archaeology
Intense Heat From Ancient Vesuvius Eruption Caused Victims’ Skulls to Explode

During the Mount Vesuvius eruption of 79 AD, clouds of superheated gas enveloped the ancient city of Pompeii and its surrounding areas, instantly vaporising bodily fluids and soft tissues, according to new research. Sounds grim, but this mode of death was actually a blessing in disguise, given the alternatives. Read More >>

archaeology
Skull of Crushed Pompeii Victim Found ‘Intact’

Last month, archaeologists in Italy found the skeletal remains of a Pompeii resident who apparently had his head crushed by a giant rock while fleeing the eruption some 2,000 years ago. The victim’s skull has now been recovered, and its surprisingly pristine condition suggests an alternative cause of death. Read More >>

history
3D Modelling Reveals the Beauty of Pompeii Before Its Destruction

By combining archaeology with 3D computer modelling, European researchers have digitally reconstructed a house in Pompeii, showing how lavish and colourful these structures truly were before they were destroyed by a catastrophic volcanic eruption. Read More >>

history
Archaeologists Discover Skeletons in Ancient, Ransacked Pompeii Shop

Pompeii is already an archaeological gold mine, but a rare discovery this week in the ancient city has added to that collection. Read More >>

science
We Might Finally Be Able to Read Ancient Scrolls Damaged By Vesuvius Eruption

Pompeii has the best press, but the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in 79 AD also buried the town of Herculaneum. Charred scrolls were recovered from the town library in 1752, and Italian scientists just discovered it might be possible to use X-ray technology to read them. Their findings were published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read More >>

history
Pompeii’s Ruins are Being Wired Up By an “Electronic Warfare” Firm

The ruined city of Pompeii—its residents' bodies so famously and eerily preserved by the very volcanic ashes that fatally buried them nearly 2,000 years ago—has seen better days. With neither the budget nor the personnel to protect itself against invading hordes of international tourists, the city is at risk of damage, structural collapse, and petty vandalism. Worse, the very ground beneath it might be unstable, leading to a much more dangerous problem down the road. Read More >>

science
First Photos of China’s 298-Million-Year-Old Buried Forest

These are the first photos of some of the countless treasures found in the extraordinary 298-million-year-old forest discovered under coal mine in Wuda, Inner Mongolia, China. Read More >>