science
A Toddler Who Lived 3 Million Years Ago Could Walk Upright and Capably Climb Trees

A re-analysis of a three-million-year-old fossil suggests Australopithecus afarensis, an early hominid, had children who were as capable on two feet as they were in the trees—an important discovery that’s shedding new light on this critical stage in hominid evolution. Read More >>

science
Origin Mystery of Ancient Rhino-Like Mammal Solved By 55-Million-Year-Old Fossil

Tens of millions of years ago, after most land-roaming dinosaurs died out in the Cretaceous Period, a hodgepodge of ancient animals started to fill the landscapes the dinos left behind. One such group was the embrithopods: hoofed mammals, now extinct, whose name means “heavy-footed.” Read More >>

science
These Are the Most Ancient Frogs Ever Found Preserved in Amber

The extraordinary discovery of four small frogs preserved in amber is providing the earliest evidence of these now-prolific amphibians living in tropical rainforests. Read More >>

science
New Evidence Reveals a 17,000-Year-Old Coastal Route Into North America

The first people to cross into North America from Eurasia did so by travelling through the Bering Strait, or so the theory goes. A new theory has emerged proposing a coastal route into the continent, but evidence has been lacking. A recent analysis of boulders, bedrock, and fossils in Alaska is now providing a clearer picture, pointing to the emergence of a coastal route some 17,000 years ago. Read More >>

science
This Stupid Tick Managed to Get Itself Wrapped in Spider Silk — and Then Fossilised in Amber

Around 100 million years ago, a tick ran into some bad luck. It had the misfortune of wandering onto a spider’s web, causing the proprietor to spring into action and wrap the interloping bug in a tomb made of silk. The situation then took a turn for the worse when the tick came into contact with tree sap, enveloping it even further. Today, this scene is immortalised in amber — and it’s the first known fossil to hold a tick entombed in spider’s silk. Read More >>

science
Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Rewrote the History of Birds

The asteroid that hit Earth 65 million years ago didn’t just suck for the big lizards. Shockwaves likely knocked down the trees, fires would have burned up entire forests, and less light would have meant fewer plants. What if you were a bird who lived in those trees! That was your home! Read More >>

dinosaurs
How Smart Was T. Rex? And Other Dino Questions You’ve Always Wanted to Ask

At the age of 34, American palaeontologist and evolutionary biologist Steve Brusatte has already accomplished more in his field than some scientists hope to over their entire careers. Read More >>

science
Holy Shit, These Triassic Ocean Reptiles Were Big as Hell

Palaeontologists working along Britain’s southwest coast have unearthed a 205-million-year-old jawbone that belonged to an absolutely enormous species of ichthyosaur, a very successful group of aquatic reptiles. At approximately 85 feet in length, these monsters were one of the largest animals to have ever appeared on Earth. Read More >>

science
Fossilised Ichthyosaur Was Pregnant With Octuplets When She Died

An analysis of the fossilised remains of an Ichthyosaur—a Jurassic-era aquatic reptile—has revealed the presence of between six and eight small embryos packed within its ribs. It’s the earliest evidence of Ichthyosaur embryos to have ever been found in the British Isles. Read More >>

science
Before Our Species Left Africa, Now-Extinct Humans Made These Fancy Tools in India

Archaeologists have discovered sophisticated stone tools in India dating back some 385,000 years. That’s all sorts of incredible, because Homo sapiens like you and me didn’t leave Africa until about 175,000 years ago. The discovery is resetting what we know about so-called “archaic” humans and the dramatic extent to which they spread out from Africa so very long ago. Read More >>

science
New Species of African Titanosaur Solves Cretaceous-Era Mystery

Say hello to Mansourasaurus shahinae, a 14,000-pound titanosaur that rumbled across the African landscape during the final days of the dinosaurs. Its discovery is answering a long-standing mystery about dinosaur evolution at a time when Earth’s continents began drifting further and further apart. Read More >>

science
Stunning Fossil Discovery Pushes First Human Migration Out of Africa Back 50,000 Years

Archaeologists in Israel have uncovered the partial jawbone from what appears to be a modern human. Dated to between 175,000 to 200,000 years old, the fossil is 50,000 years older than any other human fossil found in the region, suggesting humans left Africa far earlier than previously thought. Read More >>

science
New Evidence From Ancient Amber Shows Dinosaurs Were Plagued By Ticks

New research on 100 million year-old amber with ticks preserved inside indicates these tiny, annoying critters have been around for a long time—and that dinosaurs were among their hosts. Read More >>

science
Freaky New Dinosaur Was Part Duck, Part Raptor

The last few years have yielded some truly bizarre dinosaur discoveries. From rhino-like animals with massive heads and stubby spines, to beaked mishmashes of every dinosaur in the book, there’s been a cavalcade of incredible additions. But perhaps none of these quite measures up to the unrelenting strangeness of a newly-discovered species of dinosaur that lived in the Cretaceous period of Mongolia some 75 million years ago. Read More >>

science
Why Did Male Mammoths Get Stuck in Traps More Often Than Female Mammoths?

While conducting an analysis of woolly mammoth DNA, European researchers noticed something a little strange. A disproportionate number of male mammoths were found preserved in traps, such as holes and bogs. The explanation, say the researchers, can be be tied to the behavior of their distant relatives—the modern elephant. Read More >>