science
‘Remarkable’ Mathematical Proof Describes How to Solve Seemingly Impossible Computing Problem

You enter a cave. At the end of a dark corridor, you encounter a pair of sealed chambers. Inside each chamber is an all-knowing wizard. The prophecy says that with these oracles’ help, you can learn the answers to unanswerable problems. But there’s a catch: the oracles don’t always tell the truth. And though they cannot communicate with each other, their seemingly random responses to your questions are actually connected by the very fabric of the universe. To get the answer you seek, you must first devise... the questions. Read More >>

bioethics
China May Be Concealing Organ Harvesting Through Fake Donation Data, Scientists Report

China has been using an equation to produce fake organ donation data, according to researchers who used a forensic technique that sniffs out suspicious patterns in statistical datasets. Read More >>

mathematics
Mathematicians No Longer Stumped by the Number 3

Just on the heels of finding three cubed numbers that sum to 42, scientists have passed another important milestone by finding three enormous cubes that sum to 3. Read More >>

computing
If You Solve This Maths Problem, You Could Steal All the Bitcoin in the World

You may have heard of the famous P versus NP problem. If you can prove or disprove its cryptically short equation, you’d be a million dollars richer—and maybe even billions of dollars richer, depending on your scruples. Read More >>

maths
Soap Bubble Theorist Is the First Woman to Win the ‘Nobel Prize’ of Mathematics

Trailblazing mathematician Karen Uhlenbeck from the University of Texas at Austin, in the US, has been awarded the 2019 Abel Prize—regarded as one of the highest accolades in mathematics. She is now the first woman to receive the illustrious award. Read More >>

mathematics
Mathematicians Sceptical of Supposed Million-Dollar Proof

There are six outstanding problems that, if solved, will net you a $1 million reward. That's £760,000! On Monday, a highly regarded mathematician claimed in a lecture that he has proven perhaps the most famous of these problems, called the Riemann hypothesis. But there’s reason to be sceptical. Read More >>

optical illusions
How Can This Spinning Arrow That Always Points Right Actually Exist?

Mathematician Kokichi Sugihara, of Meiji University in Japan, once again proves he’s the greatest illusion inventor of our time. Instead of just creating mind-melting images, he creates real-life 3D objects that appear to ignore the laws of our universe. How can this arrow, that perpetually points right, no matter how you turn it, actually exist? Read More >>

science
Simulation May Finally Explain Why Knuckle Cracking Makes That Awful Sound

For decades, scientists have debated the cause of the popping sound when we crack our knuckles. Using computer models, a research team from France may have finally reached the answer. Read More >>

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This Trippy Music Video Is Made of 3D Fractals

What you’re watching isn’t organic, but a computer-generated visualisation of complex mathematics. It’s a three-dimensional fractal. Read More >>

maths
US FedEx Employee Discovers Largest Known Prime Number Containing a Staggering 23 Million Digits

Using a computer powered by an off-the-shelf Intel Core i5-6600 processor, a FedEx employee from America has discovered the largest prime number known to humanity. At 23,249,425 digits long, it’s nearly a million digits longer than the previous record holder. Read More >>

science
Dark Matter Is Not Dead

It can be easy to take hyped-up science papers as fact, especially when they involve the most esoteric imaginable ideas. But scientists are taking issue with a hyped-up new paper that claims it can eliminate the need for dark matter or dark energy in our Universe. Read More >>

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This Captivating Sci-Fi Short Film Was Randomly Generated By a Computer

We wouldn’t blame you for thinking that Julius Horsthuis spent weeks designing and animating his sci-fi short, Fraktaal, using 3D software. But as the artist reveals, “It so happens that I’m a lazy animator.” So he instead relied on complex mathematical fractal patterns to automatically generate the alien worlds and cities visited in his film. Read More >>

science
Scientists Want to Update These Four Fundamental Constants 

Scientists around the world just recommended changes to four fundamental constants. The tiny updates are important for the most accurate and precise measurements, but will ultimately allow researchers to base standard units, like the kilogram, on things more reliable than a metal weight. The General Council of Weights and Measures will vote on these updates in November 2018, with the proposal being published in the journal Metrologia. Read More >>

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The Never-Ending Descent Into This Infinite Fractal City Will Melt Your Brain

In Julius Horsthuis’ short film Recurrence, he takes the audience on a slow descent into a sprawling metropolis he’s created. But as you get closer and closer to the city, and try to make out details like houses and skyscrapers, you start to realise that those tiny details only reveal more of the same, and that your descent is never going to end. Read More >>

science
Pushing Particles Forwards Might Make Them Go Backwards Because Quantum Physics Is Bonkers

You are very lucky that you ended up about the size that you are today, somewhere between one and ten feet tall and weighing somewhere between one and one thousand pounds. This is a very good size. Not to body shame, but if you were, say, a quadrillion times shorter and weighed a nonillion times less (that’s one followed by 30 zeros), that would be very inconvenient for you. Everything would be very inconvenient for you. Read More >>