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Watch Gravity Punish This Paraglider for Using a Selfie Stick at 2,500 Feet

You’ve been told for years now to stop using selfie sticks. They’re obnoxious, they’re annoying to others, and they make everyone’s vacation photos look the same. It seems even gravity has now had enough of the stupid accessories, as this paraglider discovered while soaring at 2,500 feet in the air (starting at around 1:11 in the video below). Read More >>

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Paragliding at the Bottom of a Narrow Canyon Is Scarier Than Any Roller Coaster on Earth

At some point in time humanity got its wires crossed and parachutes, an invention designed to save lives, became a tool for risking life and limb. Instead of gracefully floating down the side of a mountain, paraglider Joseph Innes skimmed along the bottom of a narrow canyon, just inches away from breaking an ankle, and possibly every bone in his body. Read More >>

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Swinging From a Paraglider Is a Terrifying Way to See the Swiss Alps

Not content with hopping aboard a tour bus or renting a helicopter, professional base jumper Quentin Luçon figured the best way to see the Swiss Alps was to hang from a giant swing suspended below someone gliding over the majestic mountain range with a parachute. Read More >>

Infinity Loops
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Man Spins 568 Times Head-Over-Heels In the Air and Somehow Doesn’t Vomit

Just watching this video makes me feel a bit queasy. Horacio Llorens took back his mid-air 'Infinity Tumbling' world record by flipping head over heals with a parachute 568 times. That's 15 minutes of solid looping. Insane. Read More >>

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This Awesome Photographer Paraglides to Take Extreme Desert Pictures

If you ever wondered how National Geographic manages to take those gorgeous shots of the desert and overhead pictures of animals, the answer: paragliding. Coasting through the nothingness of nature is almost more beautiful than the pictures itself. Photographer George Steinmetz has flown in these motorised paragliders over a dozen times and has seen nearly every extreme desert. What an awesome job. [National Geographic via Neatorama] Read More >>