Google Unveils Largest Quantum Computer Yet, but So What?

Google announced its newest 72-qubit quantum computer, called Bristlecone, at a conference and in a blog post yesterday. That’s a big step over the competition—but how big a deal is it? Read More >>

Heaviest Element Should Completely Subvert the Rules of High School Chemistry

At the bottom right-hand corner of the periodic table sits a fantasy world. Until recently, these elusive elements’ names were just fancy translations of their numbers. They’re enormous and can only be produced in the lab. They only stick around for a few seconds at most before radioactively decaying into smaller elements. Read More >>

All the Wild Shit We’re Going to Do in Space and Physics in 2018

It’s time to gaze into our crystal ball and see what the coming year has in store for science. From powerful new rockets and asteroid-sampling spacecraft to groundbreaking particle physics, there’s plenty to look forward to in 2018. Read More >>

Two Incredible New Quantum Machines Have Made Actual Science Discoveries

There’s a nebulous concept that’s floating around the public conscious, called quantum advantage or quantum supremacy. One of these days, someone is going to boldly declare that they’ve created a quantum computer that can solve some complex problem that a regular computer can’t. Read More >>

Twitter Rewards Bad Behaviour, Says Twitter Co-Founder

Why does the internet feel so fundamentally broken? Ev Williams, the co-founder of Twitter, Medium, and Blogger, gave his two cents while speaking with CNN Money today. Read More >>

IBM’s Latest Quantum Computer Does Record-Breaking Chemistry

As cool as they sound, quantum computers will probably not be best suited for designing websites or making pretty word processors. Instead, their quirky bits may one day be used to solve special algorithms, for artificial intelligence applications, or to model things that actually follow the wild rules of quantum physics. One day. Read More >>

Physicists Use Lasers to Set Up First Underwater Quantum Communications Link

Quantum mechanics may force you to think some wild things about the way the Universe works, but it has some real applications. One of the theory’s main quirks allows for a special kind of quantum link, one that can send incredibly secure messages or transmit data for quantum computing. Tests of these links exist on Earth, in space, and now, underwater. Read More >>

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Watch the World’s Worst Child Ninja Try to Disable His Dad’s Home Security Cam

Because they use wide-angle lenses, home security cameras are able to capture much more of the scene than a conventional camera can. This is the kind of info you might wanna know before you try to secretly turn off one your dad has set up in the living room, as one YouTube user’s son recently tried—and utterly failed—to do. Read More >>

Basic Assumptions of Physics Might Require the Future to Influence the Past

One of the most well-accepted physical theories makes no logical sense. Quantum mechanics, the theory that governs the smallest possible spaces, forces our human brains to accept some really wacky, uncomfortable realities. Maybe we live in a world where certain observations can force our universe to branch into multiple ones. Or maybe actions in the present influence things earlier in time. Read More >>

Experiment With Chinese Satellite Demonstrates Quantum Weirdness Over Record Distances

Quantum mechanics is weird as hell, where the rules of the world you experience don’t apply. Even at distances a thousand kilometres apart, particles seem to be able to communicate with each other. Read More >>

Scientists Finally Observed Time Crystals—But What the Hell Are They?

The Harvard team’s time crystal (Image: Soonwon Choi)

This Book is a Breathtaking Introduction to the Nature of Reality

A fabric that bends and ripples under the weight of the stars. A clock that runs slower perched high in the mountains. Objects that only exist when they’re being watched. Endless tiny particles, swarming restlessly in the void. Read More >>

Physicists Prove That ‘Spooky Action at a Distance’ is Real

Entanglement is one of the strangest aspects of quantum mechanics, whereby two subatomic particles can be so closely connected that one can seem to influence the other even across long distances. Albert Einstein dubbed it “spooky action at a distance,” and two new experiments have now definitively shown that the phenomenon is real. Read More >>

A New Way of Thinking About Spacetime That Turns Everything Inside Out

One of the weirdest aspects of quantum mechanisms is entanglement, because two entangled particles affecting each other across vast distances seems to violate a fundamental principle of physics called locality: things that happen at a particular point in space can only influence the points closest to it. But what if locality — and space itself — is not so fundamental after all? Author George Musser explores the implications in his new book, 'Spooky Action At a Distance'. Read More >>