facebook
Facebook’s Pretty Sure It Won’t Mess Up the News This Time

On Friday, Facebook started tests of what seems like its umpteenth attempt at handling journalism on the platform – a dedicated Facebook News section for users that lives separately from the standard News Feed on its mobile app and licenses content from the outlets writing it. Read More >>

marvel comics
The Daily Bugle is on the Hunt for a Major Scoop in its Very Own Comic Book

Two-thousand nineteen: A bad year for the media, by and large. Venture capitalists running amok, local news structures being torn apart and shut down, institutions being reshaped and ruined by the influence of massive tech companies like Facebook and Google. That’s the real world, at least. In superhero comics? It’s never been a better time, apparently. Read More >>

snapchat
Snapchat is Once Again Pivoting Back to News

Snap, parent company of Snapchat, is trying to do the whole 'social media platform tries to lure journalistic outfits into producing content for them' thing again, per a report in the Information on Tuesday. Read More >>

elon musk
Elon Musk Might Be Buying New Scientist

We may have just found the solution to the journalism crisis, people: Elon Musk! Read More >>

apple
Report: Apple Is Trying to Get Newspapers to Fork Over Half of Revenue From Planned Subscription Service

Tech giant Apple, which is trying to pivot to services as sales of some of its electronics slow, is reportedly working to launch a subscription-based news service that would get readers past paywalls and share the revenues with publishers. But according to a Tuesday report in the Wall Street Journal, many of those publishers aren’t thrilled with those terms – especially because Apple wants half. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Is Paying Millions To Train Local UK Journalists

In a move that is definitely not intended to make the UK media see Facebook more sympathetically, the social networking giant has pledged $6m (about £4,675,000) to train up local journalists in the UK. Read More >>

facebook
Advertisers Suing Facebook Allege It May Have Committed Fraud on Video Ad Metrics

A group of advertisers suing social-media giant Facebook in California over bungled video metrics now alleges in court filings that the platform failed to disclose data errors in a manner that could “[rise] to the level of fraud and may warrant punitive damages,” according to Ars Technica. Read More >>

politics
How Would Jeremy Corbyn’s Plan To Tax Big Tech Actually Work?

It turns out that when Jeremy Corbyn isn’t busy being present but not participating in wreath-layings with dodgy characters, he likes to spend time thinking not about wreaths, but Reithian values. Read More >>

twitter
Here Is Your Warning That Fake Twitter Followers Are Now a Thing With Consequences

This weekend, the New York Times published an in-depth report on the online market in social media identity theft and fraud, including a list of precisely which celebrities are (stunner!) inflating their online followings with overpriced bots. Film critic Richard Roeper—once co-host of At the Movies with Roger Ebert—happened to be one of a long list of names in the piece, alongside people like actor John Leguizamo, former Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis, and even Twitter board member Martha Lane Fox. Read More >>

google
Google’s New App Asks Random People to Start Writing the News

Google has quietly launched a pilot for a news app that it says will “put a spotlight on inspiring stories that aren’t being told.” Out this week via a limited pilot in a couple of US cities, Bulletin is essentially a public, shared blog space that doesn’t require any expertise on content management systems, HTML, or even an app download. Google hopes it will help users tell “hyperlocal” stories. Read More >>

twitter
Bloomberg is Starting a “24-Hour Social News Network” Based on Twitter

Twitter has not exactly survived the last few months with a sterling reputation, in between continued controversy over its failure to adequately address rampant harassment, allegations it sold political ads to Russian foreign agents, and most recently news it had verified the account of neo-Nazi Charlottesville organiser Jason Kessler. Then there’s Twitter’s, uh, presidential problem, which may technically be good for the company’s traffic but creates a host of other problems with no signs of ebbing in the near future. Read More >>

youtube
Journalist Nearly Banned From YouTube and Gmail For Posting Al-Qaeda Videos From Chelsea Manning Trial

YouTube’s latest push to ban terrorist propaganda across its ubiquitous video platform is getting off to a rough start. Earlier this week, noted investigative reporter and researcher Alexa O’Brien woke to find that not only had she been permanently banned from YouTube, but that her Gmail and Google Drive accounts had been suspended as well. She would later learn that a reviewer who works for Google had mistakenly identified her channel, in the words of a YouTube representative, as “being dedicated to terrorist propaganda.” Read More >>

social media
Tweet for the Queen, and £30k a Year

If you think you can grit your teeth hard enough to say nice things about the monarchy all day, here's a nice job -- a temporary Digital Communications Officer on behalf of the royal lot. You get £30k a year for blogging about matters to do with royalty and news about royalty, while keeping your political feelings to nothing more than occasionally spelling out rude words using the first letter of each paragraph. Read More >>

google
Forget Facebook’s Fake News Problem, Google’s Rich Snippets Are The Fourth Estate’s Real Problem

Whatever your feelings on the upcoming 45th President of the United States, Donald Trump’s election win has generated an unprecedented amount of soul-searching and analysis, as the Western world seeks desperately to try and understand how he was able to transform his fringe candidacy into one of the most powerful populist movements of the 21st century. Read More >>

virtual reality
8 Ways Virtual Reality Is For More Than Just Video Games

Virtual reality, a dream of science fiction writers for decades, is the closest to a true reality than it’s ever been. Multiple headsets are on sale to consumers, and while some aren’t exactly affordable to the common person, such as the HTC Vive or the Oculus Rift, and others work better than the rest, the upcoming years will only bring more innovation to the industry. Read More >>