war
The Futuristic Invisible Wall That Was Supposed to Protect Entire Towns From Missiles in 1959

When you hear about the concept of missile defence in space, your first thought might be Ronald Reagan’s Strategic Defense Initiative, more commonly called Star Wars. But ideas for an invisible missile shield in the sky are much older than the 1980s. As just one example, we have this Sunday comic strip from 1959, which imagined the missile defences of the future. Read More >>