science
‘Limited’ Nuclear Strikes Could Still Wreak Climate Havoc

With the Cold War a fading memory, some nuclear powers have adopted strategies allowing for limited nuclear strikes. But a disturbing new study shows that even small batches of nukes can have disastrous environmental consequences on a global scale. Read More >>

interesting
How Close Do You Live to a Nuclear Bomb?

Hooray. If you live south of the Equator or in any of the countries that light up green in the map above, you’re good. Keep on living there because you don’t squat next to any nuclear weapons. But if you’re in the countries painted red — like the United States, Germany, Russia, China, India, etc. — you might live closer to a nuclear bomb than you think. Read More >>

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Could We Survive a Nuclear Winter?

Here’s the short answer: we probably could not survive a nuclear winter. But the long answer depends on which countries are going to war, how many nukes are being dropped, and where those bombs are being detonated. Read More >>

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The True Scale of Nuclear Bombs Is Terrifying

Nuclear weapons are already scary enough, but when you dig deeper and find out how powerful the weapons truly are, they get even more terrifying. Read More >>

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10 of the Craziest Nuclear Bomb Explosions in Movie History

There have been over 2,000 nuclear explosions in real life but if we believe the movies, it seems like every other action movie drops one in for added colour. And I totally get it. I hope to never see a nuclear bomb go off in person but I wouldn't mind seeing more explosive mushroom cloud visuals in my movies. They look so cool. Read More >>

history
You Can Buy This Window From the Manhattan Project for a Small Fortune

Bonhams auction house is gearing up for a big "History of Science" sale on October 22. Among the many intriguing lots is a slab of unique glass used during one of the darkest scientific pursuits the world has ever embarked upon: The Manhattan Project. But don't worry. It's not radioactive. Read More >>

science
How Nuclear Bombs Tell Us the Age of Human Cells

When mushroom clouds exploded in the sky during Cold War era nuclear bombs testing, they also created an unexpected boon for science. The nuclear explosions caused a massive uptick in Carbon-14 that eventually settled in all living tissue—everything from tree rings, to elephant tusks, to human brain cells. Read More >>

nuclear
How Many Nukes Would It Take to Blow Up the Entire Planet?

Dropping one nuclear bomb is terrible enough—cities leveled, populations vaporised. Horrible enough on its own—but what if you dropped 183.000? Goodbye, USA. So what about obliterating the moon? We've got it. Read More >>