science
Physicists Observe Completely Unexpected Effect in Collisions Between Gold and Protons

Even the people tasked with understanding the most fundamental pieces of our Universe run into surprises. And a surprise has popped up in the data of a decommissioned experiment at America’s largest atom smasher. Read More >>

space
All the Wild Shit We’re Going to Do in Space and Physics in 2018

It’s time to gaze into our crystal ball and see what the coming year has in store for science. From powerful new rockets and asteroid-sampling spacecraft to groundbreaking particle physics, there’s plenty to look forward to in 2018. Read More >>

science
Ultimate Theory of Particle Physics Holds Where Physicists Hoped It Wouldn’t

The smallest pieces of the universe are governed by a beautiful and mind-blowing set of rules: the “Standard Model.” The Standard Model explains the behaviour of all 17 discovered particles, and it continues to make predictions that have been proven accurate by the largest physics experiments in the world, including the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland. But the model is incomplete. Read More >>

science
The Coolest Scientific Discoveries of 2017

Science may be just a tool to help us understand our Universe. But we can all agree that one of its major perks is that leads to the discovery of plenty of really cool, mind-boggling stuff. Read More >>

science
Biggest Quark Spotted in Whole New Way

Imagine you are baking a cake. You use the same ingredients that you always use, and boom, cake. But now, imagine your surprise when you discover you can make the exact same cake—an identical cake—but with a whole new set of ingredients. Read More >>

science
Ghost Particles Detected on Far Side of Earth Bolsters Crucial Physics Theory

If we’re ever going to truly understand how our Universe works, we’ll need to take lots of different measurements, but measuring can be one of science’s most difficult tasks. How, for example, do scientists measure an invisible thing that passes directly through solid matter without stopping? The inventions scientists come up with to make this possible are often truly incredible—even if the measurements made are totally expected. Read More >>

science
Two Teams Have Simultaneously Unearthed Evidence of an Exotic New Particle

A few months ago, physicists observed an new subatomic particle—essentially an awkwardly-named, crazy cousin of the proton. Its mere existence has energised teams of particle physicists to dream up new ways about how matter forms, arranges itself, and exists. Read More >>

science
Basic Assumptions of Physics Might Require the Future to Influence the Past

One of the most well-accepted physical theories makes no logical sense. Quantum mechanics, the theory that governs the smallest possible spaces, forces our human brains to accept some really wacky, uncomfortable realities. Maybe we live in a world where certain observations can force our universe to branch into multiple ones. Or maybe actions in the present influence things earlier in time. Read More >>

science
New Particle Discovery Reignites Decade-Old Physics Controversy

Scientists at the Large Hadron Collider in Switzerland have discovered an exciting new particle—or rather, an exciting combination of particles. It doesn’t have quite the same impact that the Higgs Boson (the one people called the God Particle) did five years ago. But it does have people talking, and many folks are thinking about a controversial set of results from an older experiment. Read More >>

science
The Scientists Who Look for Nothing to Understand Everything

Physicist Usama Hussain laughed uncomfortably every time the conversation even got close to the question, “Do you look for nothing?”. His professors would kill him if they heard him agree with that. After all, he’s technically looking for a brand new particle that may or may not exist, with the hopes that it might help explain some of the Universe’s weirdness. Read More >>

science
The Teenagers Hunting for the Universe’s Secrets

Four British schoolboys had just been called from the classroom. They were ten days away from their A-level exams, the ones that determine the direction the rest of their lives would take, but they’d been interrupted from their studies to discuss the deepest secrets of the universe—their work hunting for the magnetic monopole at the Large Hadron Collider. Read More >>

science
I Ventured to the Most Radioactive Spot in Town With This Super High-Tech Radiation Camera

If I were in America, the TSA agent would have called in backup on the spot and I would have received a long questioning. I had just asked the airport security agent if I could leave my laptop open as it rolled through the x-ray scanner. I pointed to the black thumb drive-looking thing sticking out of my USB port. I told them all I wanted to do was test the radiation levels using the attachment, the MiniPix USB particle camera. Read More >>

science
Scientists Are Exploring a Strange New Way to Create an Exotic Phase of Matter

Hiding in the Geneva suburbs, behind trees and a meadow with fuzzy brown donkeys, is a warehouse with a lift that only visits negative floors. Hundreds of feet down, hyper complex detectors inside an octagonal tube the colour and size of a large barn whistle loudly and peer like cameras at protons, the positively charged bits at the centre of every atom. Those cameras may have just produced an exotic phase of matter in a brand new way. Maybe. Read More >>

science
A Trail of Strange Physics Results Offers Tantalising Hints of New Particles

Conceptually, particle physics experiments are surprisingly simple. Smash a shitload of particles together, and look at what comes out. The results will either confirm whatever the business-as-usual theory is, or, if there’s a really crystal clear deviation from that theory, they might prove some new hypothesis about some new particles. But the middle ground, where the difference between what we know and what we see is still fuzzy, is where lots and lots of results live. Read More >>

childrens books
Anyone Can Learn Particle Physics With This New Children’s Book

You might flee from words like “quarks,” “relativity,” and “joule,” but you shouldn’t have to, and neither should a kid. A new children’s book from the folks at a few of our national labs will hopefully make the things particle physicists are talking about easier to digest. Read More >>