gadgets
The Never-Ending Death of Smart Home Gadgets

I got my smart TV in early November 2016. It was a 50-inch Samsung – the largest size I could convince my then skeptical roommate to shell out for. We scored a modest deal. At roughly £500 split between two poor millennials, it wasn’t too bad. (Though, in retrospect, I should have waited until Black Friday.) It was, and I mean this in the most generous of terms, okay. The picture quality was fine. The apps all worked. Screencasting was sometimes choppy but altogether fine. And then last year, I moved. Read More >>

privacy
This App Tells You When Nearby Smart Devices Are Snooping on You

The devices we use every day are increasingly voice-controlled or internet-connected, even if they probably shouldn’t be. If you’re also one of those folks that’s morbidly curious about which of these devices are hiding behind bullshit privacy policies to collect reams of data on you, there’s now a handy app for that. Read More >>

security
New Phillips Hue Smart Light Hack Uses Old Chain Reaction Vulnerability

The Internet of Things is full of insecure and somewhat dubious gadgets, but Philips Hue has generally had a decent reputation – a big reason why it’s one of the more popular brands in the space. However, researchers from Check Point Software have found that an already-known vulnerability with Hue lightbulbs could still be exploited to take control over your home or corporate network. Read More >>

alexa
Amazon Quietly Reveals Plan to Put Alexa in Almost Everything

Just when you thought Alexa wasn’t integrated into enough stuff, Amazon has casually announced a new way to add the artificially intelligent voice assistant to even the cheapest, dumbest things. The new technology is capable of running Alexa with the most basic processors and less than 1MB of memory. That means you might soon mean your light switches, your toaster, and even your toothbrush might start listening to you. Read More >>

internet
What Would Happen If the Whole Internet Just Shut Down All of a Sudden?

A world in which the internet suddenly stops: surely the TV show’s already in development. Sprawling cast, gorgeous visuals, tediously on-the-nose themes. Some handsome B-lister tearing around the country in pursuit of his wayward kids, or the shadowy sect that pulled the plug in the first place. A patch of prairie in Kansas with a weak but functional signal, people lining for miles to check texts, riots breaking out. Thankfully, we don’t have to wait for this show to be shot and streamed to get a decent idea of what the internet apocalypse might look like: for this week’s Giz Asks, we asked a number of experts to do the imagining for us. Read More >>

smart home
How Many of Your Smart Gadgets Can Actually Get a Virus?

You might have noticed the brouhaha over the since-deleted Samsung tweet advising users to run antivirus scans on their smart TVs—but is such a malware attack possible? Just how many of your smart home gadgets are vulnerable to viruses in the same way that your laptop might be? We called in the experts to find out. Read More >>

google
Google Should Make Two-Factor Authentication the Default on Nest Cameras

It took a growing mountain of home hacking horror stories going viral, but Google on Wednesday finally took action by telling their customers to stop messing everything up. Read More >>

google
A Google Engineer Discovered a Vulnerability Letting Him Take Control of Keycard-Controlled Doors

A Google engineer discovered a vulnerability in the third-party system controlling access to doors across its campus in Sunnyvale, California, and took the opportunity to prove that he could bypass any RFID keycard-operated lock in the facility, Forbes reported on Monday. Read More >>

technology
There’s a New Resource List for Domestic Abuse Victims Targeted Through the Internet of Things

Last month, the New York Times published a report detailing ways in which domestic abusers have weaponised smart home technology, exploiting devices such as internet-connected doorbells, speakers, and thermostats to harass their partners. This month, a research team at University College London published a resource list for victims of domestic abuse, specifically through the exploitation of the internet of things. Read More >>

security
Smart Home Security Camera Sends Footage to Wrong Person, Is Maybe Not So Smart After All

Internet-connected devices are known for having their fair share of security issues — especially when it comes to cameras. But here’s a new one: the BBC reported this week that a smart home security camera started sending video clips to the wrong person. Read More >>

giz asks
Is the VR Universe in Ready Player One Possible?

In 2018, nearly everything is in place for a descent into a Ready Player One-style dystopia. The way things are going, we should be destitute and beaten down by climate change long before the 2040s. All we’re missing, for now, is the technology. People are already more than happy to spend huge percentages of their lives hooked up to alternate realities (social media, MMO games, binged television) but these are all rudimentary compared to Ready Player One’s immersive, hyper-lifelike OASIS VR universe. Those looking to escape the grim, cash-squeezed drudgery of day-to-day life through fully-immersive VR will have to wait, for now, until someone invents a way to get 75% of the country’s population on the same platform. Read More >>

privacy
Your Smart Home Is Spying on You. Here’s How to Spy Back.

After Gizmodo’s investigation into the data smart homes expose about our lives, many of you asked how you could monitor the digital emissions from your own homes. Well, you’re in luck. Read More >>

rant
Less Internet, Please

Remember when surfing the web was a treat? A delicacy, almost. You’d fire up the whatever-kilobaud modem and start the pay-per-minute meter running and read about politics or whatever. A fun time. That’s no longer the case, and I’m honestly rotting from overexposure to the online. Read More >>

science
The History of Wireless Everything

Halfway between Brooklyn and Montauk, a steel cupola propped up on wooden legs once looked out over the Long Island Sound and beyond the horizon. Built in the first years of the 20th century, Wardenclyffe Tower served as the centrepiece of a real-life mad scientist’s laboratory. Lever pulling, lightning bolts, maniacal laughter—this is where that sort of thing was supposed to happen. And it almost did. Read More >>