science
How Scientifically Plausible Is the ‘Simian Flu’ in Planet of the Apes?

The Planet of the Apes prequels did much to explain how humans lost their status as the dominant species on the planet—a cataclysmic set of events fueled by a global pandemic known as the “Simian Flu.” This virus, the product of a medical experiment gone horribly wrong, wiped out the vast majority of humans, but it boosted the brains of apes. And in the latest installment of the franchise, the virus has mutated into an insidious new form, affecting humans in some disturbing new ways. That’s a lot for a single virus to do, prompting the inevitable question: How feasible is the Simian Flu from a scientific perspective? Read More >>

cute
The World’s Smallest Snowman is So Cute

Look at this cute little snowman! I bet he won’t even melt and make me cry like the snowman from Jack Frost does. Read More >>

science
World’s First “Nanofish” Coming to Swim Drugs Up Your Bloodstream

If the idea of a robot fish swimming through your veins elicits a Cronenberg-ian chill up your spine, you might want to brace yourself. Researchers at U.C. San Diego have created the first nanofish, the New Scientist reports—a magnet-powered bot that they hope to use for targeted delivery of medication, non-invasive surgery and single-cell manipulation. Read More >>

science
Record-Setting Hard Drive Writes Information One Atom At a Time

Researchers working in the Netherlands have developed an atomic-scale rewritable data-storage device capable of packing 500 terabits onto a single square inch. Incredibly, that’s enough to store every book written by humans on a surface the size of a postage stamp. Holy shit. Read More >>

space
Scientists Find a Possible Deal Breaker in the Quest to Build a Space Elevator

Carbon nanotubes have been pegged as the wonder material that could finally allow us to build a lift that could take humans to space. A discouraging new study suggests these microscopic strands aren’t as resilient as we thought — and all it could take is a single misplaced atom to bring the whole thing crashing down. Read More >>

science
The World’s Tiniest Light-Powered Engines Could Revolutionise Medicine

Nanomachines could revolutionise technology and modern medicine, if only we had viable power sources to make them move where we wanted them to go. Now scientists at the University of Cambridge have built the world’s tiniest engines, powered by light, as described in a new paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read More >>

science
New Nanowire Batteries Can Be Charged More Than 100,000 Times

Li-on batteries gradually deteriorate as they’re repeatedly drained and recharged. But now researchers from University of California, Irvine have developed a new nano-wire battery that can survive hundreds of thousands of charging cycles. Read More >>

research
The Australian Nanoscience Institute Puts Every Experiment Inside a Faraday Cage

Nanotechnology researchers at the University of Sydney now have a building that will make them the envy of the scientific community—with ultra-clean rooms, vibration-free floors and Faraday cages aplenty. Read More >>

science
Graphene Patterned After Moth Eyes Could Give Us ‘Smart Wallpaper’

Tweaking the structure of graphene so that it matches patterns found in the eyes of moths could one day give us “smart wallpaper,” among a host of other useful technologies. Read More >>

science
‘Chopsticks of Light’ Reveal What Makes Spider Silk So Stretchy

Spider silk is nature’s Kevlar. It’s stronger than steel, it’s waterproof, and you can stretch it as much as 30 to 40 per cent before it snaps. Now biophysicists at Johns Hopkins University think they know the secret to spider silk’s remarkable elasticity: protein threads that serve as stretchy “superstrings.” The researchers describe their work in a recent paper in the journal Nano Letters. Read More >>

science
Sensors Thinner Than Plastic Wrap Could Detect Breast Cancer

To beat cancer, early detection is crucial. Now, a team of Japanese and American scientists has revealed extremely thin sensors that could one day be built into skin-tight, tumour-detecting gloves for doctors, who can share digitised findings with other physicians. Read More >>

research
Scientists Made a Battery That Could Keep Hoverboards From Exploding

Hoverboards won’t stop exploding lately, perhaps due to overheating batteries. But what if the batteries could turn off before they get all hot and flamey? That’s the idea behind recent research at Stanford, and the benefits go far beyond gimmicky gadgets looking to avoid recalls. Read More >>

science
Scientists Build Tiny Microcannons That Fire Drug-Filled Nanobullets

The medical profession has long dreamed of an ideal delivery system for getting drugs to wherever in the body they’re needed most. Nanoscientists at the University of San Diego have come up with a novel means of doing so: why not fire the drugs at the intended targets, using tiny little cannons? Read More >>