science
Common Bricks May Record Evidence of Nuclear Weapons

Researchers have long studied retrospective dosimetry—looking at what kind of radiation was present in a room based on the signature left over in the environment. Frequently, this requires lots of treatment and work. One team of researchers at North Carolina State University thinks they have a simple way to detect the leftover radiation simply by taking a core of material out of a brick. Something like this could be important for things like nuclear weapons inspections. Read More >>

science
Scientists Will Transport Antimatter in a Truck

The antimatter of science fiction vastly differs from the real-life antimatter of particle physics. The former powers spaceships or bombs, while the latter is just another particle that physicists study, one that happens to be the mirror image with the opposite charge of the more familiar particles. Read More >>

north korea
Living in North Korea, It Seems, May Be Bad for Your Health

At least four defectors from North Korea’s Kilju County, the location of the pariah government’s notorious Punggye-ri nuclear test site, have tested positive for symptoms of radiation exposure, the New York Times reported on Wednesday. Read More >>

north korea
North Korean Defectors Say Radiation Is Leaking From Punggye-ri Nuclear Test Site

North Korea’s infamous nuclear test site, a facility in Punggye-ri in Kilju County, has long been reported to maintain the standards one might expect for a pariah government low on everything but zeal and weaponry. Outsiders can only get a limited picture of the country, let alone the test site, thanks to its isolation from the rest of the world. But concerns have included tunnel collapses at the facility and the possibility Mount Mantap, where it is located, could implode under stress from repeated nuclear tests and release large amounts of radiation. Read More >>

health
Nuclear Fallout Declared Only as Bad For You as London’s Air Pollution

A team of researchers looking into the niche world of what happens after a nuclear accident have some good news. They say we shouldn't all be evacuated, as evacuation leads to stress and stress is bad in itself. Also, we'd only be likely to lose a few months off our lives as a result of the exposure to radioactive matter, which is about the same end result as choosing to live in a polluted metropolis for your productive youthful years. Read More >>

environment
‘Harmless’ Radioactive Cloud Drifts Over Europe Following Mysterious Nuclear Accident

The cloud of radiation that swept through Europe in recent weeks originated at a nuclear facility in either Russia or Kazakhstan, according to a report put out by France’s nuclear safety institute. The levels of radiation were never dangerous—at least for Europeans living outside of the immediate area affected—but the exact cause of the incident is still unknown. Read More >>

space
Scientists Propose a New Way to Test How Space Radiation Will Fry You

You’re probably aware of some of the challenges of sending astronauts to space. Getting to space, that’s one for sure. But there’s another insidious effect you might not think of: Tissue damage from radiation. Read More >>

space
Humans Heading to Mars Could Face a Disturbingly High Cancer Risk

Practically everyone who likes space and has lots of money is trying to get to Mars in the near future. But before anyone reaches the Red Planet, there are plenty of concerns to mull over, most notably that our bodies were not built to live in a barren litter box with a thin atmosphere. But the journey to Mars is an equal concern. An unnerving new study suggests that the trip to Mars could put passengers at a higher risk to develop cancer—possibly two times greater than what experts previously thought. Read More >>

animals
Wild Boars Remain at Radiation-Hit Fukushima as Residents Prepare to Return

In just a few weeks, the residents of a Fukushima city will finally be allowed to return to their homes. Trouble is, the place has been overrun by hundreds of belligerent and potentially radioactive wild boars, prompting public safety concerns. Read More >>

energy
Excessive Radiation Inside Fukushima Fries Clean-up Robot

The robot was sent into reactor No. 2 to inspect and clean a passage for another robot in the damaged nuclear facility. Image: TEPCO/Associated Press
A remotely-controlled robot sent to inspect and clean a damaged reactor at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant had to be pulled early when its onboard camera went dark, the result of excess radiation. The abbreviated mission suggests that radiation levels inside the reactor are even higher than was reported last week—and that robots are going to have a hell of a time cleaning this mess up. Read More >>

energy
Radiation Levels Are Soaring Inside the Damaged Fukushima Nuclear Plant

Radiation levels inside a damaged reactor at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear plant have hit a record high, and are the worst since the plant suffered a triple meltdown nearly six years ago. The latest readings now pose a serious challenge as officials prepare to dismantle the stricken facility. Read More >>

science
A Promising New Method For Cleaning Up the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster

Hundreds of millions of gallons of radioactive water remain sitting around the site of the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan. But scientists can’t simply dump the liquid into the ocean, and if it continues sitting around, it could seep into the soil. Read More >>

research
Ingenious New Camera Can Read Closed Books

In a breakthrough that will appeal to both spies and those who work with priceless but frail historical documents, researchers at MIT have developed a camera that uses terahertz radiation to peer at the text on pages of a book, without it having to be open. Read More >>

science
New Thing MXene Can Block Mobile Radiation

MXene is a thing that sounds a bit like current-gen wonderthing graphene, in that it's a virtually 2D combination of titanium and carbon that can be rolled out of the machines at a thickness of just one nanometre. And that's enough to block mobile phone radiation, and therefore protect the sperm counts of the next generation of male youths if it can be incorporated into the trousers pockets of the future. Read More >>

photography
What a Radioactive Town Looks Like Five Years After the Humans Left

Since March 2011, a 30-mile radius around the ruined Fukushima Daiichi reactor has been a designated exclusion zone, unsafe to travel. Over 100,000 evacuees left in a hurry and left behind a snapshot of what life looked like in the moments just before they fled. A brave soul recently snuck in to photograph the apocalyptic scene today. Read More >>