genetics
‘Alien’ Mummy Found in Atacama Desert Is Actually a Tiny, Mutated Human

Back in 2003, a strange skeleton was discovered in a deserted Chilean town in the Atacama Desert. Featuring an elongated skull, sunken eye sockets, and an impossibly tiny body, some suggested it was of extraterrestrial origin. An updated genetic analysis confirms the skeleton as being human—but with an unprecedented variety of mutations. Read More >>

science
Forensic Scientist Claims to Have Solved the Amelia Earhart Mystery

Pioneering aviator Amelia Earhart disappeared over the Pacific Ocean in 1937, and we’ve been wondering about her fate ever since. A re-examination of a forensic analysis performed in 1941 shows that bones found on a remote south Pacific island belonged to Earhart—a conclusion reached with a splashy 99 percent number attached to it. Sceptics, on the other hand, say the new analysis proves nothing. Read More >>

science
Scientists Have No Idea Why This Enriched Uranium Particle Was Floating Above Alaska

On August 3, 2016, seven kilometres above Alaska’s Aleutian Islands, a research plane captured something mysterious: an atmospheric aerosol particle enriched with the kind of uranium used in nuclear fuel and bombs. Read More >>

space
Astronomers Detect Almond-Scented Molecule That Will Help Solve Interstellar Radiation Mystery

There’s an unidentified source of infrared throughout the universe. By looking at the specific wavelengths of the light, scientists think that it comes from carbon—but not just any carbon, a special kind where the atoms are arranged in multiple hexagonal rings. No one has been able to spot one of these multi-ring “polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons,” or PAHs in space—even though the infrared emissions imply that these PAHs should make up 10 per cent of the universe’s carbon. Now, scientists have found a new hint. Read More >>

science
Visit to Biggest Underwater Volcano in Last 100 Years Reveals Deep Sea Mystery

Scientists knew something strange happened when they heard reports of a raft of floating rock near New Zealand back in 2012. That raft eventually grew to around 150 square miles—remains of the largest underwater volcanic eruption in the 20th or 21st century to date, bigger even than Mount St. Helens. Read More >>

science
DNA Evidence Reveals True Identity of Elusive Bird Species 

Ornithologist Wulf Gatter spent six days a week observing birds in the forest of Liberia, the West African country. He spotted one seen nowhere else, a medium-sized yellow songbird, on nine occasions during the county’s annual dry season lasting from November to February. It looked quite similar to another species, but had never-before-seen white markings on its wings. He finally captured a specimen towards the end of his visit in 1984—it seemed like he’d found a whole new species, which he named Phyllastrephus leucolepis, the Liberian Greenbul. Read More >>

mysteries
Legions of Squishy Sea Things Wash Up on Sea Shore

Legions of mysterious jelly-like creatures washed up on a California beach Monday and Tuesday, prompting speculation from locals. “Baby tremor monsters?” guessed a member of the Huntington Beach Community Facebook group. “Maybe the ‘ass-blaster’ version from “Tremors 3?” another membered pondered. “Aliens sent here to sick our brains out and rule our world,” someone else concluded. Read More >>

mysteries
Houseboat Gifted to ‘Homeless Youth’ Washes Up Empty on Other Side of Atlantic

This weekend, a mysterious, tar-covered houseboat apparently built by a Canadian adventurer was discovered unoccupied on Irish beach — some 3,000 miles from where it was last seen. Read More >>

weird
Canadian Military Investigates Mysterious Pings From the Arctic Seafloor

Indigenous hunters in the Canadian territory of Nunavut have reported unexplained sounds that appear to be coming from the Arctic seafloor. These sounds, described as “pings”, “hums”, and “beeps”, have attracted the attention of Canada’s Department of National Defense, which dispatched a plane to investigate. Read More >>

MH370
Malaysia Flight 370 Went Into a Steep Dive Before Crashing Into the Ocean

An analysis of debris from Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 suggests the ill-fated plane entered into a steep dive, crashing into the ocean with wing flaps in a retracted position. The new report suggests no one was at the controls at the time, and that no attempt was made to perform a controlled ditching. Read More >>

food
The Internet Asks: Why Is It Called ‘Grapefruit’ When There Are No Grapes?

In the internet age, the answer to most questions is just a web search away. Some queries, however, are too ponderous or inane to even be Bing-worthy. When all else fails, The Internet Asks responds. Read More >>

animals
What Is A Cryptid? The Gizmodo Guide To Undocumented And Unusual Beasts

Scotland has the Loch Ness Monster, Australia the Bunyip and America its Jersey Devil. All over the world you hear tales of mythical beasts, animals and monsters that might just exist, even if they’re not scientifically recognised. From lake monsters to living dinosaurs to creatures straight out of myth — we’re talking about cryptids. Read More >>

wtf
Sorry Treasure Hunters, That Fabled Nazi Gold Train Probably Doesn’t Exist

Earlier this summer, amateur treasure hunters made quite a stir when they announced the discovery of a long-lost Nazi gold train, buried under a pile of rocks in a Polish rail tunnel. It was a controversial claim to begin with, and now, scientists are saying it’s just a load of malarkey. Read More >>