science
Newly Discovered Ancient Carnivore Was Bigger Than a Polar Bear and Is True Nightmare Fuel

New research describes the remains of a gigantic, four-legged mammalian carnivore that terrorised Africa some 22 million years ago. Read More >>

science
Liquid Blood Extracted From 42,000-Year-Old Foal Found Frozen in Siberia

Scientists in the Yakutsk region of Siberia have managed to extract samples of liquid blood from a 42,000-year-old foal that was found embedded in permafrost back in 2018. The scientists are hoping to collect viable cells for the purpose of cloning the extinct species of horse. Read More >>

science
New Species of Tiny, Extinct Human Discovered in Philippine Cave

Scientists are reporting the discovery of a previously unknown species of ancient human that lived in the Philippines over 50,000 years ago. Evidence suggests the new species, named Homo luzonensis, was exceptionally tiny—and possibly even smaller than the famous Hobbit species uncovered on the island of Flores in 2004. Read More >>

science
Intricate Skin Impressions Still Visible on ‘Exquisitely Preserved’ Dinosaur Footprints

During the Early Cretaceous, a small two-legged dinosaur walked across a stretch of fine-grained mud following a rainstorm. The resulting footprints became locked in stone, but unlike other fossilised dinosaur tracks, these 120-million-year-old fossils show skin impressions across the entire footprint, in what is considered an unprecedented discovery. Read More >>

Palaeontology
Unknown Species of Ancient Four-Legged Whale Uncovered in Peru

The discovery of a fossilised, 42-million-year-old, four-legged whale is shedding new light on the evolution and geographical spread of these aquatic mammals. Read More >>

health
What’s the Oldest Disease?

Some things never change. Dying terribly from bone cancer, for instance: that’s something humans have been doing from about the beginning of our time. Has it always been like this, or was there some blissful period, in our species’ salad days, in which no one perished from bone cancer? Which sickness has burdened us—or our ancestors, or any lifeform—the longest? To find out, for this Giz Asks we reached out to a number of anthropologists, who provided their takes on the oldest disease. Read More >>

Palaeontology
Scientists Find Fossilised Fish That May Have Been Blasted by Debris From Asteroid That Ended the Dinosaur Age

Palaeontologists unearthed among the most important graveyards on Earth in the US state of North Dakota: the fossilised remains of fish seemingly killed by the effects of the dinosaur-ending meteor. Read More >>

Palaeontology
Scientists Find Huge Trove of Marine Fossils from the ‘Cambrian Explosion’ in China

Scientists have uncovered a wealth of well-preserved fossils in China from the early Cambrian Period, representing 101 species so far, over half of which have never been described before. Read More >>

science
Ancient Bird Fossil Includes Evidence of an Unlaid Egg

Palaeontologists in China have detected traces of an unlaid egg in a 110-million-year-old bird fossil from the Cretaceous period, in what’s considered the first discovery of its kind. And in an ironic twist, it appears the egg is what killed the mother bird. Read More >>

Palaeontology
We Can Thank Agriculture and Soft Food for the ‘F’ Word, Claims Provocative New Study

Humans couldn’t always easily produce “f” and “v” sounds, according to a surprising new study. The reason we can now enjoy words like “flavour” and “effervescent,” say the researchers, has to do with changes to the ancestral human diet and the introduction of soft foods—a development that altered the way we bite, and by consequence, the way we talk. Read More >>

Palaeontology
What Did T. Rex Look Like? A New Exhibit Has the ‘Ultimate Predator’ in Feathers

The latest fossil discoveries and palaeontological research continue to revise our view of the world’s most famous dinosaur, Tyrannosaurus rex. An updated depiction of the extinct giant is now on display in a New York City exhibit that’s bound to ruffle some feathers. Read More >>

Palaeontology
Ritual Sacrifice of 137 Children Found at 15th-Century Archaeological Site in Peru

Archaeologists working at a 15th-century site in Peru have unearthed the remains of 137 children and 200 llamas in what’s now considered the largest mass child sacrifice known from the New World—and possibly of all time. Read More >>

science
New Studies of Ancient Lava Add Mystery to the Dinosaur Extinction Story

Solidified lava from ancient volcanoes, over a mile thick, covers about 200,000 miles of west-central India. Contained in the dramatic and craggy striped rock are secrets scientists are only beginning to uncover—secrets that could partially rewrite the story of the dinosaur mass extinction 66 million years ago. Read More >>

science
Newly Discovered African Titanosaur Had a Distinctly Heart-Shaped Tailbone

Titanosaurs were the giants of the giants—four-legged behemoths that stomped around Cretaceous South America and Africa 100 million years ago. The discovery of a previously unknown titanosaur in Tanzania with a unique heart-shaped tailbone is adding to our knowledge of these enigmatic beasts, and how they lived and evolved on the African continent. Read More >>

science
Rare Spider Fossil Preserves 100-Million-Year-Old Glowing Eyes

A new spider fossil discovery included a surprising find: remnants of reflective eye tissue. Read More >>