Palaeontology
How the Last Woolly Mammoths Met Their Demise on a Remote Arctic Island

The last mammoths to stomp on Earth lived on Wrangel Island in the Arctic Ocean. This isolated population lived for thousands of years after most mammoths were gone, but when extinction finally came, it happened quickly. New evidence may finally explain what happened to these stubborn holdouts. Read More >>

science
Meet the ‘Cold Dragon of the North Winds,’ a Gigantic Canadian Pterosaur

An updated analysis of a 77-million-year-old fossil found in Alberta, Canada has resulted in the creation of a new genus and species of pterosaur. The newly named flying reptile, dubbed Cryodrakon boreas, featured an impressive 32-foot wingspan (but probably not the Canadian flag colours depicted above). Read More >>

Palaeontology
Newly Discovered Japanese Duck-Billed Dinosaur Was a Cretaceous Beach Bum

Introducing Kamuysaurus japonicus – an entirely new genus and species of hadrosaur from Japan. The location of its fossilised remains suggests these majestic herbivores browsed ancient shorelines, expanding our knowledge of this wildly successful group of dinosaurs. Read More >>

science
Incredible Fossils Link Ancient Creature to Earliest ‘Footprints’ on Earth

Aquatic, worm-like animals capable of crawling through mud appeared at least 550 million years ago, according to new fossil evidence. The discovery is helping to resolve a longstanding question as to when segmented, mobile animals first appeared on the planet. Read More >>

science
Incredible Fossil Discovery Finally Puts a Face on an Elusive Early Hominin

The discovery of a nearly intact skull in Ethiopia is the first to show the facial characteristics of a critically important species linked to early hominin evolution. At the same time, the 3.8-million-year-old fossil is further complicating our understanding of Australopithecus—the genus that likely gave rise to humans. Read More >>

Palaeontology
Fossil Hunters Found Bones From an Ancient Whale… and Then They Saw the Bite Marks

There was tremendous turmoil at the top of the water’s surface. An island of flesh, once living and swimming gracefully through these ancient seas, bobbed silently, at times yanked violently to the side or jolted upward by forces below it. Read More >>

science
Scientists Reveal Brain Structure of 20-Million-Year-Old Monkey

Palaeontologists operating CT scanners have revealed the structure of a 20-million-year-old primate brain, thanks to an extremely well-preserved fossil skull. Read More >>

animals
Nah or Aww? Human-Size Penguins Once Waddled Across New Zealand

A fossil discovery has added another entry to the list of comically large New Zealand birds: a 5-foot-tall penguin. Read More >>

science
Ancient Bird Weighed Nearly 1,000 Pounds but Could Still Run Like an Ostrich

Palaeontologists working in Crimea have uncovered evidence of the largest bird ever found in Europe. Standing taller than an elephant and weighing nearly 1,000 pounds, this enormous bird could still run at a fast pace when threatened. Read More >>

Palaeontology
During the Ice Age, Long-Legged Hyenas Prowled the Arctic

A pair of fossilised teeth confirms the presence of hyenas north of the Arctic circle during the last Ice Age. The discovery fills an important fossil gap that finally explains how hyenas ended up in North America. Read More >>

Palaeontology
Meet the New King of Trilobites, R. rex

Nobody messes with the king. Well, except for the relentless passing of time. Read More >>

science
Pterosaurs Could Somehow Fly Right After Hatching, New Fossils Suggest

New analysis of recent fossil finds suggest that pterosaurs could fly very soon after they hatched, unlike today’s birds or bats. Read More >>

science
Punctured Skulls Suggest Sabre-Toothed Cats Fought Amongst Themselves

An analysis of two punctured sabre-toothed cat skulls suggests these extinct creatures engaged in intra-species combat. It’s further evidence that the exaggerated fangs of sabre-toothed cats were strong enough to penetrate bone. Read More >>

Palaeontology
Incredible Fossil Shows Coordinated Swimming in a School of Extinct Fish

An exquisite fossil of photographic-like quality shows nearly 260 tiny fish swimming together in what appears to be coordinated group action. The 50-million-year-old fossil is evidence that fish have been swimming together in shoals for a very long time. Read More >>

Palaeontology
New Breakthrough Means We Can Finally Detect the Colour Red in Ancient Fossils

Some 3 million years ago, a tiny mouse featuring reddish fur on its back and a white belly scurried across the landscape of what is now Germany. We know this thanks to a remarkable new breakthrough in which reddish colour pigment was detected in an ancient fossil—a scientific first. Read More >>