science
Cautious Optimism as Scientists Grow Human Eggs From Immature Cells in the Lab

In a scientific first, researchers from the UK and US have taken early-stage human egg cells and grown them to full maturity in the lab. It’s an important proof-of-concept that could eventually yield new infertility treatments for women. Read More >>

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A Baby Conceived in 1992 Was Born Just Last Month

Wrap your head around this one: On November 25, 2017 a healthy baby girl was born to a 26-year-old mother in Tennessee—but the embryo that would later result in the baby was conceived and cryogenically frozen in 1992. It’s now considered the oldest known frozen embryo to result in a successful birth. Read More >>

science
This Star Wars-Inspired Simulation of Human Reproduction Is Awesome

The microscopic processes involved in human fertilization are a difficult thing to convey visually, but a group of scientists, using Star Wars as their inspiration, have managed to do just that, creating a highly entertaining and informative video—while accidentally stumbling upon a new scientific discovery in the process. Read More >>

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Sperm Counts Have Plummeted Among Western Men, Scientists Confirm

Something weird is going on with human sperm production. For decades, scientists have warned that sperm counts are dropping among Western men, but no one has really been able to prove it. In what is now the largest and most comprehensive study of its kind, scientists have presented compelling evidence in support of this rather alarming assertion, showing that sperm counts have dropped more than 50 percent in just four decades. Read More >>

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The Older You Get, the More Likely it is You’ll Have Mutated ‘Selfish’ Sperm Cells

It’s well established that older men are more likely to pass on a genetic disorder to their offspring, but we’re learning more about why this happens: as men age, their sperm mutates more frequently. This is potentially bad news for men who want to have children later in life. Read More >>

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Researchers Can Now Grow Fallopian Tubes in the Lab

Researchers in Germany have grown in a lab the innermost layer of human fallopian tubes. The new technique is offering fresh insights into this essential component of the female reproductive system, while also hinting at potential new directions for the treatment of various reproductive disorders. Read More >>