autonomous vehicles
Researchers Taught Autonomous Cars to See Around Corners

Researchers at MIT are helping autonomous cars deliver on the promise of safer roads with a new trick that lets driverless vehicles see around corners to pre-emptively spot other vehicles or moving hazards that human drivers would never see coming. Read More >>

architecture
MIT Confirms a Bridge Leonardo da Vinci Designed 500 Years Ago Was an Ancient Engineering Marvel

Some 500 years after his death, researchers are still discovering just how talented and brilliant Leonardo da Vinci was. Architects and civil engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology used a 3D printer to create a replica of a bridge da Vinci designed, but never built. To their surprise, not only did it work, but it would have also revolutionized bridge design five centuries ago. Read More >>

batteries
AI Is the New Secret Weapon in the Quest for Better Batteries

Compared to all the electronics that power the tiny computer in your pocket; battery technology is downright disappointing. Not only does your smartphone need charging every day, but in a few years, its battery will be barely able to hold a charge at all. So how long will your device last? Researchers at Standford University and MIT have created an AI that can predict a battery’s potential lifespan after just a handful of charges. Read More >>

science
MIT’s New Plastic Muscles Could Bring Us One Step Closer to a Real-Life Westworld

We strive to make robots in our own likeness because, as far as we can tell, humans are best adapted to deal with our world. And thanks to researchers at MIT, who’ve found a way to use cheap, nylon plastic as an artificial muscle, we’re now one step closer to creating artificial humans—and opulent fantasy theme parks. Read More >>

research
MIT Thinks Furry Wetsuits Could Keep Divers Even Warmer

Ocean-dwelling creatures like whales, seals, and walruses don’t freeze in the icy waters thanks to their thick layers of insulating blubber. But how do scrawny sea otters stay warm? Their furry coats trap air which also works as an insulator, and researchers at MIT think that approach could help keep humans warmer under water, too. Read More >>