space
Asteroid Mining Might Just Work—If Only We Can Land on the Dang Things

The Rosetta mission’s Philae lander descended toward the two-and-a-half-mile-wide comet at a human’s walking pace. For seven tense hours, scientists in Darmstadt, Germany monitored its radio signal. They would have no idea whether they’d done everything correctly until after the moment of touchdown. If all went well, the lander would press two harpoons into the dusty surface of 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko, sticking itself firmly in place. If not, well, Philae could bounce right off and be lost to space, or it could be sucked into a pit of soft dust. Read More >>

space
Hell Yes, Japan’s Hayabusa2 Spacecraft Has Officially Entered Orbit Around the Ryugu Asteroid

After nearly four years of travelling through space, the Hayabusa2 spacecraft has successfully rendezvoused with the Ryugu asteroid, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency confirmed Wednesday. Let the next stage of this historic sampling-and-return mission begin! Read More >>

space
Fantastic New View of Ryugu Asteroid Reveals a Distinctly Dice-Like Shape

The Hayabusa 2 spacecraft‘s latest photo of the Ryugu asteroid, taken from a distance of just 25 miles (40 km), shows for the first time surface features like boulders and craters, in addition to revealing the object’s unique dice-like appearance. Read More >>

space
Japan Forced to Shut Down Two Cameras on Venus Probe

Following an unexpected energy surge, Japan’s space agency has hit the pause button on two of the five cameras aboard its Venus-orbiting Akatsuki spacecraft. It’s a bad sign for the troubled orbiter, which has been exposed to more radiation than anticipated. Read More >>

space
A Japanese Effort to Remove Hazardous Space Junk Has Failed

An experimental Japanese mission to remove dangerous debris from orbit has ended in failure. It’s a frustrating setback given the mounting risks posed by the nearly two million bits of junk currently swirling around our planet. Read More >>

space
We Finally Know What Happened to Japan’s Lost Black Hole Satellite

After a full month spinning out of control in space, Japan’s Space Agency has finally figured out how it lost control of Hitomi, a very expensive satellite that was hunting for black holes. This also means the agency will never get it back. Read More >>

space
Japan’s Lost Black Hole Satellite Just Reappeared and Nobody Knows What Happened to It 

Earlier this week something happened to make Japan’s brand new Hitomi black hole satellite suddenly, mysteriously lose all contact with Earth. Now, we have video of it spinning wildly in space — and JAXA has also received a few odd, new messages. Read More >>

space
No One Knows What Happened to Japan’s Lost £166 Million Black Hole Satellite

Last month, Japan launched a satellite it described as “essential” to unlocking the mysteries of the universe. This weekend, that £166 million satellite mysteriously disappeared, leaving behind only an ominous trail of debris and some cryptic messages behind. Read More >>

space
Start Your Day With a Replay of Today’s Japanese Spacecraft Launch

At around 1pm BST this afternoon, Japan successfully launched an unmanned cargo vehicle, bound for the ISS. And man, watching spacecraft take off never gets old. Read More >>

space
Japan Plans to Explore Martian Moons With Asteroid-Probing Tech

Countries are scrambling to get to Mars in a good ol’ fashioned space race. But focus might be shifting to the red planet’s two moons. According to reports, Japan announced plans yesterday to bring its asteroid-probing technology to the tiny Martian satellites. Read More >>

energy
Japan’s Space Team Plans Orbital Solar Plant for 2030

Japan's JAXA space authority is now seriously investing time in the sci-fi concept of the orbital solar array, announcing a plan that could eventually culminate in a 1-gigawatt space solar relay being in place by the 2030s. Read More >>

space
This Japanese Rocket Launch Looks Like an Early Atomic Bomb Test

This stunning image shows the launch of the Japanese H-IIA rocket as it carries the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory into space. The rocket thundered into the sky at 1:37 p.m. EST on Thursday February 27th and this image was, unsurprisingly, captured by NASA photographer Bill Ingalls. Read More >>

space
Japan’s Launching a Giant Net Into Orbit to Scoop Up Space Junk

Something must be done to deal with the estimated 100 million bits of man made space junk circling the planet, and Japan is taking the lead. But can we do? Shoot it with a laser? Invent Wall-E-like robots to collect it? Nah… let's just blast a big net into space. Read More >>

space
Japan’s Rocket Launch Was Totally On The Cheap

On Saturday the Japanese space agency Jaxa successfully launched the Epsilon rocket, which is carrying a telescope, Sprint-A, for planetary observation. Jaxa was able to complete the launch for about £23.2 million, half the cost of previous Jaxa rockets and cheap compared to an average £285 million NASA launch. Read More >>