science
Do You Want to Eat This New Caffeine-Catalysed Gel as Much as I Do?

Finally, scientists have delivered exactly what you’ve been asking for: an edible polymer gel made with caffeine. Finally. Read More >>

science
Someone Go Find a Practical Use for This Sweet Conductive Plastic

I’m not going to lie. Sometimes I see a science paper and think, dang, that’s really cool, I really wish it could do X. Like, maybe a major advancement in flexible, transparent plastic conductors could solve all of my cracked smartphone screen problems. Of course, things are more complex than just that, and a single new material won’t solve my concrete-induced woes. But this latest research definitely conjures some intriguing possibilities. Read More >>

science
This Sponge Could Help Fill Gaps Where Bone Can’t Regrow Itself

Your bones are masterful self-healers, but certain injuries and defects can leave a gap too wide for new bone cells to fill in. Texas A&M's Dr. Melissa Grunlan and team have come up with a solution, a biodegradable polymer sponge that supports new bone cell growth, then disappears as it's replaced by solid bone. Read More >>

science
IBM Lab Accidentally Makes New Type of Super-Strong, Recyclable Polymer

Strong, durable materials are hard to recycle—they're designed to stand up to abuse. But research chemists at an IBM laboratory just published their discovery of a never-before-seen family of polymers that's super strong, self-healing, lightweight, and easy to recycle. And it was discovered completely by accident. Read More >>

science
This Is the World’s First Working Cell Made From Plastic

Scientists have long been toiling to create artificial life, managing to produce man-made cell walls and even synthetic DNA. But now, a team of chemists has produced a functioning cell made from polymers. Read More >>

science
Science Makes a Circuit So Thin, it Can Sit On a Contact Lens

Flexible, stretchable, bendable circuits will make futuristic wearable devices and implantable medical sensors possible. Yesterday, a Swiss research team revealed a big new step in that field: a super-thin circuit that can function while wrapped around a human hair or laid on a contact lens. Read More >>