conservation
French Ban on Neonicotinoid Pesticides, Which Bees May Find Addictive, Goes Into Effect

A French ban on five neonicotinoid pesticides intended to protect the nation’s bees from colony collapse disorder went into effect on Saturday, Agence France-Press reported. Read More >>

science
DIY Bed Bug Treatment Attempt Accidentally Results in Massive Fire

Bed bugs—the blood-sucking, chitinous nightmares which serve as the clearest proof that if there is a divine creator behind the universe, it hates us—were once nearly eradicated from the U.S. But in recent years they’ve come back worse than ever, beefed up from decades of exposure to insecticides and helped along by an increase in global travel and a decrease in public knowledge of how to fight them. Read More >>

research
MIT Researchers Found a Way to Make Pesticides Stick to Plants

When farmers spray their crops with pesticides and other treatments to help ensure their survival, 98 per cent of those chemicals bounce right off the plants and end up in the groundwater as pollution. It’s a waste, and harmful to the environment, so researchers at MIT came up with a cheap but effective way to instead make those chemicals stick to crops. Read More >>

animals
Invasive Species Known to be Resistant to Pesticides Spotted Outside in US

The whitefly is kind of cute looking as far as invasive pests go, but they’ve recently been expanding their reach and are presenting a new threat to landscapers, gardeners, and farmers in the United States. Read More >>

animals
Bees Dying Globally At An Alarming Rate Thanks, In Part, to Pesticides

At the beginning of Bee Movie, Jerry Seinfeld explains in a voiceover, “According to all known laws of aviation,” bees should not be able to fly. But the bee flies anyway “because bees don’t care what humans think is impossible.” Read More >>

science
Why Bed Bugs are Getting Harder to Kill

Bed bugs are among the most dreaded pests we have to deal with, and they’re proving to be a formidable foe. New research suggests that bed bugs are able to ward off insecticides by developing thicker skins. Read More >>

science
Fruits And Vegetables Are More Aware Than You Think

You might not think that spinach knows what's up, but the produce in your fridge is still alive and aware. Which is creepy. But kind of awesome. According to new research, fruits and vegetables still have circadian rhythms up to a week after being harvested. And they respond to light patterns by producing chemical compounds to protect themselves against herbivores. Read More >>

monster machines
This Weed-Killing Robot Dispatches Dandelions with 98 Percent Accuracy

A prototype weed-seeking automaton could change the way seven billion humans eat, as well as help to end industrial agriculture's reliance on toxic herbicides and itinerant labor. Read More >>