enviroment
Pilot Whale Dies in Thailand After Being Found With 17 Pounds of Plastic Bags in Its Stomach

A male pilot whale struggled for five days to stay alive in Thailand near the Malaysian border after rescuers found it with 17 pounds of plastic bags in its stomach, the Washington Post reported on Sunday, but it ultimately succumbed to its illnesses. Read More >>

environment
The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Has Way More Crap Inside It Than We Thought

For years, scientists have been tracking a large accumulation of floating rubbish, mostly bits of plastic, in the north Pacific ocean called the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch,” or the “trash vortex.” This region, according to the latest research, has more lost and discarded plastic inside it than previous surveys suggested—like, a lot more. And it’s still growing. Read More >>

science
First-Ever Footage of Anglerfish Mating Is as Horrifying as You’d Imagine

>Deep sea anglerfish look like some kind of tragic holdover from the Precambrian Era, with their large head, dead eyes, fang-like teeth, and glowing “fishing rod” that extends from their dorsal fin. Scientists had never actually seen these creatures mate in the wild, but sadly, that’s no longer case. It is with our deepest regrets that we present to you the very first footage of anglerfish boning. Read More >>

science
These Freaky Fish Can Turn Their Eyes Into Flashlights

At slightly less than two inches long, triplefin fish don’t seem like much of a threat. But as new research shows, these aquatic carnivores have a rare organ that turns their eyes into veritable flashlights—an ability they can switch on when needed. Read More >>

science
The World’s Loudest Fish Is Now a Victim of Its Own Unique Talent

Each year, over a million Gulf corvina swim to their spawning grounds along the Colorado River Delta. These fish are famous for their loud, chattering sounds, and when corvina gather together in massive conglomerations, the noise they produce is deafening. Literally. New research shows that the sounds produced by these fish when spawning are the loudest ever recorded for a single fish—an extraordinary display of nature that’s now being turned against the species. Read More >>

watch this
Scientists Capture Rare Footage of Spooky Arctic Jellyfish

Using a small robotic sub, scientists from Columbia University have captured rare video of Arctic jellyfish slithering along the bottom of the Chukchi Sea near Barrow Alaska. The footage came as a complete surprise to the researchers, who weren’t expecting to see jellyfish during the Arctic winter. Read More >>

science
Newly Discovered Giant Sea Pancake Looks Goofy as Hell

Sunfish are the living, breathing incarnate of a dad joke—it’s kind of funny, but you feel disappointed in yourself for laughing at it because it’s painfully silly. Known as the world’s largest bony fish, ocean sunfish—which make up the genus mola—look like a drunk person’s rendition of a fish, or rather, a person who’s never seen a fish’s rendition of a fish. Read More >>

animals
Sad New Deep Sea Shark Reminds Us We Can’t All Be Great Whites

The tiger shark patrols the seas alone at night, prepared to eat anything from a bird to a dolphin. The goblin shark live in the ocean’s canyons and abysses, grabbing prey by surprise with its extendable jaws. A great white shark can grow as large as a Mercedes. Read More >>

science
This Could Be Why Orcas Have Been Eating Great White Sharks in South Africa

A South African shark-watching hotspot has recently turned into the scene of a seaside horror movie. For several months, enormous great white shark corpses have been washing up on the Gansbaai beaches, often missing their livers as if feasted upon by cetacean Hannibal Lecters. But this is no movie—it’s just biology, ruthless as ever. Read More >>

animals
Snooty, World’s Oldest Known Manatee, Dies at 69

We have all been robbed of one Snooty, the beautiful, beloved 69-year-old manatee believed to be not only the world’s oldest manatee living in captivity, but the oldest in the world. Read More >>

science
Hagfish Slime is Wonderful

Sadly, a flatbed truck dumping 7,500 lbs of live hagfish onto a highway in Oregon will not be the weirdest story of 2017. It will not even be close. Still, the situation warrants some kind of scientific explanation, since it’s not every day that the mucus of a living fossil destroys a Prius. Read More >>

science
New Deep Sea Hermit Crabs Have Super Weird Homes

Most hermit crabs live their lives in an endless episode of House Hunters, switching from one shell to the next. A newly discovered species of hermit crab, however, chooses to live in an unusual abode that’s actually also alive. Together, the home and its crustacean tenant live in a symbiotic relationship that appears to be infinitely less stressful than any TV programme on Sky Living. Read More >>

science
The Amazing Reason Deep Sea Corals Glow In the Dark

Lots of creatures glow in the ocean’s depths, where sunlight is slim to nil. But while most of these abyssal lightbulbs use their neon powers to hunt or avoid being hunted, deepwater corals may have beat everything else down there in terms of evolutionary creativity. New research indicates these corals glow in order to eat the meagre sunlight, turning their tissues into grow chambers that nourish tiny plants in a beam of artificial luminosity. Read More >>

science
Nightmarish Sea Spiders Pump Their Blood Using Their Guts

Earth’s oceans are well-stocked with otherworldly inhabitants, but few of these critters are quite as strange as sea spiders, which look like something that would lurk in the crawlspace under Slender Man’s house. With their impossibly spindly legs, sea spiders—which aren’t even actual spiders—stride across the ocean floor with eerily slow, deliberate steps. They eat by piercing stationary animals like sea anemones and sponges with their long proboscises, and sucking up chunks of tissue softened by digestive juices. Now, new research published in the journal Current Biology piles onto the weirdness, demonstrating that sea spiders move blood and oxygen around their bodies not by pumping their hearts, but by pumping their guts. Read More >>

environment
The Impacts of Deep Ocean Mining Will ‘Last Forever,’ Scientists Warn

The search for raw materials to feed the all-powerful Sarlacc of capitalism is pushing industries to increasingly remote and alien environments. One of the most exciting frontiers to emerge of late is the deep ocean—rife with valuable metals like copper and zinc, as well as the rare Earth elements that drive our smartphones and computers. But as humanity’s interest in plundering the deep of its riches heats up, scientists are warning that this new gold rush will have serious consequences. Read More >>