science
Shooting Lasers at Frogs Brings Us Closer to Curing Cancer

A team of scientists has hacked a light-responsive protein into tadpoles, and used it as an on-off switch to suppress tumour growth. It’s a fascinating development that could one day lead to new tools for fighting cancer in humans. Read More >>

science
Often Zone Out Mid-Conversation? There’s a Good Excuse for That

MIT researchers have proven that regions of the brain can take a snooze even while you’re conscious. The team of neuroscientists have figured out that a circuit originating in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) can cause individual sections of your brain to either become less alert or fall completely asleep, independently of the regions surrounding it. It goes some way to explaining why many of us occasionally zone out during conversations.  Read More >>

science
For the Faint-Hearted: Scientists Could Soon Control Us With Lasers

A team of researchers has managed to use light to control the hearts of fruit flies, and the breakthrough could have major repercussions in the world of cardiology. Read More >>

science
This Mouse Can Be Wirelessly Controlled With an LED Device

This is surely a sign that we’re living in the future: researchers have just invented a remote-controlled LED chip that can make a mouse walk in circles by using light to activate motor neurons in the animal’s brain—or peripheral nerves throughout its body. Read More >>

research
Scientists Cured Paralysis in Mice with Stem Cells and Lasers

This is wild. Chasing the elusive dream of curing paralysis, a team of scientists used stem cells and optogenetics to circumvent the central motor system of lab mice whose nerves had been cut. This enabled them to blast individual motor neurons with a laser, triggering movement in the legs of the mice. Read More >>

research
Scientists Turn Off Pain Using Nothing But Light

Pain is a hard problem. Sure, we can throw a little morphine at pain in the short term, but researchers continue to struggle with solutions for chronic pain. New research from Stanford's futuristic Bio-X lab looks like a light at the end of the tunnel—literally. Read More >>