science
Smog-Filtering Screens Will Make Our Polluted Future Slightly More Tolerable

As our newly-elected leaders do everything they can to roll back environmental regulations, the future is looking more and more like a smog-filled dystopia. But not all scientific progress has ground to a halt. Scientists at National University of Singapore have created a transparent smog-filtering window screen that could make our lives a little less wheezy. Read More >>

science
A New Technique Captures Stunning Timelapse Footage of the Smallest Living Things

Microscopes let us observe some of the smallest objects in our universe, but with limitations when it comes to movements that can take hours, days, even weeks to play out. So a team of Austrian scientists developed new software that allows microscopes to not only track a slowly-moving object, but also capture incredible timelapse footage, speeding up the action. Read More >>

robots
Rapping Robots Prove at Least One Job is Safe From the Coming Android Apocalypse

Every day there’s a new robot with improved capabilities that promises to eventually take over yet another job. But if you’re heading off to college soon, and want to ensure you’ve selected a career path that’s safe from robo-replacement, this agonisingly awkward video seems to confirm that rapping is not something robots will be good at for a long time. Probably ever, actually. Read More >>

hackers
Hackers Can Now Use Sound Waves to Take Control of Your Smartphone

There’s an old mantra in the security world that anything can be hacked. And the more complex our devices become, the more methods hackers dream up to break into them. Case in point: A team of researchers can use sound waves to control anything from a smartphone (seriously) to a car (theoretically). Read More >>

science
Scientists Made the Perfect Underwater Glue By Stealing an Idea From Shellfish

Even the strongest artificial glues are completely useless when you try to apply them underwater, but somehow shellfish are able to hold fast to rocks to deter predators from trying to carry them away. Clearly, nature has already figured out how to make glues that work underwater, and now researchers may have discovered the secret. Read More >>

research
Surprise! Video Games Still Don’t Make You Violent

Researchers in Germany recently conducted a study using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on long-term players of violent video games. They set out to prove their hypothesis that gamers have reduced empathy when compared to non-gamers because of, you know, the violent video games. Read More >>

3d printing
A 3D-Printed, PIN-Protected Door Lock Won’t Protect Your Home But it Definitely Looks Cool

3D printers may have failed as a home appliance, but researchers at the Hasso-Plattner-Institut aren’t ready to give up on them just yet. Last year they successfully 3D-printed a working door handle without any moving parts, and this year they’re following it up with a 3D-printed, PIN-protected door lock. Read More >>

robots
You Can Shame This Robot With Your Mind When It Screws Up

Like a dog obsessively watching its owners for signs it’s a good pup, researchers at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) and Boston University are now using mind-mapping techniques to help train robots to perform tasks correctly. Read More >>

design
Coloured Light Makes This Magical Origami Fold Itself One Step at a Time

Much like cassette tapes, land lines, and broadcast TV, one day, “some assembly required” might be a phrase that’s completely foreign to kids, as researchers at North Carolina State University take another important step toward creating objects that can automatically assemble themselves. Read More >>

research
Study Finds Disturbing Conclusion About ‘Revenge Porn’ But Experts Are Dubious

The result of a new study from the University of Kent may surprise you. Researchers surveyed 100 adults, ages 18 to 54, on their feelings about revenge porn, which the researchers defined as “the act of sharing intimate, sexually graphic images and/or videos of another person onto public online platforms, such as Facebook.” Read More >>

science
Your Teeth Are Helping Scientists Build Better Airplanes

You might not think that the teeth in your mouth have much in common with the massive fangs you’ll find in a T-rex skull. But at the microscopic level, the core structure of tooth enamel hasn’t changed much over the ages. So, scientists are once again copying a tried-and-true Mother Nature design to potentially improve the strength and safety of airplanes. Read More >>

research
Solar Panels That Can Get Energy From Raindrops

Imagine a solar panel that generates energy not just from the sun, but also from the rain that hits it. Read More >>

robots
Robotics Researchers Discovered a Better Way For Insects to Walk

A popular approach to designing robots that can navigate a world built for living creatures is to simply copy Mother Nature’s designs. But while trying to improve how a six-legged robot walks, researchers at the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne actually found a faster way for six-legged creatures to get around. Read More >>

research
Disney Develops a Method for Wirelessly Powering an Entire Room

Free-roaming wireless power has been a dream of engineers since the days of Tesla and Edison waging their war of innovation, but a number of technical hurdles have prevented it from becoming a reality. The folks at Disney Research have revealed that they’ve successfully built a method to provide full coverage of an average room and power all the devices one might need. Read More >>

science
Dildos Are Safer Than Dolls, Says Swedish Study

The Swedish Chemicals Agency (SCA) has found that more children's toys than sex toys contain banned chemicals. Their research showed that while just 2% of the imported sex toys studied contained dodgy substances, the figure for children's toys was much higher at 15%. Read More >>