dreams
Why Do We Remember Some Dreams but Not Others?

If you’ve ever woken up on the brink of a heart attack, drenched in sweat and convinced you’ll never live down the shame of sprinting nude through downtown Pittsburgh, you know that some dreams are more memorable than others. Most dreams, in fact, seem totally unmemorable – at least in the sense that we can’t remember them. And yet every now and then a dream will linger into breakfast and well into the day, or month, or year – will become a memory like any other. Read More >>

science
Would Perfect Memory Be a Burden or a Superpower?

The ability to remember every moment of your life sounds like an amazing proposition, but for the very few people who actually have this ability, it comes at a cost. Read More >>

science
Experimental Drug Offers a ‘Glimmer of Hope’ for People With a Devastating Form of Multiple Sclerosis

New research funded by the National Institutes of Health suggests an experimental drug can slow down the brain damage caused by a form of multiple sclerosis (MS), an incurable neurological disorder that eats away at the protective coating of our nervous system. But it’s still unclear whether the drug can noticeably improve the crippling symptoms sufferers experience. Read More >>

science
Tiny Tunnels Previously Unknown to Scientists Found Between the Skull and Brain

It’s not every day that scientists find a completely new aspect of human anatomy, but a study published this week in Nature Neuroscience is providing exactly that, describing a previously unknown network of tunnels located between the skull and the brain. Read More >>

science
Your Brain Tries to Change Focus Four Times per Second, Study Finds

By the time you’re finished reading this sentence, your brain will have rapidly assessed your surroundings 14 times to see if you should focus on something else. At least, that’s what new research suggests. Read More >>

science
Scientists Transplant Memories Between Sea Slugs… Sort of

If you were wondering, “Hey, scientists have done a lot recently, but when are they going to transplant memories like in Westworld?”—we’ve got good news. A team reports that they’ve now transplanted memories between slugs. Well, sort of, kind of. Read More >>

science
What Scientists Saw When They Put a Crocodile in an MRI Scanner and Played Classical Music

Sounds weird—and even a bit dangerous—but the experiment is revealing new insights into the evolution of brains and how mammals and birds acquired the capacity to comprehend complex sounds. Read More >>

science
Hold Up, Maybe Our Brains Actually Can Grow Back Neurons

A new study published Thursday in Cell Stem Cell is set to further stoke the debate over whether our brain can actually grow back neurons as we age. The research found that people, even into their golden years, are regenerating their stock of neurons right up until the point of death—seemingly contradicting the results of a major study released just last month. Read More >>

science
Prosthetic Memories Help Brain Injury Patients with Short-Term Recall

If, at its most essential, the brain is a mass of wires and circuits, then when something goes wrong, logic suggests the brain can be re-wired to fix it. This is the theory behind a host of research that seeks to correct things like mental illness, paralysis and blindness, and impaired cognitive ability, by interfering with the brain’s wiring and firing. Read More >>

science
This Brain Scanner Is Way Smaller Than fMRI but Somehow A Thousand Per Cent Creepier 

It may look like something befitting Halloween’s Michael Myers, but the device pictured above is actually a breakthrough in neuroscience—a portable, wearable brain scanner that can monitor neural activity while a person is moving. Read More >>

science
One of Déjà Vu’s Most Striking Features is Just an Illusion

You’ve been here before. You’ve read this article already. Every word feels familiar. Even the room you’re sitting in feels the same. You know exactly what happens next. Read More >>

psychology
Why Booze Makes You Mean

Dramatic mood shifts while drinking alcohol are normal, but for some of us, booze takes us down a path toward nasty, belligerent, and downright aggressive behavior. By studying brain scans of drunk men, Australian scientists have pinpointed the parts of our brain that go weak when we drink, making us meaner than usual. But like so many aspects of human psychology, it’s a lot more complicated than that. Read More >>

science
The US Intelligence Community Apparently Wants Someone to Build Them a Brain

Are you a postdoctoral researcher with a hankering to help the US government hone its brain-warfare skills? Well, this is just the job for you! Read More >>

science
Reminder: Blue Monday Isn’t Real

Today is so-called 'Blue Monday,' allegedly the most miserable day of the year. Sure, it's cold and we're all poor from Christmas, but we don't need made-up reasons to be grumpy alongside the real ones. Read More >>

science
Amputee Monkeys Learn to Control Robotic Arms by Changing Brains

These days, it’s no surprise to hear about primates controlling a robotic arm with their brains—even paralysed humans have done it. But how would a brain need to adapt if one of the limbs was missing? Read More >>