science
Why Do Birds Have Colourful Eggs? Because They’re Dinosaurs

Dinosaurs laid colourful eggs. Birds lay colourful eggs. You do the maths. Read More >>

science
World’s Oldest Fossils Aren’t Actually Fossils, New Research Suggests

Two years ago, researchers from the University of Wollongong in Australia shook the science world by claiming to have discovered 3.7 billion-year-old fossils in a rock formation in Greenland, a finding that pushed back the origin of life on Earth by 200 million years. New research is now casting doubt on this discovery, with scientists saying the rock structures are of non-biological origin. Read More >>

science
Flesh-Eating, Piranha-Like Fish Terrorised Jurassic Seas Because of Course They Did

Piranha-like creatures capable of biting chunks of flesh from their victims appeared some 150 million years ago, according to new research. Read More >>

science
Hungry Dinosaurs May be the Reason Humans Need Sunscreen

What do blind cavefish, dinosaurs, and sunburnt humans have in common? A lot more than you may realise, according to a thought-provoking new study. Read More >>

science
Rare T-Rex Relative Discovered in New Mexico

They don’t look remarkable to the untrained eye. The skull bones are fragmentary, unrecognisable to most. The story of a fearsome tyrannosaur, who lived millions of years before T-Rex, would remain lost to the ages had it not been for the fossil’s discovery in New Mexico by a dedicated team of dinosaur hunters. Read More >>

science
Meet the New Long-Necked Dinosaur Called ‘Giant Thunderclap at Dawn’

The discovery of a new Jurassic dinosaur in South Africa shows that the transition from small, two-legged creatures to the thunderously huge long-necked dinosaurs wasn’t a straightforward process. Read More >>

dinosaurs
Look at This Incredible New Armoured Dinosaur Found in Utah

They’re calling this newly discovered dinosaur “thorny head,” and it’s changing what we know of North American ankylosaurs, the heavily armoured herbivores that had the misfortune of living alongside Tyrannosaurus rex during the Late Cretaceous. Read More >>

dinosaurs
This Triassic Beast Paved the Way for the World’s Largest Dinosaurs

Introducing Ingentia prima, a large, four-legged, long-necked dinosaur that lived a whopping 47 million years before giants like Diplodocus and Brontosaurus shook the Earth. Found in Argentina, its fossil is providing important new insights into the evolution of dinosaurs, and how sauropods grew to such colossal sizes. Read More >>

paleontology
Meet Jason, the Tiny Beetle Stuck in Amber for 99 Million Years

Featherwing beetles are some of the smallest insects out there — and one researcher managed to spot an ancient specimen in a 99-million-year-old chunk of amber. Just half a millimetre long, this Cretaceous period beetle had its signature fringed wings unfurled when it met its sticky demise. Read More >>

science
Scientists Cry Foul as Skeleton of Mystery Dino is Auctioned Off for £1.75 Million

Beneath the metallic frame of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, the fossilised remains of an unknown species of dinosaur sold to an anonymous buyer earlier today for €2 million (£1.75 million). A group of scientists had tried to stop the sale, saying such an important scientific discovery shouldn’t fall to a private collector. Read More >>

paleontology
Pterodactyls Probably Didn’t Fly Like We Think They Did

The popular conception of pterodactyl flight shows them in a pose with wings and legs spread far apart similar to the way bats do it. But as new research shows, it’s very unlikely that flying lizards were able to move their joints and hind legs in such a manner — a finding that could influence the way scientists study mobility and movements in extinct animals. Read More >>

science
Genetic Analysis Suggests Squirrels Contributed to the Global Spread of Leprosy

Leprosy is one of the oldest known diseases to afflict humans, yet its origin is mired in controversy. A new study, in which 10 strains of the disease were detected in the remains medieval Europeans, is now complicating the picture even further by pointing to western Europe as a potential launching point for leprosy. What’s more, the evidence also points to squirrels as a major contributing factor in the spread of the dreaded disease. Read More >>

archaeology
Stunning Discovery Shows Early Humans Were Hunting Rhinos in the Philippines Over 700,000 Years Ago

Our species, Homo sapiens, weren’t the first humans to leave Africa—not by a long shot. The remarkable discovery of a 709,000-year-old butchered rhino fossil in the Philippines shows that so-called archaic humans were romping around the islands of southeast Asia a full 400,000 years before our species even existed. Read More >>

science
Did Neanderthals Go Extinct Because of the Size of Their Brains?

Using computers and MRI scans, researchers have created the most detailed reconstruction of a Neanderthal brain to date, offering new insights into the social and cognitive abilities of these extinct humans. But as to whether these characteristics were responsible for their ultimate demise remains an open question. Read More >>

biology
Why Neanderthals Had Faces That Were So Different From Ours

Compared to modern humans, Neanderthals had heavy eyebrows, huge noses, and large, long faces that bulged forward. Using 3D computer models, an international team of scientists has analysed these facial features in detail, uncovering some likely explanations for these dramatic physical differences. Read More >>