science
Newly Discovered Volcanic ‘Lost World’ Is a Haven for Marine Life

Australian scientists have discovered a previously unknown chain of volcanic seamounts near Tasmania. The area appears to be brimming with marine life, including a surprising number of whales who may be using the undersea volcanoes as a navigational tool. Read More >>

science
Diseased Ocean Microbes Could Be Messing With the Weather

Our oceans are brimming with microscopic phytoplankton—plant-like organisms that contribute significantly to marine diversity. Tiny though they are, these sea critters, when infected with a particular virus, may influence atmospheric processes such as cloud formation, according to new research. Read More >>

science
Adorable New Shark Species Named After Trailblazing Marine Biologist Eugenie Clark

Say hello to Squalus clarkae, otherwise known as Genie’s dogfish. This newly identified species of deepwater shark was named in honour of Eugenie Clark, a scientific pioneer who influenced an entire generation of marine biologists. Read More >>

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Baby Giant Manta Rays Grow up Together in This Newly Discovered Nursery

Marine biologist Joshua Stewart was scuba diving in the Gulf of Mexico when he spotted a baby manta ray — an unexpected find, given that juveniles are extremely rare and seldom observed by humans. Read More >>

enviroment
Pilot Whale Dies in Thailand After Being Found With 17 Pounds of Plastic Bags in Its Stomach

A male pilot whale struggled for five days to stay alive in Thailand near the Malaysian border after rescuers found it with 17 pounds of plastic bags in its stomach, the Washington Post reported on Sunday, but it ultimately succumbed to its illnesses. Read More >>

environment
The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Has Way More Crap Inside It Than We Thought

For years, scientists have been tracking a large accumulation of floating rubbish, mostly bits of plastic, in the north Pacific ocean called the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch,” or the “trash vortex.” This region, according to the latest research, has more lost and discarded plastic inside it than previous surveys suggested—like, a lot more. And it’s still growing. Read More >>

science
First-Ever Footage of Anglerfish Mating Is as Horrifying as You’d Imagine

>Deep sea anglerfish look like some kind of tragic holdover from the Precambrian Era, with their large head, dead eyes, fang-like teeth, and glowing “fishing rod” that extends from their dorsal fin. Scientists had never actually seen these creatures mate in the wild, but sadly, that’s no longer case. It is with our deepest regrets that we present to you the very first footage of anglerfish boning. Read More >>

science
These Freaky Fish Can Turn Their Eyes Into Flashlights

At slightly less than two inches long, triplefin fish don’t seem like much of a threat. But as new research shows, these aquatic carnivores have a rare organ that turns their eyes into veritable flashlights—an ability they can switch on when needed. Read More >>

science
The World’s Loudest Fish Is Now a Victim of Its Own Unique Talent

Each year, over a million Gulf corvina swim to their spawning grounds along the Colorado River Delta. These fish are famous for their loud, chattering sounds, and when corvina gather together in massive conglomerations, the noise they produce is deafening. Literally. New research shows that the sounds produced by these fish when spawning are the loudest ever recorded for a single fish—an extraordinary display of nature that’s now being turned against the species. Read More >>

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Scientists Capture Rare Footage of Spooky Arctic Jellyfish

Using a small robotic sub, scientists from Columbia University have captured rare video of Arctic jellyfish slithering along the bottom of the Chukchi Sea near Barrow Alaska. The footage came as a complete surprise to the researchers, who weren’t expecting to see jellyfish during the Arctic winter. Read More >>

science
Newly Discovered Giant Sea Pancake Looks Goofy as Hell

Sunfish are the living, breathing incarnate of a dad joke—it’s kind of funny, but you feel disappointed in yourself for laughing at it because it’s painfully silly. Known as the world’s largest bony fish, ocean sunfish—which make up the genus mola—look like a drunk person’s rendition of a fish, or rather, a person who’s never seen a fish’s rendition of a fish. Read More >>

animals
Sad New Deep Sea Shark Reminds Us We Can’t All Be Great Whites

The tiger shark patrols the seas alone at night, prepared to eat anything from a bird to a dolphin. The goblin shark live in the ocean’s canyons and abysses, grabbing prey by surprise with its extendable jaws. A great white shark can grow as large as a Mercedes. Read More >>

science
This Could Be Why Orcas Have Been Eating Great White Sharks in South Africa

A South African shark-watching hotspot has recently turned into the scene of a seaside horror movie. For several months, enormous great white shark corpses have been washing up on the Gansbaai beaches, often missing their livers as if feasted upon by cetacean Hannibal Lecters. But this is no movie—it’s just biology, ruthless as ever. Read More >>

animals
Snooty, World’s Oldest Known Manatee, Dies at 69

We have all been robbed of one Snooty, the beautiful, beloved 69-year-old manatee believed to be not only the world’s oldest manatee living in captivity, but the oldest in the world. Read More >>