science
Why Scientists Trained a Seal to Sing the Star Wars Theme

Listening to grey seals recite vowel sounds and sing the melodies to Star Wars and 'Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star' makes for excellent entertainment, but for the researchers who trained these aquatic mammals, it’s serious science. Read More >>

science
Stunning but Deadly, China’s Bioluminescent Algal Blooms Are Getting Bigger

Satellite imagery taken over the past two decades shows that the toxic bioluminescent microorganisms responsible for China’s sparkling blue seas are becoming increasingly abundant. Read More >>

science
Some Deep-Sea Fish Can See Colour in Near Total Darkness

A newly discovered visual system in deep-sea fish could allow them to discern predators from prey in the low-light conditions found at the bottom of the ocean, new research suggests. Read More >>

science
Atlantic Shipwreck Graveyard May Be Key Habitat for Imperiled Sharks

Photographs taken by citizen scientist scuba divers show that female sand tiger sharks develop an affinity to certain shipwrecks off the coast of North Carolina – a finding that could prove useful to conservation efforts. Read More >>

science
Around-the-World Expedition Finds 200,000 Species of Viruses in the Oceans

After travelling around the world, sampling the ocean from pole to pole, scientists have uncovered nearly 200,000 populations of marine viruses. Read More >>

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Unsettling Video Shows What Happens to a Dead Alligator at the Bottom of the Sea

For the first time ever, scientists placed alligator carcasses at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico to see which bottom feeders might make a meal of the dead reptiles. The results came as a surprise even to the researchers. Read More >>

science
Penis-Shaped, Wood-Munching Clams Are More Diverse Than We Thought, Study Finds

Wood-boring clams don’t look like the ones you or I might find steamed with pasta. They’re smaller than a pea, and live exclusively in the deep ocean, tunnelling into sunken, waterlogged trees that were swept out to sea long ago to eat the wood. Now, scientists have determined that there are quite a few more groups of these bizarre molluscs than we thought. Read More >>

science
Newly Discovered Volcanic ‘Lost World’ Is a Haven for Marine Life

Australian scientists have discovered a previously unknown chain of volcanic seamounts near Tasmania. The area appears to be brimming with marine life, including a surprising number of whales who may be using the undersea volcanoes as a navigational tool. Read More >>

science
Diseased Ocean Microbes Could Be Messing With the Weather

Our oceans are brimming with microscopic phytoplankton—plant-like organisms that contribute significantly to marine diversity. Tiny though they are, these sea critters, when infected with a particular virus, may influence atmospheric processes such as cloud formation, according to new research. Read More >>

science
Adorable New Shark Species Named After Trailblazing Marine Biologist Eugenie Clark

Say hello to Squalus clarkae, otherwise known as Genie’s dogfish. This newly identified species of deepwater shark was named in honour of Eugenie Clark, a scientific pioneer who influenced an entire generation of marine biologists. Read More >>

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Baby Giant Manta Rays Grow up Together in This Newly Discovered Nursery

Marine biologist Joshua Stewart was scuba diving in the Gulf of Mexico when he spotted a baby manta ray — an unexpected find, given that juveniles are extremely rare and seldom observed by humans. Read More >>

enviroment
Pilot Whale Dies in Thailand After Being Found With 17 Pounds of Plastic Bags in Its Stomach

A male pilot whale struggled for five days to stay alive in Thailand near the Malaysian border after rescuers found it with 17 pounds of plastic bags in its stomach, the Washington Post reported on Sunday, but it ultimately succumbed to its illnesses. Read More >>

environment
The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Has Way More Crap Inside It Than We Thought

For years, scientists have been tracking a large accumulation of floating rubbish, mostly bits of plastic, in the north Pacific ocean called the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch,” or the “trash vortex.” This region, according to the latest research, has more lost and discarded plastic inside it than previous surveys suggested—like, a lot more. And it’s still growing. Read More >>

science
First-Ever Footage of Anglerfish Mating Is as Horrifying as You’d Imagine

>Deep sea anglerfish look like some kind of tragic holdover from the Precambrian Era, with their large head, dead eyes, fang-like teeth, and glowing “fishing rod” that extends from their dorsal fin. Scientists had never actually seen these creatures mate in the wild, but sadly, that’s no longer case. It is with our deepest regrets that we present to you the very first footage of anglerfish boning. Read More >>