science
The Unlikely Origins of the First Quantum Computer

Within days of each other back in 1998, two teams published the results of the first real-world quantum computations. But the first quantum computers weren’t computers at all. They were biochemistry equipment, relying on the same science as MRI machines. Read More >>

quantum computing
We Must Prepare Now for Quantum Attacks, National Academy of Sciences Warns

The road ahead is rocky for those hoping to build quantum computers, according to a new report from the National Academy of Sciences. But as these computers become possible, the government should prioritize preparing for the potential consequences, which could be dire for cybersecurity. Read More >>

quantum computers
Blockchain Is Especially at Risk for Quantum Attacks, Scientists Warn

Blockchain is meant to be secure – but a new paper from quantum computing scientists warns that quickly advancing quantum technology poses a vulnerability for the much-hyped blockchain. Read More >>

internet
Scientists Worldwide Are Getting Serious About Quantum Internet

It takes little more than logging on to see the flaws in today’s internet—mainly, how easy it is to steal or intercept data. One future solution for these problems could be an upgrade that relies on the latest advances in the science of subatomic particles: a quantum internet. Read More >>

quantum computing
There’s Now a Proven Way for Quantum Computers to Beat Classical Computers – With a Catch

Entrepreneurs and physicists are pursuing a new kind of computer—one based on the physics of the subatomic particles—that promises to revolutionise various fields. Presumably, such a quantum computer should offer some advantage over the classical computers we already use, right? The trouble is, it’s unclear what tasks quantum computers can definitively perform better than regular computers. Read More >>

science
How Quantum Memory Could Change Computing

In a hot tub in 2012, physicist Seth Lloyd pitched a quantum internet application to Google’s Sergey Brin and Larry Page. He called it Quoogle: a search engine that, using mathematics based on the physics of subatomic particles, returns results without ever actually knowing the query. Such an advance would require an entirely new kind of memory, called qRAM, or quantum random access memory. Read More >>

google
Google’s New Cirq Project Aims to Make Quantum Computers Actually Useful

Early this year, we reported that a new era of quantum computing is upon us: the NISQ, or Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum era, in which quantum computers are still small and error prone, but they actually do something valuable. That second part is still somewhat aspirational, though, so companies like Google are offering frameworks so the public can develop useful algorithms for quantum computers. Read More >>

computing
A Spooky Quantum Experiment Creates What May Be the Most Entangled Controllable Device Yet

If you’ve read anything about quantum computers, you may have encountered the statement, “It’s like computing with zero and one at the same time.” That’s sort of true, but what makes quantum computers exciting is something spookier: entanglement. Read More >>

science
What’s With All The Dental Floss in IBM’s Quantum Computers?

On a large plot of land beneath circling turkey vultures an hour north of New York City sits a crescent-shaped building. Inside of it are some of the world’s most cutting-edge quantum computers, stored in dilution refrigerators about the right size to hold an adult human. And beside one of those setups, atop a large plastic roller, was REACH dental floss—a crucial scientific tool. Read More >>

science
IBM Announces Two Fancy New Quantum Computers

IBM has announced two powerful new quantum computer processors, one client-ready and another in the works. Read More >>

computers
There’s Now a Real Quantum Computer That Anyone Can Use Remotely

For decades, quantum computing has been the preserve of research labs. But now IBM has made its working prototype quantum computer accessible via the internet — and literally anyone can use it. Read More >>

science
IBM Just Cracked One of the Biggest Problems Facing Quantum Computing

Quantum computing could make hyper-complex calculations trivial — but it’s currently fraught with problems. Now, though, IBM has solved one of the biggest, allowing it to detect the internal errors that could otherwise render quantum calculation useless. Read More >>

uncategorized
Researchers Have Solved One of Quantum Computing’s Biggest Problems

Like graphene, quantum computing is an exciting but endlessly elusive technological promise. One of the reasons—among many—that quantum computers aren't exactly a reality yet is that we haven't been able to effectively spot errors in quantum computations. Not until now, anyway. Read More >>

science
Why Programming a Quantum Computer Is So Damn Hard

Someday, somehow, quantum computing is going to change the world as we know it. Even the lamest quantum computer is orders of magnitude more powerful than anything we could ever make today. But figuring out how to program one is ridiculously hard. Read More >>