internet
Former Cop in Australia Jailed for Using Police Databases to Look Up Tinder Dates

An ex-cop in Western Australia has been jailed for six months for using police databases to snoop on the records of dozens of women he’d encountered on dating sites like Tinder and PlentyOfFish, Australia’s ABC News reported on Friday. Read More >>

facial recognition
Man Hiding Face From Police Facial Recognition Test Fined for Telling Cops to ‘Piss Off’

On Thursday, Metropolitan Police trialled a face recognition system in the East London town of Romford. The technology led to three arrests, according to The Independent. One individual was fined after an altercation that reportedly stemmed from his response to the facial recognition technology. Read More >>

drones
Drone Expert Obviously Saw the Gatwick Shutdown Coming

A prominently placed industry insider within the drone universe saw all the Gatwick fuss coming, he says, adding that Gatwick should've done more to prevent the airport outage from happening and really ought to have got up and running again in less than three days. Read More >>

drones
Home Office Gives Police More Powers in War on Drones

Whoever had their fun with a drone at Gatwick is about to hand loads more anti-drone powers to the police, as the Home Office has announced the results of a consultation into What To Do About Drones. And the answer seems to be palm more controls off on to the police. Read More >>

drones
Gatwick Drone Investigators Say Some Drone Sightings May Have Been Good Police Anti-Drone Drones

Sussex police are laying the groundwork for declaring the Gatwick drone shutdown one of the most bizarre crimes of a very bizarre year, with investigators currently saying that some drone sightings may have been of the good kind of police drone that was launched to investigate the original reports of rogue manbaby toys buzzing the airport. Read More >>

artificial intelligence
Police Are Building an AI That Flags People for Crimes That Haven’t Happened Yet

Police in the UK are piloting a project that uses artificial intelligence to determine how likely someone is to commit or be a victim of a serious crime. These include crimes involving a gun or knife, as well as modern slavery, New Scientist reported on Monday. The hope is to use this information to detect potential criminals or victims and intervene with counsellors or social services before crimes take place. Read More >>

technology
The Police of the Future Were Going to Soar Over Traffic to Save Lives

In the 1950s and 60s, people were fascinated by the idea of flying cars and jetpacks that would let people soar above the traffic. But it wasn’t just the average commuter who was supposed to benefit from these space-age technologies. Emergency responders like police and ambulances were going to take to the skies to help save lives, like in this illustration from legendary retro-future artist Frank Tinsley. Read More >>

crime
Met Police Tell Women Not to Use Headphones Following a String of Sexual Assaults

After 10 women were assaulted in northwest London over the past nine months, local police are now urging women to not use headphones when they’re out walking alone. Read More >>

crime
Police Force Suggests Grassing up Neighbours Who Look Suspiciously Rich

A slightly odd campaign to grass up your friends and neighbours is being operated by Northamptonshire Police, with "Operation Bling" encouraging members of the public to be on the lookout for people being a bit too conspicuous with their consumption. The subtext being that some rough-looking bloke with a nice phone probably stole it or bought it with ill-gotten money. Read More >>

crime
Police Bored of Sorting Out Your Facebook Whines

The boss of the UK's Police Federation has been running the numbers down in the IT department, and has emerged horrified at how much time the police forces of the country are spending on sorting out boring old non-urgent social media bullshit. Read More >>

humour
Surrey Police Get ‘Youth Language Training’

Work-mandated training courses are undeniably dull, but this one, that police officers in Surrey are being given, might just be more entertaining than most. Officers are being taught 'youth language' – words and phrases that are used by youngsters that seem pretty foreign to anyone not fully 'down with the kids'. Read More >>

cars
Police Are Going to Start Testing Drivers’ Eyesight by the Side of the Road

If you get pulled over by the police, generally speaking they'll make sure the car you're driving is yours, that you have got a valid licence, and in some cases they'll test to make sure you're not too drunk to be legally driving. Now, though, they may be checking to see if your eyesight is good enough, because if it's not they'll be taking your driving licence off you. Read More >>

police
Police in Paraguay Discover Their Rifles Have Been Replaced With Toy Replicas

Last week, police officers in Paraguay found that at least 42 battle rifles had been stolen from their armoury and replaced with toy replicas. It’s unclear if a flag with the word “BANG!” written on it popped out of the barrels. Read More >>

amazon
Amazon Accidentally Makes Rock-Solid Case for Not Giving Its Face Recognition Tech to Police

Days after the ACLU released a damning report on Amazon’s face recognition product Rekognition, Amazon’s general manager of AI, Dr Matt Wood, countered its findings in a blog post. The ACLU used Rekognition to scan the faces of all 535 members of the US Congress, finding the software mistook 28 of them for suspected criminals. Dr Wood notes first that the ACLU doesn’t reveal its methodology or dataset in the report, then punctuates Amazon’s original response—that it encourages higher confidence thresholds for law enforcement. Read More >>

drones
Who Will Police Police Drones?

The US Police Foundation doesn’t want the police to call drones “drones.” Because of the public’s association with “military-style weapons like the Predator,” the organisation’s 311-page report reads, the term “drone” is “a major obstacle to law enforcement’s ability to convince the public” that police drone programs “could actually increase public safety, not jeopardise it.” Read More >>