science
Giant Flying Turkeys Once Roamed Australia Because of Course They Did

Bird enthusiasts will be disappointed to know they were born millions of years too late. Palaeontologists from Flinders University in Australia have discovered five extinct megapode birds—among them, a giant brush-turkey called Progura gallinacea. The big bird was roughly the size of a kangaroo and weighed about eight kilograms yet it still managed to fly. Read More >>

science
Please Don’t Eat The Oldest Mushroom Fossil

Sam Heads and his team had just received a donation of fossil insects at the Prairie Research Institute, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. But when they started going through it, Heads realised that one of the fossils wasn’t a bug at all. “It looks like a mushroom,” he said. He showed it to a colleague. “It looks like a mushroom,” the colleague said. They brought it to their mushroom expert (a mycologist), Andrew Miller. “That’s a mushroom,” he said. Read More >>

science
How Much Force Could a T-rex Bite Deliver?

In the 1993 cult classic Jurassic Park, a T-rex manages to scare the living shit out of kid heroes Lex and Tim Murphy by casually ripping apart their Ford Explorer like it’s a scrap of meat. It’s a scene that crystallised the destructive power of this extinct apex predator in the public consciousness — and as a new study highlights, it might not have been that hyperbolic. Read More >>

science
How Does a 110-Million-Year-Old Dinosaur Still Have Its Skin?

An arresting image of a “mummified” dinosaur went viral this weekend after National Geographic broke the story of the 110-million-year-old armoured plant-eater, a newfound species of nodosaur whose exquisite remains are now on display in the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Alberta, Canada. Read More >>

dinosaurs
Celebrated ‘Baby Louie’ Fossil Identified as New Dinosaur Species

The fossilised remains of a Late Cretaceous dinosaur embryo that famously graced the cover of National Geographic in the 1990s have been identified as a new species of oversized oviraptorosaur. Weighing nearly 2,500 pounds as adults, these dinos were the largest roosting animals to ever appear on Earth—tending to nests as big as a monster truck tire. Read More >>

science
This New Dinosaur Looked an Awful Lot Like a Chicken

Meet Jianianhualong tengi, a distinctly chicken-like dinosaur that lived 125 million years ago, during the Cretaceous period. This newly discovered species of dinosaur now represents the earliest known common ancestor of birds and closely related bird-like dinos, with a feathering pattern associated with aerodynamics. Its discovery is offering new insights into the evolution of feathers and flight. Read More >>

science
Mice Have Been Mooching off Humans For an Astounding 15,000 Years

The common house mouse is one of the most recognisable creatures on the planet, yet we know surprisingly little about the origins of this crafty rodent. New research shows that house mice first entered human settlements far earlier than previously thought — but they had to fight a rival species to maintain their status as one of humanity’s most reviled pests. Read More >>

science
Largest-Ever Dinosaur Footprint Found in Australia’s Jurassic Park

Nineties kids who’ve always wanted to visit Jurassic Park to meet Jeff Goldblum—and dinosaurs—are in for a treat: A team of palaeontologists from the University of Queensland in Brisbane is claiming to have found the largest-ever dinosaur footprint in a region dubbed “Australia’s Jurassic Park.” While there hasn’t been a Jeff Goldblum sighting (yet), the researchers have identified 21 different types of dinosaur tracks within a 15.5-mile region of the Dampier Peninsula coastline, including a gigantic one measuring 5-feet-9-inches (1.75 meters) in length. Read More >>

science
This Poor Cretaceous Damselfly Has Been Waiting 100 Million Years to Get Laid

Scientists in China have discovered male damselflies caught in the act of trying to court females inside a piece of 100-million-year old amber. It’s an extremely rare find, providing a glimpse of insectoid peacocking behaviour during the age of dinosaurs. Read More >>

science
Scientists Claim to Have Found Our Planet’s Oldest Fossils

An international team of researchers say they’ve found fossils dating back to at least 3.77 billion years ago, making them the oldest fossils ever found on our planet. The discovery, though sure to attract scrutiny, has implications for our understanding of how life got started on Earth—and how it may have emerged elsewhere. Read More >>

paleontology
This Laser Reconstruction of a Four-Winged Dinosaur Is Incredible

Using high-powered lasers, palaeontologists have detected rare traces of soft tissue in the fossilised remains of Anchiornis — a four-winged dinosaur that lived during the late Jurassic period. The findings are offering new insights into the origin of birds and the development of flight. Read More >>

science
This 400-Million-Year-Old Worm Monster is Metal as Hell

The past is often portrayed as a Pandora’s Box of terrifying monsters. But while many paleontologists reject this stereotype, the scientists behind the newly-discovered marine worm Websteroprion armstrongi have decided to embrace it. It turns out this Palaeozoic prince of darkness, which roamed the seas roughly 400-million-years-ago, has a pretty metal origin story. Read More >>

science
480-Million-Year-Old Slug Looks Like a Horrifying Mutated Bathmat

480 million years ago, a slug-like ancestor of modern snails and clams had hundreds of tiny teeth, a body covered in prickly spines, and a built-in helmet. Called Calvapilosa, it’s one of the earliest — and weirdest — mollusks ever discovered. Read More >>

paleontology
This 500-Million-Year-Old Sea Creature Boggles the Imagination

A stubbly, worm-like creature featuring as many as 30 limbs combed the seafloor during the early Cambrian period, according to new research. Its bizarre appearance and feeding behaviour are unlike anything ever seen before. Read More >>

science
These Dinosaur Bones Have a Little Meat On Them

Organic matter decomposes and sediment takes its place during the fossilisation process, turning bones to rock. Soft tissue and proteins do not stick around. But in at least one 195-million-year-old dinosaur rib bone, some ancient bits of collagen protein found a way. Read More >>