biotechnology
Experimental Weekly Pill Could Make HIV Treatment a Lot Easier to Swallow

The current slate of treatments for HIV have been nothing short of life-saving. These antiretroviral therapy (ART) drugs, as they’re known, keep people with HIV healthy and virtually virus-free, with relatively minor side effects—so long as they take the pills daily. The biggest reason why some people can’t keep up with daily treatment is access: Many people, particularly in poorer areas of the world, simply can’t afford a lifetime supply. But there’s also a problem of adherence—as much as 30 percent of people can’t stick to the needed daily regimen of ART. To help remedy this commitment gap, researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard Medical School have created a tiny star-shaped cargo container, packed inside a gel capsule, they hope can parse out a week’s supply of ART with one dose. Read More >>

science
Why Has Science Only Cured One Person of HIV?

In 2007, a young American man living in Berlin became a marvel of modern medicine when, 12 years after he was diagnosed with HIV, the virus suddenly disappeared from his body. Timothy Ray Brown had been diagnosed with leukemia and received a stem cell transplant treat it. His stem cell donor, it turned out, had a rare genetic mutation known as CCR5-delta 32 that gave Brown resistance to HIV infection. Brown became known as “the Berlin patient.” Ten years later, he is still the only person to have ever been cured of HIV. Read More >>

health
Certain Penis-Dwelling Bacteria Might Increase Your HIV Risk

HIV transmission is a complex process with factors beyond just who you sleep with and how. The virus ultimately needs to find its way to the correct kinds of cells in order to wreak havoc. And some of the risk, at least for those with penises, may come from the kinds of bacteria on the tip. Read More >>

medicine
This USB Stick Performs an HIV Test

Scientists here in the UK have developed a USB stick that can quickly and accurately measure the amount of HIV is in a patient’s blood. Read More >>

science
We Were Wrong About HIV’s ‘Patient Zero’ 

The origin of the AIDS pandemic has been reconstructed in unprecedented detail, showing the disease jumped from the Caribbean to New York City around 1970. The study subsequently clears the name of Gaétan Dugas, a French-Canadian flight attendant long-thought to be “Patient Zero.” Read More >>

science
British Man May Be the First Person Cured of HIV

A 44-year-old man in England is possibly the first person in history to be cured of HIV. Scientists working on an experimental new therapy say that the virus is now completely undetectable in his blood. Read More >>

health
What is PrEP, the Controversial HIV Drug?

A High Court judge is about to deliver a ruling on the use of HIV drug PrEP, the not-far-off-a-miracle drug that can reduce transmission of HIV by up to 90 per cent in those taking it. For a cost to the NHS of around £400 a month. Read More >>

medicine
HIV Can Adapt to Gene-Editing Attacks

Scientists are excited about the prospect of using CRISPR, a powerful gene-editing tool, to combat HIV. A discouraging follow-up study shows that HIV is capable of developing a resistance to the genetic attack—but scientists say CRISPR’s battle with HIV is far from over. Read More >>

medicine
Doctors Successfully Transplant HIV-Infected Organs in the US For the First Time

Physicians from Johns Hopkins Medicine have performed two landmark organ transplantations involving an HIV-positive liver and kidney. It’s a historic precedent that will do much to alleviate the ongoing organ shortage, while paving the way towards similar transplants involving other diseases. Read More >>

medicine
HIV Successfully Edited Out of Immune Cells

Researchers from Temple University have used the CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing tool to clear out the entire HIV-1 genome from a patient’s infected immune cells. It’s a remarkable achievement that could have profound implications for the treatment of AIDS and other retroviruses. Read More >>

medicine
This Simple Vaginal Ring Can Reduce the Risk of HIV Infection

This plain-looking silicone ring is rather more useful than it looks. Doped with an experimental antiretroviral drug, when worn in the vagina by women in sub-Saharan Africa it was shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection by as much as 61 per cent. Read More >>

health
The Deadly Legacy of HIV Truthers

AIDS was a terrifying mystery, and then we solved it. When researchers identified the human immunodeficiency virus as the reason why young, previously healthy people were developing rare cancers and wasting away, it was a triumph of medical science. Read More >>

science
HIV Could Be Killing Cells in a Way Scientists Had So Far Not Noticed

Scientists have been conscientiously studying HIV for decades, but now a new study suggests that the virus can infect and kill immune cells in a way that scientists have so far overlooked. Read More >>