science
Does Your Skin Affect Your Mental Health, and Vice Versa? Psychodermatology Aims to Find the Connection

With every bottle of the oral acne medication isotretinoin, commonly known by the brand name Accutane, comes a large warning about the risks of psychiatric effects. “Accutane may cause depression, psychosis and, rarely, suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, suicide, and aggressive and/or violent behaviours,” states the label. There have been a number of high-profile suicides allegedly related to isotretinoin use, including the death by suicide of Seamus Todd, son of the late Irish actor Richard Todd, in 1997. Read More >>

science
A Lifelong Biodome Experiment Could Reveal How the Immune System Shapes Personality

It’s the sort of realisation that ought to make you existentially terrified: All of your thoughts and actions are influenced by countless interconnected factors, most of which you are never conscious of. Read More >>

science
Childhood Antibiotics Could Raise Risk of Mental Illness, Study Finds

For all the good that antibiotics do, relying on them too much can have pretty drastic drawbacks. In particular, their overuse can help create bacterial superbugs resistant to future antibiotics. But a new study published this week in JAMA Psychiatry suggests there’s another, more subtle consequence of antibiotic use, at least in young people: a higher risk of developing serious mental illnesses like obsessive-compulsive disorder and schizophrenia. Read More >>

health
Scientists Propose New Way to Treat Depression With Brain Implants

In recent years, doctors have explored an unorthodox method to address cases of depression that haven’t responded to other treatments: sending precise electrical shocks directly to areas of a patient’s brain, otherwise known as deep brain stimulation (DBS). While the technique has shown some promise, its positive effects tend to be inconsistent. Read More >>

science
Over 8 Per Cent of Americans Believe They Are Struggling With Compulsive Sexual Behaviour and Thoughts

Sex and everything that revolves around it can no doubt be stressful and confusing, at least some of the time. But for a decent chunk of Americans, a new survey suggests, their sexual hangups might be causing them a significant amount of mental anguish. Read More >>

goop
Gwyneth Paltrow Isn’t Going to Let a £110,000 False Advertising Settlement Taint Goop’s Brand

It’s been a little more than a month since it was announced that Goop, the controversial lifestyle brand of actress Gwyneth Paltrow, settled a false advertising lawsuit over scientifically unproven claims about its vaginal quartz and jade eggs – you may remember the ones. However, in a new interview with BBC addressing criticism of the brand, Paltrow challenged claims that Goop sold products that veered into the realm of “pseudoscience.” Read More >>

science
A Major Scientific Project Aims to Find Out Exactly How the Internet Is Screwing With Your Brain

As anyone who has spent any amount of time on Twitter can tell you, the internet can bring out the worst in us. So it shouldn’t come as a surprise that scientists in Europe are now hoping to catalogue exactly how the online hellscape affects mental health and well-being. Read More >>

science
Scientists May Have Unlocked the Secret of How Ketamine Treats Depression So Quickly

In recent years, the party drug and anaesthetic ketamine has been embraced as a rapidly-acting, if still off-label, medication for some cases of depression and suicidal ideation that don’t respond to other treatments. But there’s still much we don’t understand about how it actually works so quickly to treat the crippling disorder. A new study released Wednesday out of Stanford University suggests that at least some of ketamine’s mojo relies on the same brain receptors that opioid painkillers activate. Read More >>

science
A Genetic Study Using 23andMe Data Finds Link Between Schizophrenia and Cannabis Use

There’s evidence of a connection between cannabis use and schizophrenia, but it’s unclear whether the drug leads to the disorder, or vice versa. A new study published today, which relies partly on genetic data from 23andMe volunteers, might offer a little clarity on that link. It found that people genetically at risk of schizophrenia are also more likely to start smoking marijuana, suggesting the disorder itself might cause cannabis use in some people. Read More >>

science
Sleep-Deprived People May Infect You With Loneliness

Not getting enough or the right kind of sleep is notoriously bad for physical health. But a new study out of the University of California, Berkeley suggests that poor sleep can be a nightmare for our social lives too. It just might turn us into lonely outcasts, capable of spreading our misery to others. Read More >>

mental health
Will Climate Change Actually Increase Suicide Rates?

Climate change is a public health crisis from its impacts on air quality to wiping out the healthcare systems we need to stave off sickness. Even the air conditioning we’ll need to beat the heat is likely to make things worse. Read More >>

health
Study: Eating Beef Jerky Might Be Linked to Manic Episodes in Some People

There is no singular cause of mental illness. Any number of things – our genes, environment, and even social mores – play a role in determining whether someone’s mental health will deteriorate to the point of being diagnosable as a disease. But researchers from Johns Hopkins have stumbled onto a possible trigger for manic episodes they didn’t expect to find: beef jerky. Read More >>

health
Massive Genetic Study Finds Many Links Between Various Psychiatric Illnesses

An excavation of a million people’s genes has provided some interesting clues to how several common psychiatric disorders might arise, including major depression and schizophrenia. And it’s also highlighted connections between some mental illnesses and other health problems, including heart disease. Read More >>

mental health
Doctors Have an Alarmingly High Suicide Rate, and No One is Sure How to Help Them

Medical doctors are more likely to die from suicide than members of any other profession in the US, suggests new research presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Psychiatric Association. And worse than that, few interventions seem to have helped make these suicides less common. Read More >>

health
Kids Raised on Farms Are Healthier in Two Important Ways

Scientists have long speculated that the “dirtier” the environment we grow up in—with lots of germs from different people and even animals—the better off our immune system and physical health ultimately will be. A new study published Monday in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science provides early evidence that a dirty world might even be better for our mental health, too. Read More >>