science
Newly Discovered Volcanic ‘Lost World’ Is a Haven for Marine Life

Australian scientists have discovered a previously unknown chain of volcanic seamounts near Tasmania. The area appears to be brimming with marine life, including a surprising number of whales who may be using the undersea volcanoes as a navigational tool. Read More >>

enviroment
The First Marine Wilderness Map Shows There’s Not Much of It Left

For the first time, scientists have mapped how much oceanic wilderness remains. Only 13.2 per cent of the oceans are unspoiled, a shocking finding that shows the extent to which humans have reshaped the planet above and below the waves. Read More >>

robots
This Folding Robotic Device Captures Delicate Sea Creatures Without Crushing Them

Our oceans are home to a diverse array of aquatic organisms, a surprising number of which have yet to be discovered. To help in the search for these fascinating creatures, researchers have developed a robotic device capable of capturing even the most delicate deep-sea animals, which it does with a foldable, 12-sided hand. Read More >>

science
What Caused the Loudest Underwater Sound Ever Recorded?

In 1997, scientists with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association were recording the sounds of underwater volcanic activity when they picked up a noise that was so incredibly loud—louder than any underwater sound ever detected—that they initially thought it must be an equipment malfunction. But then another underwater microphone picked up the same noise... over 3,000 kilometres away. Read More >>

science
Whoa, Check out Zebrafish Eyes

Imagine that during our evolutionary history, we could not turn our heads up or down. How might our vision have evolved differently from the two frontal, mobile eyes we have today? Read More >>

watch this
Baby Giant Manta Rays Grow up Together in This Newly Discovered Nursery

Marine biologist Joshua Stewart was scuba diving in the Gulf of Mexico when he spotted a baby manta ray — an unexpected find, given that juveniles are extremely rare and seldom observed by humans. Read More >>

enviroment
Pilot Whale Dies in Thailand After Being Found With 17 Pounds of Plastic Bags in Its Stomach

A male pilot whale struggled for five days to stay alive in Thailand near the Malaysian border after rescuers found it with 17 pounds of plastic bags in its stomach, the Washington Post reported on Sunday, but it ultimately succumbed to its illnesses. Read More >>

science
Monster 78-Foot Wave Recorded in the Southern Ocean

At 78 feet tall, and churned by a fierce storm, it’s the largest wave ever recorded in the southern hemisphere, New Zealand scientists report. Read More >>

environment
The Great Pacific Garbage Patch Has Way More Crap Inside It Than We Thought

For years, scientists have been tracking a large accumulation of floating rubbish, mostly bits of plastic, in the north Pacific ocean called the “Great Pacific Garbage Patch,” or the “trash vortex.” This region, according to the latest research, has more lost and discarded plastic inside it than previous surveys suggested—like, a lot more. And it’s still growing. Read More >>

robots
Scientists Use Nintendo Controller-Guided Robot Fish to Spy on Real Fish

The ocean covers more than two-thirds of our planet, and there’s so much of it left unexplored. How are we humans supposed to blend in to uncover all of its secrets, when our observation tools are hooked to clunky vehicles with fish-scaring propellers and jets? Read More >>

science
First Evidence that Microplastics Travel Up the Food Chain and Into Seal Bellies

You’re familiar with the food chain: little fish eats plankton, bigger fish eats the little fish, then a seal eats the bigger fish, thus consuming the energy from all three smaller animals. But what if the little fish had also eaten an indigestible piece of plastic? New evidence demonstrates the plastic could make it all the way up the food chain into the seal. Read More >>

science
Biologists Have a Cosmic Explanation For Last Year’s Mysterious Sperm Whale Strandings

Last year brought what seemed like a disturbing omen to communities surrounding Europe’s North Sea: a whole lot of beached sperm whales. As Gizmodo reported at the time, the whales entered the sea’s shallow waters, where their internal sonar-like systems stopped working, causing them to become stranded and die. But scientists didn’t know why the whales entered these dangerous shallow waters in the first place. Read More >>

science
The Amazing Reason Deep Sea Corals Glow In the Dark

Lots of creatures glow in the ocean’s depths, where sunlight is slim to nil. But while most of these abyssal lightbulbs use their neon powers to hunt or avoid being hunted, deepwater corals may have beat everything else down there in terms of evolutionary creativity. New research indicates these corals glow in order to eat the meagre sunlight, turning their tissues into grow chambers that nourish tiny plants in a beam of artificial luminosity. Read More >>

environment
The Oceans Are Getting Warmer Faster Than Anyone Realised

Great news, everyone! We’re getting better at measuring the changing temperature of the ocean. Unfortunately, the data shows that they are warming more rapidly than researchers thought. Read More >>

uncategorized
Swirling Underwater Fish Tornado Makes Sharknado Look Tame

As currents shift in the southeastern Pacific Ocean, they bring an abundance of nutrients and plankton to the region, luring predators of all sizes. Swarms of anchoveta arrive first for an easy meal, but soon find themselves having to come up with unique ways to fend off larger predators like sharks and tuna. The result should be familiar to fans of the popular B-movie Sharknado. Read More >>