energy
Toyota CEO Predicted Peak Oil by 2020 Back in 2009

Toyota’s North American CEO, Jim Lentz, predicted back in 2009 that by 2020 the world would hit peak oil – the idea that the world’s demand for oil would exceed the world’s supply of oil. And since we’ve officially entered the year 2020, it feels like an appropriate time to look at whether his prediction was correct. Spoiler alert: It wasn’t. Read More >>

huawei
Huawei’s 2010 Concept Video About the Year 2020 is Super Awkward

When I was a kid, the year 2020 seemed so far away. But now that “the future” is almost here, it’s fun to look back at what we thought 2020 might look like. Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications company and a lightning rod for controversy in the U.S., had its own idea about what the year 2020 was going to entail. And let’s just say that it’s super awkward. Read More >>

amazon
Here’s What People Thought of Amazon When It First Launched in the Mid-1990s

Amazon was founded on July 5, 1994, and launched its online store in 1995, letting people buy books from the comfort of their homes. 25 years after its inception, Amazon now sells everything from taco holders shaped like dinosaurs to tongue brushes that humans can use to lick their cats. And you’d have to be living under a rock to not know about Amazon. Read More >>

music
Music Writer From 1999 Predicts What Bands Will Still Be Around in 2019

What musicians that you enjoy today will still be around in 20 years? It’s tough to say. But the good people of 1999 tried to predict just that in an article that might raise a few eyebrows here in the year 2019. Read More >>

advertising
This 1996 TV Advert Predicted What Sports Would Look Like in 2020

What did people of the past think sports would look like in the 21st century? They imagined humans powerlifting an entire tonne, hurdles that pop up taller as you move along the track, and swimming relay races with “dolphin style” moves against wave machines. At least that was the idea in this 1996 TV ad for the Gatorade knock-off All Sport. Read More >>

predictions
Kids of the 1980s Imagined the Year 2020 With Robot Butlers, Bubble-top Cities, and Nuclear War

Earlier this month we looked at predictions from kids at the turn of the 20th century. But what about more recently? Say, from the 1980s? Well, you’re in luck, because today we have predictions about the future from kids in 1984. And some of them are as dark and terrifying as you might guess for kids who were experiencing ever-present anxiety about the Cold War. Read More >>

history
Kids in 1904 Had Wild Predictions About the Future of 2019

What did kids from the year 1904 think would happen by the year 1919 or even the year 2019? They imagined fancy airships in the sky, “automobiles for everything,” and wondrous house-cleaning robots. They even imagined trips to Mars by the year 1919. Seriously. Read More >>

predictions
These Were the Jobs of the Future, According to Experts in 1988

Making predictions is hard, we all know that. But there’s one field where prediction can be even more difficult than prognostication about the houses we’ll be living in and the cars we’ll drive – the kinds of jobs we’ll have. Experts are always trying to figure out where society is heading and trying to determine what kind of new jobs people will be doing in the future. And those kinds of predictions always seem to bring out some of the nuttiest ideas when society doesn’t necessarily follow the path that people were expecting. Read More >>

history
Thomas Edison Predicted Nobody Would Be Able to Make Phone Calls Across the Atlantic Ocean

Never say never. Thomas Edison was both a great inventor and an amusing prognosticator. But nobody, no matter how smart, knows the future. And that goes for Edison as well. Back in 1894, Edison predicted that transatlantic phone calls would be impossible. But his doubts would prove silly roughly 30 years later when the first transatlantic phone call was completed in 1927. Read More >>

history
This 1966 Article About ‘Computer Danger’ Predicted a Bleak Future of Bank Crimes and Info Leaks

When it comes to high-tech surveillance, identity theft, and financial crimes, humanity lives in a hell of its own making. Technology here in the second decade of the 21st century has created a world where our personal information is constantly getting exposed. And for what benefit? The “convenience” of being able to pay our bills online. But we can’t say we weren’t warned. People in 1966 saw where all of this automation was heading. Read More >>

predictions
Predictions for the Year 2018 From the 20th Century

It’s the year 2018. And while we have some very cool tech that we take for granted, we’re still waiting on quite a few things that we were promised. But what did the people of yesteryear imagine 2018 would be like? Read More >>

year 2000
The Year 2000 Is Officially Retro

I’m calling it. The year 2000 is officially retro. Fight me. Read More >>

netflix
Stranger Things Is Ruining Netflix for Me

In theory, one of the best things about living in 2017 is that we have over a century of recorded entertainment that we can enjoy virtually anytime we like. But in practice, we’re still not there. And it’s all because video streaming services like Netflix only care about signing up new customers who just want completely new content like Stranger Things. That singled-minded drive is ruining Netflix. Read More >>

business
Jack Ma Predicts People Will Work Just 16 Hours Per Week by 2047

Jack Ma, the billionaire businessman and chairman of the Alibaba Group, believes that automation will help workers of the future enjoy more leisure time. In fact, he sees a future where people will be working just 16 hours per week by 2047. Read More >>

money
Canadian Article From 1981 Predicted the Gender Pay Gap Would Disappear by 2017

The gender pay gap is pretty striking in most parts of the world. In the US, women make 80 cents for every dollar a man makes. In Canada, it’s 73 cents. But back in the early 1980s, some foresaw the complete disappearance of that gap, specifically by the year 2017. Read More >>