science
You Know About Flu Season, but Did You Know About Gonorrhoea Season?

Like clockwork, the influenza virus rears its ugly head every winter and makes our lives miserable. But the flu isn’t the only germ that likes a particular time of year, according to a new paper published this week in PLOS Pathogens. Seemingly every infectious disease, including polio, gonorrhoea, and even HIV, is seasonal, though not always for the same reasons. Read More >>

science
Scientists Think They Can Use Silver to Help Kill Brain-Eating Amoebas

In folklore and movies, silver is often one of the best tools against terrifying monsters like vampires and werewolves. But a recent study seems to show that silver could help defeat some real-life horrors, too. Silver nanoparticles loaded with common anti-seizure drugs might be able to safely and effectively treat brain-eating infections caused by amoebas, the study found. Read More >>

health
US Experts Are Being Kept Away From the Front Lines of the Latest Ebola Outbreak

The latest outbreak of Ebola virus disease to hit the Democratic Republic of Congo is only getting worse. But the US government has pulled its experts from the affected areas of the African country in recent weeks, citing safety concerns. Read More >>

news
Quarantined Passengers on Flight From Dubai Were Sick With the Flu and Common Cold: Officials

The initially mysterious illness that prompted Emirates Airlines Flight 203 to be quarantined upon its arrival to JFK International Airport in New York Wednesday is likely just a bad case of the flu and cold, health officials said Thursday. Read More >>

science
Superbugs That Cause UTIs Are Spreading Outside of Hospitals

The bacteria that cause urinary tract infections are not only becoming more resistant to antibiotics, suggests a recent study published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine, but they’re starting to spread outside of hospitals. Even worse than that, doctors might be losing their ability to predict when someone has a superbug, raising the chances of treating them with useless drugs that will further promote resistance. Read More >>

science
Hand Sanitisers Are Becoming Less Effective Against Some Hospital Superbugs

Bacteria are steadily winning the war against even our strongest antibiotics, stoking fears of a future that resembles Victorian-era England in all the worst ways. A new study published Wednesday in Science Translational Medicine is sure to add to this existential terror: It suggests that at least some hospital-spread bugs are also starting to fend off alcohol-based disinfectants. Read More >>

health
Raw Turkey Is Spreading Superbug Salmonella

Getting a stomach bug is bad enough. But a new outbreak of salmonella bacteria spread by raw turkey that has sickened nearly 100 people across several US states has a troubling wrinkle to it: The germ at fault is likely also resistant to multiple antibiotics. Read More >>

science
Yet More Evidence that Viruses May Cause Alzheimer’s Disease

For decades, the idea that a bacteria or virus could help cause Alzheimer’s disease was dismissed as a fringe theory. But not so much anymore. On Wednesday, a team of researchers from Harvard Medical School reported in the journal Neuron the latest bit of evidence suggesting herpesviruses can spark the cascade of events that leads to Alzheimer’s disease, a fatal form of dementia that afflicts at least 5 million Americans. Read More >>

health
Hospital Evacuated After Tuberculosis Sample Accidentally Released

One of the world’s deadliest diseases — tuberculosis — made a rare stateside appearance Thursday. This afternoon, the Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland reported that a small amount of the infectious germ was potentially released in its facilities while being transported. The incident initially prompted the evacuation of several buildings, but hospital officials now say no one is at risk of contracting the disease. Read More >>

wtf
This Woman’s Horrifying Selfies Helped Track the Parasitic Worm Crawling in Her Face

A woman’s selfies helped her monitor the movements of an unwelcome guest: a roving parasitic worm living in her face. Thankfully, doctors were able to get the pesky pest — which she likely caught overseas from a mosquito — out of her body without any problems. Read More >>

science
Oh Joy, We Just Found Another Virus Spread By Mosquitoes That Might Make Us Sick

A mosquito-borne virus discovered over a half century ago has been found in humans for the first time ever, likely having caused a case of severe rash and fever in an American teenager in 2016. But despite the recent reveal, it’s likely the germ has been making people sick for quite some time. Read More >>

science
What Is Nipah, the Virus Spread by Bats That’s Killing People in India?

A deadly viral disease spread by bats is once again infecting humans, but in this case, it isn’t Ebola. As of 1 June, an outbreak of the Nipah virus has infected at least 18 people and killed 17 in Kerala, India, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported. The outbreak, which is the first to hit South India, raises fears of the disease becoming more far-reaching. Read More >>

science
One Study Finds ‘Zombie Deer’ Prion Disease May Not Infect Humans, but Risk Remains

Scientists’ worst fears over a so-called “zombie deer” prion disease currently spreading across the US and Canada are unlikely to come to pass, suggests a long-term study published last week in the Journal of Virology. The fatal ailment, known as chronic wasting disease (CWD) and caused by a mysterious kind of protein called a prion, doesn’t seem capable of crossing the species barrier and spreading to humans—at least according to this experiment. Other research, however, has found otherwise. Read More >>

science
How a Virus Spreads Through an Aeroplane Cabin

Travelling by plane greatly increases our chances of getting sick, or so many of us are wont to believe. To be fair, it’s not uncommon to come down with a nasty illness after we return from a vacation or business trip. But is flying the culprit? The latest research suggests the answer is no—but much of it depends on where we sit. Read More >>

medicine
Thousands of UK Teens Will Help Settle a Vaccine Debate Over Meningitis 

Scientists in the UK are looking to recruit thousands of teens (presumably with attitude) to help them settle a debate over whether vaccines for a certain type of meningitis should be in wider use. Read More >>