space
What’s at the Edge of the Universe?

It is a routine emotion in 2019 to urgently wish, four or five times in a day, to be launched not simply into space but to the very edge of the universe, as far as it is possible to get from the fever dream of bad weather, busted trains and potentially cancerous thigh lesions that constitute life on Earth. But what would be waiting for you, up at the cosmological border? Is it even a border, or is what we’re dealing with here more like a kind of inconceivably vast ceiling? Is there even a border/ceiling up there at all? For this Giz Asks, we talked with a number of cosmology-oriented physicists to find out. Read More >>

science
New Research Could Be First Step Toward Buckyball-Powered Quantum Computers

Scientists have characterised the quantum behavior of buckminsterfullerene molecules, also known as buckyballs, with the hope of perhaps one day turning them into miniature quantum computers. Read More >>

science
A Guide to the Chemistry of Cold Weather

You might have noticed that it’s pretty cold at the moment – frostbite-inducing, school-closing, scald-yourself-with-boiling-water-while-attempting-that-stupid-instant-snow-trick cold. You might wonder what that means, scientifically. Read More >>

science
How Scientists Used a 1906 Photo to Find the Centre of San Francisco’s Most Infamous Earthquake

Researchers used a grainy photograph of a toppled train combined with an eyewitness account to analyse the deadly earthquake that struck San Francisco over 110 years ago. Read More >>

science
What’s the Worst Planet?

The best planet is Earth, objectively, and I only say that because I live there. Other than Earth, you might find fans of Jupiter, Mars, and even Mercury. But what about planets that absolutely stink? Are there planets which aren’t and will never be habitable, have absolutely nothing interesting to study, or just induce ire for no discernible reason? Read More >>

space
Amateur Astronomy Equipment May Have Spotted Tiny Object Beyond Neptune

Japanese astronomers spotted evidence of tiny Kuiper Belt object at the outer edge of the Solar System using a pair of telescopes you could buy online, according to a new paper. Read More >>

science
Scientists Try to Recreate Freakishly Tall ‘Rogue’ Waves in the Lab

On New Year’s Day, 1995, an instrument off the coast of Norway measured a rogue wave 84 feet high. Now, scientists are recreating these waves – albeit in miniature – in the lab. Read More >>

space
Is the Elusive ‘Planet Nine’ Actually a Massive Ring of Debris in the Outer Solar System?

The odd orbital arrangements of objects beyond Neptune have led scientists to speculate about the existence of a so-called Planet Nine – a hypothetical large planet in the outer reaches of the Solar System. New research suggests a planet isn’t required to achieve the anomalous orbits, and that a massive ring of debris is a more plausible explanation. Critics of the proposed disk say more evidence is needed. Read More >>

science
Why Did NASA and Others Spend Millions on This Quantum Computer?

Quantum computers are probably the most misunderstood of nascent technologies, which makes sense, because their very basics rely on the hardest-to-grasp concepts of physics. That’s led to people making some ridiculous claims, like that they give you “god-like powers” and that they’re an “imminent threat.” Read More >>

space
Saturn’s Rings Could Have Formed During the Dinosaur Age, New Analysis Suggests

Saturn’s rings might have formed relatively recently—like, in the past hundred million years or so—according to new research. Read More >>

science
CERN Unveils Design for 62-Mile-Round Atom Smasher More Powerful Than the Large Hadron Collider

A scientific collaboration has released a concept design for the Large Hadron Collider’s successor, an enormous new experiment that would sit inside a hundred-kilometre (62-mile) tunnel. Read More >>

science
This Quadruple Star System Is Unlike Anything We’ve Ever Seen Before

Astronomers using the ALMA telescope have discovered an oddly tilted planet-forming disk within a double binary star system, a configuration that up until this point only existed in theory. Read More >>

quantum computing
Why Experts Are Sceptical of IBM’s New Commercial Quantum Computer

IBM has announced the release of Q System One, or as the IBM team described it, “the world’s first fully integrated universal quantum computing system designed for scientific and commercial use.” Read More >>

science
The Unlikely Origins of the First Quantum Computer

Within days of each other back in 1998, two teams published the results of the first real-world quantum computations. But the first quantum computers weren’t computers at all. They were biochemistry equipment, relying on the same science as MRI machines. Read More >>