science
Scientists Develop Important Tool for Connecting Poo Bacteria to Health

Your poop is a living forest. Seriously! Hundreds of species of microbes thrive inside of you, helping you to live your best life. Everyone’s microbiome differs—yours from your neighbours’, and different populations’ from one another’s. But there is much scientists still don’t know about the human microbiome. And one team of scientists think they’ve made a leap in helping us understand this forest. Read More >>

climate change
More Evidence That Pink Snow Will Be a Problem for the Planet

Last year, a team of European researchers was alarmed to learn that glaciers covered in pink snow—caused not by an Ocean Spray truck collision, but by snow-dwelling red algae—were melting faster than the surrounding white ice. Now, another group of researchers has observed the same phenomenon halfway across the world in Alaska. Pink snow really is a problem for Earth’s glaciers, and it could get a lot worse in the future. Read More >>

health
Doctors Slam New Recommendation That We Should Stop Antibiotic Treatments Early

Scientists from the UK caused quite a stir this week, when they announced that we don’t necessarily need to complete a full course of antibiotics in order to treat infections properly. It’s a provocative message, but sceptics say their advice is grossly premature—and even reckless. Read More >>

health
Certain Penis-Dwelling Bacteria Might Increase Your HIV Risk

HIV transmission is a complex process with factors beyond just who you sleep with and how. The virus ultimately needs to find its way to the correct kinds of cells in order to wreak havoc. And some of the risk, at least for those with penises, may come from the kinds of bacteria on the tip. Read More >>

science
Textbook-Rewriting Discovery Could Help Predict the Next Influenza Pandemic

Every year we go through the same motions: scientists figure out what the most common flu strains will be, and prepare a vaccine that will best protect against it. Those who get vaccinated avoid the new strains, those who don’t might get ill. But every so often, a new kind of flu pops up that doctors are unprepared to vaccinate against. That kind of flu can turn into a pandemic. Read More >>

science
Komodo Dragon Blood Could Save Your Life One Day

Many animals are good at healing us emotionally, like capybaras and tiny kittens in tiny hats. Regrettably though, if we got really sick, no amount of golden retriever puppies could do anything to help us. Komodo dragons, on the other hand, might not “adorable” in the traditional sense, but they could save us from untimely death. Read More >>

environment
Why Is Greenland’s Ice Sheet Covered in Industrial Waste-Chowing Bacteria?

The Greenland ice sheet is vast, majestic, pristine....and peppered with bacteria that seem equipped to survive in industrial waste, according to a new study. Which really makes you question the whole the pristine bit, now, doesn’t it? Read More >>

science
Scientists Code an Animated GIF Into DNA

What’s a strand of DNA but data? We often think of its units, the As, Cs, Ts, and Gs, as letters of the words in an instruction manual. But what if, instead, we think of them as biological computer bits, storing the smallest unit of information? What stops scientists from harnessing the power of those units, using the latest biological technology to treat DNA like a writable disk? Read More >>

science
Your Eyeballs May Be Covered in Disease-Fighting Bacteria

If the eyes are windows to the soul, they’re open windows, potentially letting in all kinds of unwelcome bugs. To ensure that doesn’t happen, our tears are loaded with microbe-killing compounds and immune cells. In fact, our eyes are so inhospitable that it was long thought they were the only part of our bodies which lacked a symbiotic bacterial community. But now, scientists have found evidence of a once-inconceivable ocular microbiome—and it may help eyes fight off disease. Read More >>

science
This Microbe Could Be the Planet’s Most Prolific Predator

This microscopic diplonemid doesn’t look like much, but it’s one of the most abundant single-celled hunters in the ocean. Researchers from the University of British Columbia have become the first to identify and photograph this surprisingly elusive — but ecologically important – sea creature. Read More >>

science
A Dreaded Superbug Has Officially Arrived in the United States

The US Centers for Disease Control has released a report in which it identifies over a dozen cases of a deadly, antibiotic-resistant fungus called Candida auris. It’s the first time this super-strain has been found in the US, and disturbingly, four of the first seven patients infected with it have died. Read More >>

medicine
Tasmanian Devil Milk Could Be a Magic Bullet Against Superbugs

Researchers from Australia have discovered that chemical compounds found in the milk of Tasmanian devils are capable of killing some of the most deadly bacterial infections — a surprising finding that could introduce a new class of weapons in the war against superbugs. Read More >>

medicine
Nobel Prize Awarded for Work on Cellular ‘Self-Cannibalism’

This year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to Japan’s Yoshinori Ohsumi for furthering our understanding of autophagy, the biological process wherein the body eats some of itself in order to survive. Read More >>

science
Watch as Bacteria Evolve Antibiotic Resistance in a Gigantic Petri Dish

By building a gigantic petri dish, researchers from Harvard Medical School and Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have produced an incredible visualisation showing bacteria as it mutates to become resistant to drugs. Read More >>