surveillance
Researchers Develop Tech That Lets Surveillance Cameras Text to Say Hello 

Researchers at Purdue University in America have found a new way to get surveillance cameras to “talk” to the people they see. The system is called PHADE, which stands for “private human addressing,” and it enables cameras to send messages to people’s devices when they’ve entered a specific area without collecting their personal data. Read More >>

surveillance
Australia Scraps Plans for National Biometric Crime Database

The Australian government is ending its plans for a national biometric database meant to help police departments track suspects and other persons of interest, the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission announced Friday. Surveillance and security company NEC was awarded the contract in 2016, but after a third-party audit found the project had nearly doubled its budget, ACIC terminated the contact. Read More >>

privacy
GDPR is Killing Email Marketing, to the Disappointment of No One

For the past month or so, inboxes the world over have been awash with emails about updated privacy policies and new permissions required by the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). You probably haven’t been reading those emails, and that’s bad news for email marketers. Read More >>

snapchat
Snap Begins Mission to Infiltrate Other Apps, Swears It Won’t Screw Up With Your Data Like Facebook Did

Snap Inc. announced today that it’s releasing a new developer kit that embeds Snapchat’s signature features like bitmoji and stickers into other apps. Reports of Snap Kit leaked last month, but this is the official confirmation. Read More >>

privacy
Spain’s Biggest Football App Reportedly Turned Fans Into Unwitting Narcs

With the World Cup just a few days away, everyone is trying to figure out the best ways to watch and keep track of their favourite teams. But before you download any apps, here’s something to think about: The La Liga app, which is the official streaming app for Spain’s most popular football league, has reportedly been using the microphones on fans’ phones to root out unauthorised broadcasts of matches in public venues like bars and restaurants. Read More >>

privacy
Weight Watchers Swears No Customer Data Exposed After Dozens of Servers Found Publicly Accessible

Dozens of servers containing Weight Watcher’s data were left exposed after the company failed to password protect software used for managing application containers, according to German cybersecurity firm Kromtech. Read More >>

facebook
Surprise, Facebook Reportedly Gave Companies Your Friends’ Data After it Said it Wouldn’t

Stop me if you’ve heard this one before, but it looks like Facebook may have been sharing more of your data than you thought it was. The Wall Street Journal reported Friday that the social network cut deals with a number of companies to provide access to user records and friend data even after its policy change that prevented apps from scraping that very information. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Says a ‘Bug’ Changed Millions of Users’ Default Privacy Settings to Public

For ten days in May, a Facebook “bug” changed the default privacy settings of new posts for as many as 14 million users, Recode reports. As a result, posts meant to be shared privately may have instead been shared publicly. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Is Trying to Kill Its New Privacy Scandal on a Technicality

Ever since the Cambridge Analytica scandal first broke in March, Facebook has been scrambling to change its policies and reassure the public that it no longer recklessly shares data with third parties. But late last weekend we learned that it has quietly been giving device makers access to users' data this whole time. It argues this was different for several reasons and device makers could only use the data to provide “the Facebook experience.” Read More >>

apple
I’ll Believe Apple Is Killing Anti-Encryption Tools When They Actually Do It

Among the blizzard of news bits from Apple’s WWDC, a much-anticipated feature has returned to the beta for iOS 12: a mode for keeping law enforcement snoopers out of your phone. The feature has come and gone in the past, but it’s looking more real and better than ever this time around. Still, I’ll believe it when it’s actually live. Read More >>

surveillance
Indian College Puts Surveillance Cameras in Men’s Toilets to Deter Cheating

Law students in India were horrified to learn CCTV surveillance cameras had been installed in men’s bathrooms at Dharam Samaj Degree College. The college installed them in men’s toilets nearest the classrooms conducting entrance exams for law and business degrees. Read More >>

watch this
This Man’s A Cappella Rendition of the THX Logo Theme Will Take You Back to a Long Time Ago…

Before the InceptionBwomp,” the THX “Deep Note” was the most recognisable and inscrutable sound in cinema. For its 35th anniversary, THX released the official sheet music for that warm wall of sound—so now it’s time for the internet to take a crack at recreating it. Everyone is going to have a hard time doing a better job than this dude and his vocal chords. Read More >>

privacy
Tech Support Scammers Use Victims’ Webcams to Secretly Record ‘Testimonials’ for YouTube

A team of scammers sneakily filmed dozens of Australians by remotely accessing their webcams, then uploaded those videos onto YouTube, according to Australian news outlet ABC. Read More >>

apple
Apple Declares War on ‘Browser Fingerprinting,’ the Sneaky Tactic That Tracks You in Incognito Mode

Apple is rolling out some new and much-welcomed privacy protections for Safari that it says will prevent third parties from tracking you, particularly when you’re already doing everything you can to fly under the radar. Read More >>

security
Australian Bank Sends 10,000 Customers’ Data to Wrong Email Address for Dumbest Possible Reason

There are plenty of ways to unintentionally mishandle customer data. Storing information on an unsecured server, for instance, or being targeted by state-sponsored actors. But perhaps the most egregiously idiotic way to release confidential information is to send emails to the wrong domain name. That’s exactly what the largest bank in Australia did—more than 600 times. Read More >>