privacy
Report: The NSA’s Domestic Metadata Collection System Is Not Being Used and May Be Discontinued

The National Security Agency has “quietly shut down” the mass surveillance programme it implemented after the September 11th, 2001 terror attacks to analyse metadata on domestic US calls and text messages, the New York Times reported on Monday, citing an episode of the Lawfare podcast with “senior Republican congressional aide” Luke Murry. The Wall Street Journal separately reported that Murry stated the programme has not been used in at least six months, with both papers writing that it is unclear whether Donald Trump’s administration will ask Congress to renew its legal authority when relevant portions of the Patriot Act expire at the end of 2019. Read More >>

security
UK Intelligence Agencies Are Planning a Major Increase in ‘Large-Scale Data Hacking’

Intelligence agencies are preparing to “significantly increase their use of large-scale data hacking,” the Guardian reported on Saturday, in a move that is already alarming privacy advocates. Read More >>

surveillance
Citizen, the Creepy Crime-Fighting App Formerly Known as Vigilante, Somehow Gets £9 Million

Citizen, the extremely dubious rebranding of Vigilante—an app which notifies users of 911 reports near them and encourages them to go out and shoot videos of the crimes and their aftermath—has somehow managed to acquire a new round of eight-figure funding. Read More >>

security
Here’s a Truly Comprehensive Takedown of Mass Surveillance

The argument surrounding encryption, mass surveillance and terrorism is a difficult one, normally invoking some fiery passions, invocation of 9/11 and some mild racism. If anyone wants to debate with you, just sit them down in front of this video instead. Read More >>

privacy
The Government Just Set a Dangerous Precedent for Online Spying

The British government has revealed its justification for surveilling citizens' every move on Facebook, Twitter, and other social networks. UK citizens communicating using the aforementioned services are considered to be using "external communications," as the companies are not based in the UK. It's a distinction with staggering implications. Read More >>