amazon
Your Worst Alexa Nightmares Are Coming True

What’s the most terrifying thing you can imagine an Amazon Echo doing? Think realistically. Would it be something simple but sinister, like artificially intelligent speaker recording a conversation between you and a loved one and then sending that recording to an acquaintance? That seems pretty bad to me. And guess what: it’s happening. Read More >>

privacy
How to Download Your Data With All the Fancy New GDPR Tools

The big new European data-privacy law known as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is here, and it’s ushered in a host of changes to the way companies treat your personal information. Read More >>

privacy
Facebook and Google Accused of Violating GDPR on First Day of the New European Privacy Law

When Mark Zuckerberg testified in front of members of the European Parliament on Tuesday, he insisted that Facebook was ready for Friday, the day when the European Unions’s strict new data privacy law went into effect. But users in Europe have already filed complaints against Facebook and others, saying the tech companies are in violation of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). Read More >>

amazon
Amazon Confirms Alexa Heard a Couple’s Background Conversation as a Command to Record Them

Two weeks ago, a woman in Portland, Oregon in the US learned that her Amazon Echo device had recorded and sent a private conversation between her and her husband to one of his employees in Seattle, Washington without their knowledge. “Unplug your Alexa devices right now,” she says the employee told them, “You’re being hacked.” Read More >>

privacy
Dozens of American News Sites Blocked in Europe as GDPR Goes Into Effect Today

The European Union’s digital privacy law, known as the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), officially went into effect today. But some websites in the U.S. have decided to block their services entirely rather than adhere to the new regulations. Dozens of American newspapers are currently blocked in Europe and web services like Instapaper have suspended operations in the European Union for the foreseeable future. Read More >>

privacy
Facebook and Google Already Have GDPR Complaints Over ‘Forced Consent’

The EU's General Data Protection Regulation goes live today, after what feels like a lifetime of build up. There hasn't been much time wasted in filing complaints, however, since dedicated Facebook privacy critic Max Schrems has already filed complaints levelled at Google and Facebook. Read More >>

privacy
Instapaper Is Blocking Users in Europe Until It Figures Out New Privacy Rules

Instapaper has informed its European users that it will temporarily cut off their access to the platform starting today. The reason? This Pinterest-owned service needs more than the two years it had to comply with the European Union’s new batch of privacy rules that go into effect on 25 May. Sorry, Europe! Read More >>

apple
Apple Is Going to Let You Download All the Data it Collects About You

Today, Apple announced a new privacy website to help users better navigate just how much of their data is collected by the company. Read More >>

facebook
Mark Zuckerberg Played Parliament for Fools and They’re Pissed

For a moment, Mark Zuckerberg’s appearance before members of the European Parliament looked like it was going to be a very bad day for the Facebook CEO. Then he started answering questions, a flood of pablum spewed from his mouth, and everyone got angry. Read More >>

privacy
Google is Being Sued in the High Court for “Clandestine” Tracking of iOS Users

On of Google's mottos is "Don't Be Evil". Or at least it was, until they changed it to the slightly more subjective "Do the Right Thing". Some would argue that the company's past behaviour does border on being evil, which is why the company is being sued in the High Court in a class-action lawsuit described as "the first of its kind" in the UK. The reason? Allegedly bypassing security restrictions in iOS's Safari browser for "clandestine tracking". Read More >>

ai
Chinese School Piloting Face-Recognition Software to Make Sure Students Pay Attention in Class

At least one school in China is trying out face recognition software that scans students’ faces to check if they’re paying attention in class, Epoch Times reports. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook’s New Youth Portal Is a Way Better Resource for Adults

Today Facebook debuted its Youth Portal, a subsite featuring dozens of quick explainers on its privacy and data collection policies, as well as general tips for using social media. It’s actually a great resource for adults. The sections are concisely written, with cute emoji that sort of look like updated versions of Clippy—a reference surely none of the Youth will get. Read More >>

amazon
Amazon Echo That Records Kids Draws Concern From U.S. Lawmakers

U.S. lawmakers are raising concerns over the Amazon Echo Kids Edition, a hands-free, voice-controlled hockey puck of a device that reads bedtime stories, plays Disney tunes, and programs our offspring to be tactful and courteous when interacting with artificial intelligent machines — a useful survival skill to impart in advance of humanity’s impending subservience to the cybernetic authoritarian regime that shall one day enslave us all. Read More >>

apple
Apple Is Reportedly Cracking Down on Apps That Covertly Share Your Location Data

At a time when every tech company is desperate to avoid news that third-parties got their hands on user data without their knowledge, Apple is reportedly cracking down on app developers who have been transmitting users’ locations without their consent. The practice has long been part of Apple’s guidelines, but apparently wasn’t being properly enforced. Read More >>

privacy
Signal’s Disappearing Messages Have a Huge Flaw on Macs

A bevy of secure messaging options exist to serve the needs of whistleblowers, journalists, and those wanting greater privacy in general, and among them Signal has become one of the most trusted. It even comes baked in with “disappearing” messages that users can set to self-destruct anywhere from five seconds to one week after they’re checked. Read More >>