science
Mysterious Planetwide Rumble May Have Come From the Largest Underwater Eruption Ever Recorded

On November 11, 2018, a deep rumble ricocheted around the world, one that humans couldn’t feel but that registered quite clearly on seismometers. A new pre-print paper about the event is now suggesting that it was caused by the largest offshore volcanic event in recorded history. Read More >>

science
‘Dormant’ Supervolcano Packed With 240 Cubic Miles of Magma

It’s been around 100,000 years since the Long Valley supervolcano in the US state of California experienced a major eruption, but this supposedly dormant caldera has been acting a bit strangely over the past four decades. New research suggests 240 cubic miles of magma still exists within this supervolcano, but thankfully, a major eruption remains unlikely. Read More >>

science
Dino-Killing Asteroid Caused Magma to Burst From the Ocean Floor, Say Scientists

At the end of the Cretaceous era, a large meteorite ploughed into what is now Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula. The collision set off a chain reaction of environmental calamities that likely contributed to the demise of the dinosaurs. New research is now adding to the list of ensuing catastrophes, suggesting the collision cracked our planet’s seafloor like an egg, forcing magma to pour out along the ocean’s tectonic ridges. Read More >>

energy
Molten Magma Could Power Electric Plants of the Future

Good old geothermal plants generate power using water heated by hot rocks deep underground. But what if we could get energy directly from the seething magma down below? In Iceland, an accidental discovery let scientists actually stick a pipe into magma to test this idea—and the results of their experiment have just been published in the journal Geothermics. Read More >>