science
Scientists Transplant Memories Between Sea Slugs… Sort of

If you were wondering, “Hey, scientists have done a lot recently, but when are they going to transplant memories like in Westworld?”—we’ve got good news. A team reports that they’ve now transplanted memories between slugs. Well, sort of, kind of. Read More >>

science
What Scientists Saw When They Put a Crocodile in an MRI Scanner and Played Classical Music

Sounds weird—and even a bit dangerous—but the experiment is revealing new insights into the evolution of brains and how mammals and birds acquired the capacity to comprehend complex sounds. Read More >>

science
Hold Up, Maybe Our Brains Actually Can Grow Back Neurons

A new study published Thursday in Cell Stem Cell is set to further stoke the debate over whether our brain can actually grow back neurons as we age. The research found that people, even into their golden years, are regenerating their stock of neurons right up until the point of death—seemingly contradicting the results of a major study released just last month. Read More >>

science
Prosthetic Memories Help Brain Injury Patients with Short-Term Recall

If, at its most essential, the brain is a mass of wires and circuits, then when something goes wrong, logic suggests the brain can be re-wired to fix it. This is the theory behind a host of research that seeks to correct things like mental illness, paralysis and blindness, and impaired cognitive ability, by interfering with the brain’s wiring and firing. Read More >>

science
This Brain Scanner Is Way Smaller Than fMRI but Somehow A Thousand Per Cent Creepier 

It may look like something befitting Halloween’s Michael Myers, but the device pictured above is actually a breakthrough in neuroscience—a portable, wearable brain scanner that can monitor neural activity while a person is moving. Read More >>

science
One of Déjà Vu’s Most Striking Features is Just an Illusion

You’ve been here before. You’ve read this article already. Every word feels familiar. Even the room you’re sitting in feels the same. You know exactly what happens next. Read More >>

psychology
Why Booze Makes You Mean

Dramatic mood shifts while drinking alcohol are normal, but for some of us, booze takes us down a path toward nasty, belligerent, and downright aggressive behavior. By studying brain scans of drunk men, Australian scientists have pinpointed the parts of our brain that go weak when we drink, making us meaner than usual. But like so many aspects of human psychology, it’s a lot more complicated than that. Read More >>

science
The US Intelligence Community Apparently Wants Someone to Build Them a Brain

Are you a postdoctoral researcher with a hankering to help the US government hone its brain-warfare skills? Well, this is just the job for you! Read More >>

science
Reminder: Blue Monday Isn’t Real

Today is so-called 'Blue Monday,' allegedly the most miserable day of the year. Sure, it's cold and we're all poor from Christmas, but we don't need made-up reasons to be grumpy alongside the real ones. Read More >>

science
Amputee Monkeys Learn to Control Robotic Arms by Changing Brains

These days, it’s no surprise to hear about primates controlling a robotic arm with their brains—even paralysed humans have done it. But how would a brain need to adapt if one of the limbs was missing? Read More >>

science
New Brain Technologies Could Lead to Terrifying Invasions of Privacy, Warn Scientists

Imagine for a minute that you survive a terrible accident, and lose function of your right arm. You receive a brain implant able to interpret your brain’s neural activity and reroute commands to a robotic arm. Then one day, someone hacks that chip, sending malicious commands to the robotic arm. It’s a biological invasion of privacy in which you are suddenly no longer in control. Read More >>

science
Artificial Intelligence Detects Suicidal Tendencies in People Using Brain Scans

Recent scientific progress has allowed us to begin decoding the significance of many different patterns of activity in the brain. Researchers have begun to understand patterns associated with disorders such as depression, in hopes of correcting it. Other research has zeroed in on how language and speech is signalled in the brain. In one often-cited experiment, researchers were even able to convert the MRI readouts of the test subjects’ brains into approximate renditions of the movie clips shown to participants. Read More >>

giz asks
What’s the Best Song, According to Science?

Some songs stick to your soul like ectoplasm. Whether you’re at the club or Chuck E. Cheese, sometimes you hear a certain song that brings you back to a moment in your life you’d forgotten. Good music is fun but ephemeral—the best music stays with you forever, sometimes a little too long. Seriously, stop buying Phish t-shirts. Read More >>

neuroscience
Scientists Demonstrate Ability to Decode Images of Human Faces by Scanning Monkeys’ Brains

A group of researchers published a study this week in which they showed off an ability to reconstruct a photo of a human face just from recording the brain waves of a monkey that was viewing the photo. It represents a huge leap in our understanding of how the brain recognises faces and a potential window into recording what the brain is seeing. Read More >>

futurism
When Will Robots Deserve Human Rights?

Films and TV shows like Blade Runner, Humans, and Westworld, where highly advanced robots have no rights, trouble our conscience. They show us that our behaviours are not just harmful to robots—they also demean and diminish us as a species. We like to think we’re better than the characters on the screen, and that when the time comes, we’ll do the right thing, and treat our intelligent machines with a little more dignity and respect. Read More >>