science
The World’s First Full-Colour, 3D X-rays Are Freaking Me Out

A high-contrast, black-and-white image of your bones is an effective tool for spotting fractures or breaks. But after 120+ years, x-ray imaging is getting a remarkable update with 3D, full-colour images that reveal far more than just the bones inside you. These images will improve what a doctor can diagnose without cutting you open. Read More >>

wtf
These Bizarre Glasses Promise to Cure Your Motion Sickness – But At What Cost

The engineers at Citroën have apparently thrown almost 100 years of French design refinement out the window with a new product you don’t drive, but will improve your motoring experience. The carmaker’s new Seetroën glasses won’t win you any style points, but Citroën claims the glasses will eliminate any motion sickness you’re feeling after wearing them for just 10 minutes. Read More >>

health
Gastric Balloons May Have Killed 12 People Since 2016 

Since 2016, at least 12 people have died worldwide soon after receiving a intragastric balloon, a new noninvasive procedure meant to help people lose weight, according to an alert released Monday by the US Food and Drug Administration (the FDA). Seven of the patients were in the US. In response, the FDA has approved new warning labels for two balloon products implicated in the deaths. Read More >>

research
Scientists Are Developing a Contact Lens That Tells You When You’re Ill

Imagine a biosensing contact lens that can tell when your blood sugar is getting too low, or if there’s something wrong with one of your organs. By leveraging the power of ultra-thin transistor technology, researchers from Oregon State University have taken us a step closer to achieving that goal. Read More >>

medicine
This Mini-MRI Scanner For Newborns is Ridiculously Cute

After 12 years of development, a miniature FMI scanner for newborns has been installed at a maternity hospital here in the UK—and it’s kind of adorable. Read More >>

medicine
This Human-Powered Paper Centrifuge Is Pure Genius

Inspired by an ancient toy, researchers from Stanford University have developed an ingenious hand-spun paper centrifuge. Incredibly, the device costs just 20 cents (17 pence)—and it can be used to detect malaria in blood in just 15 minutes. Read More >>

medicine
This USB Stick Performs an HIV Test

Scientists here in the UK have developed a USB stick that can quickly and accurately measure the amount of HIV is in a patient’s blood. Read More >>

medicine
US Approves World’s First Automated Insulin Pump for Diabetics

The US Food and Drug Administration has approved Medtronic’s MiniMed 670G, a medical device that monitors a diabetic’s sugar levels, and then automatically injects the required dose of insulin. Read More >>

medicine
The World’s Smallest Pacemaker Can Be Implanted Without Surgery

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved an injectable pacemaker that doesn’t require wired leads, which often lead to complications. Read More >>

medicine
Doctors Print a Medical-Grade Stethoscope for Less Than a Fiver

The stethoscope is a staple of modern medicine; but in parts of the developing world, off-the-shelf models are prohibitively expensive. That’s why a team of doctors and hackers in Gaza has started 3D printing their own. Read More >>

science
Remote-Controlled Drug Device Could Deliver Chemo at Home

Seven women suffering from osteoporosis got the chance to avoid their usual visits to the doctor for their injected medicines. Instead, their physician administered treatment remotely through an implant that pumped meds into their systems on demand while the patients rested at home. Read More >>