architecture
At Scotland’s Crawick Multiverse Garden, You Can Look into the Void

Have you ever wanted to meander between two spiral galaxies, or follow in the footsteps of a comet? Now visitors to Scotland’s Nith Valley can do just that. Welcome to the “Crawick Multiverse,” a massive installation created by renowned landscape architect Charles Jencks that gives symbolic physical form to some of our most abstract physics theories. Read More >>

photography
Amazing Aerial Photos of Greenhouses Blanketing the Spanish Landscape

The area in southern Spain known as mar del plástico is a landscape dominated by vast stretches of greenhouse farms. From the ground, it looks like nothing but roads winding through a maze of covered crops. But when seen from the air in German photographer Bernhard Lang's images, things look a bit more surreal. Read More >>

art
See an Entire Muddy River Bed Transplanted Inside an Art Museum

If you've ever been to the Louisiana Museum in Denmark, you know it's one of the most dramatic museum locations around: perched on a rocky cliff above Øresund, looking out over the ocean, it's easy to find yourself staring out to sea instead of at the art. Now, Olafur Eliasson has brought the landscape inside the museum. Read More >>

environment
How Underground Fires Helped Shape the Landscape of the American West

The most famous coal seam fire smoulders underneath Centralia, Pennsylvania, but thousands of such underground fires burn all over the world. In the American West, where subterranean coal still burn, ancient conflagrations created the red-inflected landscape we see today. Read More >>

collection
These Landscapes Covered in Oil Wells are Like Huge Alien Cities

Crude oil—or petroleum—has been used since ancient times for several purposes, mostly for dimly lighting up buildings and streets. Only after inventing the fractional distillation of oil and discovering vast mineral oil fields under the ground and sea in the 19th and 20th centuries, petroleum became the most important material for the modern nations, who could fuel all their cars, airplanes, boats—and, of course, tanks, bombers, and warships that helped make the world safe for more oil consumption. Read More >>

military
A Pyramid in the Middle of Nowhere Built to Track the End of the World

A huge pyramid in the middle of nowhere tracking the end of the world on radar, just an abstract geometric shape beneath the sky without a human being in sight: it could be the opening scene of an apocalyptic science fiction film, but it's just the US military going about its business, building vast and other-worldly architectural structures that the civilian world only rarely sees. Read More >>

aircraft
How Will Search & Rescue Work if a Plane Goes Down in the Arctic?

It has been nearly a month since Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared from radar, and its ultimate whereabouts remain unclear. The complex international effort of searching for the plane in a remote stretch of the South Indian Ocean raises the question of what would happen if a plane were to go down in the Arctic: who would coordinate the necessary search and rescue teams, and where should they be based? Geographer Mia Bennett tried to answer this question on her blog, Cryopolitics. Read More >>

art
The Gorgeous Tics and Errors of Laser Scanning Gone Wrong

Matthew Shaw and William Trossell, the London-based duo known as ScanLAB Projects, continue to push the envelope of laser-scanning technology, producing visually stunning and conceptually intricate work that falls somewhere between art and practical surveying. Read More >>

wtf
Used Canola Oil Turns Dusty Paths Into Roads That Smell Like Chips

Fryer oil turns plain old potatoes into delicious chips. It powers our biodiesel cars. And, now, it's being used to turn the dusty surfaces of rural Canadian roads into stable makeshift asphalt—AND THEY SMELL LIKE CHIPS. God bless our obsession with that infernally unhealthy liquid. Read More >>

science
Inside the DIY World of Mapping Caves With Radio

Underground, where this is no GPS and certainly no Wi-Fi, mapping caves requires a different kind of technical ingenuity. Thus, there is cave radio. To learn about the DIY world of cave radio and underground exploration, Gizmodo picked the brain of Stanley Sides, tinkerer and former president of the Cave Research Foundation. Read More >>

environment
The US Grows the Most Productive Plants in the World, Says NASA

Remember learning about America's "amber waves of grain?" Probably not, you're from the UK, but over yonder it's a lyric from a well known patriotic song. As it turns out that the United States' bread basket—a.k.a., the Corn Belt—is even more productive than previously thought. In fact, during its growing season, it's the most productive land on Earth, according to new NASA data. Read More >>

science
The Fossilised Machines Humans Will Leave Behind

In the debut issue of a new journal called The Anthropocene Review, University of Leicester geologist Jan Zalasiewicz leads a team of five writers in discussing the gradual fossilisation of human artefacts, including industrial machines, everyday objects, and even whole cities. They refer to these as "technofossils," and they're destined to form a whole new layer of the earth's surface. Read More >>

science
The Latest Mining Boom? Plants That Eat Metal and Scrub the Soil Clean

Plants that eat metal sound like a biological impossibility. But these hungry little guys exist, sucking tiny bits of toxic metal from the soil. They don't just clean the Earth, either—they can actually mine bits of gold and nickel for use by humans. Read More >>

art
What Sunsets Painted Centuries Ago Reveal About Global Air Pollution

Dramatic sunsets are undeniably gorgeous, but they portend something ominous: millions of fine particles polluting the air. Researchers are now studying sunsets painted over the past 500 years to find clues to how our air got dirtier after the Industrial Revolution. Read More >>

cars
How the Corvette Museum Rescued its Cars From a Giant Sinkhole

In a story that united geologists with rare car enthusiasts last month, a massive sinkhole opened up beneath the National Corvette Museums's Skydome, swallowing eight rare cars into its cavernous depths. Since then, the museum has worked tirelessly to recover the cars and fill in the sinkhole so that the Skydome can open anew. But how do you undo a giant sinkhole? Read More >>