microplastics
Microplastics Are Airborne, Polluted Arctic Snow Reveals

Microplastic pollution has become so ubiquitous, it’s almost easier to find places covered in the stuff than not. High peaks, low valleys, and even the air we breathe is filled with microscopic bits of plastic. Read More >>

microplastics
We’re Eating a Whole Lot of Plastic… Uh, Is That Bad?

If you’re the type to get squeamish about the things you accidentally eat, you’re not going to like the new report released by the WWF (formerly known as the World Wildlife Fund) this Tuesday. According to the report, we might be eating a credit card’s worth of microplastic every week, thanks to widespread contamination of drinking water and seafood. But it’s still unclear how this consumption could be affecting our health. Read More >>

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There’s Microplastic Blowing in the Wind, Study Suggests

Some peaks throughout the Pyrénées Mountains of France stand more than 10,000 feet tall. Across the mountains’ ridges and valleys, adventurous visitors may spot a brown bear or a yellow lily, one of the wildflowers of the Pyrénées. But this mountain range is home to something else too, something not always visible to the human eye. And that’s plastic. Read More >>

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Scientists Say They’ve Found Microplastics in People’s Poo, But Don’t Worry Just Yet

The more we look, the more we find potentially toxic microplastics – the tiny bits of debris that our plastic products crumble into – everywhere in the environment, the surrounding wildlife, and even our food and beer. So perhaps it shouldn’t come as a surprise that new research released this week suggests that microplastics can end up in our poop. But it’s still unclear just how seriously we should take this discovery. Read More >>

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Report Finds Microplastic in 93 Per Cent of Bottled Water Tested, But Don’t Freak Out Yet

Testing of 259 plastic water bottles from nine countries revealed microplastic particles in water from 242 of the bottles, according to a new report. The test has prompted the World Health Organization to begin its own investigation, though there is no firm evidence that the presence of microplastics would make bottled water unsafe to drink. Read More >>