history
Thomas Edison Predicted Nobody Would Be Able to Make Phone Calls Across the Atlantic Ocean

Never say never. Thomas Edison was both a great inventor and an amusing prognosticator. But nobody, no matter how smart, knows the future. And that goes for Edison as well. Back in 1894, Edison predicted that transatlantic phone calls would be impossible. But his doubts would prove silly roughly 30 years later when the first transatlantic phone call was completed in 1927. Read More >>

history
This Futuristic Colour TV Set Concept From 1922 Was Way Ahead of Its Time

I’m pretty obsessed with the ideas that illustrators, writers, and technologists had for television in the 1920s. It was a decade when radio broadcasting went from niche to mainstream. So the ideas that people had for TV, before the first successful TV transmission was demonstrated in 1925, look like amazing contraptions that stretched the sci-fi imagination. Read More >>

police
This Was the Radio-Equipped Policeman of the Future in 1934

If you’ve seen any old gangster movies, you’re probably familiar with the phrase: “Calling all cars, calling all cars!” It became a cliche for when police headquarters sent out an alert via radio. But radio hasn’t been around forever. And at the dawn of radio technology, there were some pretty goofy-looking devices anticipated for the policeman of the future. Read More >>

technology
Trevor Baylis, Inventor of the Hand-Cranked Radio, Dies at 80

The hand-cranked radio allows people in remote communities to have access to modern broadcasting—all without needing an external power source, aside from your own hand. The technology’s inventor, Trevor Baylis, died today at the age of 80. The death of Baylis was announced by David Bunting, the chief executive of Trevor Baylis Brands, according to The Guardian. Read More >>

history
This Was the Futuristic Police Line-Up of 1931

In the 1930s, audio tech nerds were tinkering with everything. The most futuristic model homes of the day were wired for sound in every room, home audio recording was being introduced, and the LP was invented to use as audiobooks for the blind. And even things we’d consider mundane today got the radio treatment in order to make them high-tech. One of those things was the police line-up, seen above wired for sound in 1931. Read More >>