Common Bricks May Record Evidence of Nuclear Weapons

Researchers have long studied retrospective dosimetry—looking at what kind of radiation was present in a room based on the signature left over in the environment. Frequently, this requires lots of treatment and work. One team of researchers at North Carolina State University thinks they have a simple way to detect the leftover radiation simply by taking a core of material out of a brick. Something like this could be important for things like nuclear weapons inspections. Read More >>

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Putin Nukes Florida in New Animated Video Showing Russia’s Futuristic Weapons

Russian President Vladimir Putin delivered his annual address to the country’s Federal Assembly today, showing off some impressive new weapons in the process. One of the concept videos even showed a nuclear strike using multiple warheads against the United States. The video depicts the state of Florida, to be exact—the site of President Trump’s private club in Palm Beach. Read More >>

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After Disastrous Hawaii Incident, Senators Propose Ending States’ Power to Send Missile Alerts

In mid-January, the Hawaiian state Emergency Management Agency sent out an erroneous text to all cell phones in the state warning of a “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII,” sending many residents into an hour-long panic as they ran for cover from what they feared was a North Korean nuclear bomb. Though it first appeared that bad design in the EMA computer system which sent out the alert was to blame, federal investigators later said the alert was intentionally sent by a now-fired employee who mistook an ongoing drill for a real attack. Read More >>

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Employee Who Triggered Bogus Missile Alert in Hawaii Has Been Fired

The unnamed state government employee who caused a panic after sending out an alert that missiles were about to strike Hawaii has been fired. Three more staff, including the head of the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency, have also resigned, but the case of the Missile That Wasn’t There still leaves people with plenty of questions. Read More >>

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US Government Investigation Explains How That Nuke Alert Happened in Hawaii

Two weeks ago, residents of Hawaii kissed their loved ones goodbye or huddled in confusion after emergency warnings of an incoming ballistic missile threat were sent out in error. Forty minutes later, they were told it was all a mistake, and that an employee clicked the wrong button. But a Federal Communications Commission (FCC) investigation has concluded that wasn’t actually what happened. Read More >>

Doomsday Clock Moves 30 Seconds Closer to Midnight Because The World Is Getting More Dangerous

It’s two minutes to midnight. And that’s really bad news if you’re a fan of planet Earth. Read More >>

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Hawaii’s Governor Forgot His Twitter Password During That Fake Ballistic Missile Alert

Earlier this month, the state of Hawaii descended into a brief if existentially terrifying panic as its Emergency Management Agency dispatched a mass text message warning of an imminent “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT” after an employee pressed the wrong button. Many residents immediately scrambled for cover from what they believed was an inbound nuclear missile from North Korea. Read More >>

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How Americans of the 1960s Really Felt About Nuclear Fallout Shelters

If you had to guess the percentage of American households that had a fallout shelter in the 1960s, what would you say? 50 percent? 25 percent? As low as 10 percent? In reality, just 1.4 percent of Americans had a nuclear fallout shelter in 1962. And the study that gave us that figure provides a fascinating look into the mindset of Americans during the Cold War. Read More >>

Hawaii Alert System Accidentally Warns of Imminent ‘BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT’

On Saturday, smartphones in Hawaii lit up with the ominous warning, “BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAD INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER. THIS IS NOT A DRILL.” A minor panic almost immediately ensued as the public wondered whether a nuclear warhead was indeed about to obliterate part of the U.S. Read More >>

Americans Played American Football in the Nuked Remains of Nagasaki for the ‘Atom Bowl’ in 1946

The US and North Korea seem to be on the brink of starting a nuclear war almost every single day here in 2018. But even if a nuclear bomb is used and millions die, whatever humans left surviving will try to achieve some level of normalcy in the aftermath. How do I know that? In 1946, American troops played an American football game in Nagasaki after dropping a nuclear bomb on it. Read More >>

62 Rare Nuclear Test Films Have Been Declassified and Uploaded to YouTube

Nuclear test films from 1945 to 1962 are literally rotting away in US government storage facilities. But those highly classified films are now being restored, declassified, and released on YouTube thanks to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. And 62 more never-before-seen films were just released today. Read More >>

RIP Robert Blakeley, Designer of the Fallout Shelter Sign

Designer Robert W. Blakeley isn’t a household name, but every American has seen his work. No, he wasn’t employed by Coca-Cola or Ford or Disney, but instead worked for the US government. Blakeley’s most famous design? He came up with the yellow and black fallout shelter sign. Sadly, he died last week at the age of 95. Read More >>

Lecture at Los Alamos in 1992: ‘The End of the Soviet Union is the End of Who We Thought We Were’

“Do not buy maps, buy stock in companies that print maps,” Dr Paul Goble told a group at Los Alamos National Laboratory in November of 1992. Read More >>

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North Korea Releases New Video of Simulated Missile Attack Against Guam

Fox News declared President Trump victorious last week, insisting that his unhinged threats against North Korea had deterred the country from planning a missile launch. North Korea had previously threatened to shoot a missile over Japan that would land in the waters near Guam. But those celebrations may have been a bit premature. Read More >>

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Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists Study: North Korea’s Missiles Built For Show, Can’t Hit US Mainland Yet

Is America on the brink of all-out nuclear war with North Korea? Experts say no, probably not. But according to a new technical analysis of North Korea’s missile technology in the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, even if it did come to that, the closest to the US heartland Kim Jong Un can strike is Anchorage, Alaska. Read More >>