goop
Gwyneth Paltrow Isn’t Going to Let a £110,000 False Advertising Settlement Taint Goop’s Brand

It’s been a little more than a month since it was announced that Goop, the controversial lifestyle brand of actress Gwyneth Paltrow, settled a false advertising lawsuit over scientifically unproven claims about its vaginal quartz and jade eggs – you may remember the ones. However, in a new interview with BBC addressing criticism of the brand, Paltrow challenged claims that Goop sold products that veered into the realm of “pseudoscience.” Read More >>

science
A Major Scientific Project Aims to Find Out Exactly How the Internet Is Screwing With Your Brain

As anyone who has spent any amount of time on Twitter can tell you, the internet can bring out the worst in us. So it shouldn’t come as a surprise that scientists in Europe are now hoping to catalogue exactly how the online hellscape affects mental health and well-being. Read More >>

science
Scientists May Have Unlocked the Secret of How Ketamine Treats Depression So Quickly

In recent years, the party drug and anaesthetic ketamine has been embraced as a rapidly-acting, if still off-label, medication for some cases of depression and suicidal ideation that don’t respond to other treatments. But there’s still much we don’t understand about how it actually works so quickly to treat the crippling disorder. A new study released Wednesday out of Stanford University suggests that at least some of ketamine’s mojo relies on the same brain receptors that opioid painkillers activate. Read More >>

science
A Genetic Study Using 23andMe Data Finds Link Between Schizophrenia and Cannabis Use

There’s evidence of a connection between cannabis use and schizophrenia, but it’s unclear whether the drug leads to the disorder, or vice versa. A new study published today, which relies partly on genetic data from 23andMe volunteers, might offer a little clarity on that link. It found that people genetically at risk of schizophrenia are also more likely to start smoking marijuana, suggesting the disorder itself might cause cannabis use in some people. Read More >>

science
Sleep-Deprived People May Infect You With Loneliness

Not getting enough or the right kind of sleep is notoriously bad for physical health. But a new study out of the University of California, Berkeley suggests that poor sleep can be a nightmare for our social lives too. It just might turn us into lonely outcasts, capable of spreading our misery to others. Read More >>

mental health
Will Climate Change Actually Increase Suicide Rates?

Climate change is a public health crisis from its impacts on air quality to wiping out the healthcare systems we need to stave off sickness. Even the air conditioning we’ll need to beat the heat is likely to make things worse. Read More >>

health
Study: Eating Beef Jerky Might Be Linked to Manic Episodes in Some People

There is no singular cause of mental illness. Any number of things – our genes, environment, and even social mores – play a role in determining whether someone’s mental health will deteriorate to the point of being diagnosable as a disease. But researchers from Johns Hopkins have stumbled onto a possible trigger for manic episodes they didn’t expect to find: beef jerky. Read More >>

health
Massive Genetic Study Finds Many Links Between Various Psychiatric Illnesses

An excavation of a million people’s genes has provided some interesting clues to how several common psychiatric disorders might arise, including major depression and schizophrenia. And it’s also highlighted connections between some mental illnesses and other health problems, including heart disease. Read More >>

mental health
Doctors Have an Alarmingly High Suicide Rate, and No One is Sure How to Help Them

Medical doctors are more likely to die from suicide than members of any other profession in the US, suggests new research presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. And worse than that, few interventions seem to have helped make these suicides less common. Read More >>

health
Kids Raised on Farms Are Healthier in Two Important Ways

Scientists have long speculated that the “dirtier” the environment we grow up in—with lots of germs from different people and even animals—the better off our immune system and physical health ultimately will be. A new study published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science provides early evidence that a dirty world might even be better for our mental health, too. Read More >>

genetics
Largest Study of Its Kind Identifies 44 Genetic Risk Factors for Depression

Depression is a tricky beast. Symptoms vary widely from person to person, as does the response to treatment. But there’s no question that genetic makeup plays an important role, and understanding the genetic architecture of depression could help us better understand how to treat it. Read More >>

social media
Lifefaker Outs Our Social Media Mind Games

Lifefaker is a joke, but like all jokes apart from Michael McIntyre's, it also says something deep and serious about how we, as people, think and live. You know, like the boring bits on Stewart Lee. Read More >>

science
Ketamine Nasal Spray Relieves Suicidal Thoughts, but Doctors Worry About Abuse Risk

Ketamine, a drug that’s been retooled as a “breakthrough” in depression treatment, is one step closer to becoming mainstream medicine, thanks to the results of a Phase II clinical trial published this week in the American Journal of Psychiatry. But some experts are wary of creating a new drug-abuse crisis by introducing a potentially addictive drug to millions of new users. Read More >>

drugs
Just One Puff of Low-THC Weed Can Help Ease Sadness, Study Finds

It might take just one puff of cannabis to quickly if temporarily dull depression, depending on the strain, suggests a new study published this month in the Journal of Affective Disorders. But smoking weed for too long might also make you sadder over time, the researchers found. Read More >>

reddit
Reddit Is Helping Some People Deal With Their Mental Health Struggles

Reddit’s gotten plenty of deserved criticism over the years for hosting some of the most toxic communities on the internet. But a new study published this month in the Journal of Medical Internet Research suggests that at least some subreddits are helping people dealing with depression and other mental health issues come out of their shells. Read More >>