insects
Experts Trigger Spider Invasion Panic

Experts are throwing the nation into a panic again, this time warning that some sort of mass spider invasion is under way. 150 million of them are coming, they say, as they head into houses to have sex with each other in our fruit bowls. That's why your bananas have brown patches on them in the morning. Read More >>

science
Killer Ants Snap Their Spring-Loaded Jaws 700 Times Faster Than You Can Blink

Below the tangle of vines and branches of the East Malaysian rainforest, a small contingent of ants scuttles frenetically along the shaded leaf litter. But these are no mere picnic pests — these are Myrmoteras trap-jaw ants, fearsome predators armed with long, spiky, widely-agape mandibles — and they are on the hunt. Suddenly, an insect-like springtail comes into the view of a trap-jaw’s compound eye. With a quick rush from the ant, it’s all over, and the springtail is pitifully pinned in the ant’s prickly jaws. Read More >>

health
Mosquito Horror at Ashford International Truck Stop

An outbreak of foreign mosquitos was discovered at a service station in Kent, with authorities suggesting that one lone female mosquito may have sneaked across the channel in a vehicle and launched a brave solo attempt at populating the country with its offspring. Read More >>

animals
Some Bees Hate Being Around Other Stupid Bees

Scientists looking at bees for something to do have found a subset of the group that appear to hate interacting with other bees, suggesting that these unusually antisocial bees have a similar genetic profile to people who suffer from disorders on the autism spectrum. Read More >>

science
New Technique Creates Stunning 3D Images of Live Insects

When taking high-resolution 3D scans of insects, scientists typically have to kill their test subjects, which isn’t always ideal. By taking advantage of an insect’s ability to survive oxygen-poor conditions, scientists have now used carbon dioxide to keep bugs in a state of suspended animation for upwards of seven hours at a time—and with no apparent side effects. Read More >>

science
How the Dragonfly’s Surprisingly Complex Brain Makes it a Deadly Hunter

Like a baseball player running to make a catch, dragonflies are also capable of predicting the trajectory of a moving object, typically its next meal. New research is revealing the mechanisms behind this complex cognitive task, which was once thought to be exclusive to mammals. It’s hoped that these insights will lead to innovations in robot vision. Read More >>

science
Praying Mantises are More Badass Than We Realised

Praying mantises are among the most frightening insects on the planet, equipped with powerful front legs which they use to snatch unwary insects, spiders, and even the odd amphibian or reptile. But as new research reveals, praying mantises are also proficient at capturing birds — which they do more often than we thought. Read More >>

spiders
This Thumbnail-Sized Spider Shoots an 80-Foot-Long Web Bridge to Cross Rivers

If Marvel’s Spider-Man always seemed a little too far-fetched, you’re going to have an even harder time wrapping your head around the Darwin’s Bark spider. It’s no bigger than a thumbnail, but it can shoot a web at distances of over 80 feet, allowing it to cross rivers and spin massive traps. Read More >>

giz asks
Do Insects Enjoy Sex?

As species, we have little in common with bees, fruit flies and beetles. Bugs are so alien to us that it’s hard to know how exactly they experience the world. Do they feel pain? Do they experience pleasure? What is sex like for them? Do they enjoy it in any way—physical or otherwise? Read More >>

insects
Have You Seen 24,000 Bees?

A posh country estate in South Yorkshire has been the victim of a crime, and it's a particularly unusual case. It involves the theft of 24,000 bees from the gardens of Hooton Pagnell Hall. Read More >>

science
These Ants Do a Lion King-Like Ritual But With Chemicals

Based on the popular Disney film The Lion King, I assume identifying lion royalty is fairly easy. After all, an elder baboon, Rafiki presented the young lion prince Simba to the entirety of the animal kingdom from atop Pride Rock during some ceremony yet-to-be-observed by humans. But how do the ants know who’s going to be their next monarch? Read More >>

food
ASDA Banana Spiders Force House Evacuation

That thing about deadly overseas spiders getting in the bananas and coming over here to panic the nation? It's happened again. It's happened to some poor woman in County Durham who had to get out of the house while Spiderbusters came in and nuked the place. Read More >>

science
Adorable Couple Donates Their £8 Million Insect Collection To Science

Lois and Charles O'Brien are both in their 80s. They met at the University of Arizona in the 1950s, "brought together by insects", according to Charles in an interview with The Guardian. They're big on bugs—enough to have collected more than a million insects, a collection worth $10 million (£8 million), according to Nico Franz, an entomologist at Arizona State University, where the insects are now being kept. Read More >>

science
Yet Another Reason Honey Bees Are Screwed: Your Damn Almonds

It’s no secret that bees have been having a really rough time: Just yesterday, the rusty-patched bumble became the first bee in the continental United States officially listed under the Endangered Species Act. But that’s the tip of the iceberg for our buzzy little friends, who unlike their asshole cousins—wasps—only want to pollinate plants with their fuzzy little bodies. Sadly, the best bees, honey bees (Apis mellifera L.), are dealing with yet another threat to their existence, while wasps just sit back and watch the world burn. Read More >>