toys
After 60 Years, Brio Has Reinvented Its Toy Trains for the Future

Brio’s magnetic wooden trains are as iconic a toy as Lego bricks or Hot Wheels cars. Traditionally kid-powered, a few years ago electric motors were introduced to the line, but this year Brio trains are being upgraded with smart features that allow them to interact with tracks and playsets. Don’t hit the panic alarm just yet, though; Brio’s SmartTech toys aren’t going to rob your kids of their imagination-driven adventures. Read More >>

china
China to Make RFID Chips Mandatory in Cars So the Government Can Track Citizens on the Road

The Chinese government, in its ongoing pursuit to create the dystopian police state dreamed up in many a science fiction tale, is reportedly readying a new vehicle identification system that will be capable of monitoring the movement of citizens. Read More >>

biohacking
I Spent a Weekend With Cyborgs, and Now I Have an RFID Implant I Have No Idea What to Do With

Jeffrey Tibbetts prepped for implantation and scrubbed in, methodically sudsing up to his elbows, scraping the dirt from under his fingernails and scouring his hands with a rough brush to render his body sterile before donning a pair of beige latex surgical gloves. Read More >>

amazon
Amazon Tests Supermarket With No Checkout

Amazon just officially announced its long rumoured supermarket, and it actually looks quite cool. The concept is that there’s no place to checkout. You just tap your phone on some sort of detector when you walk in and then walk out with your food. Once you’ve left, you are billed through your Amazon account. Read More >>

transport
Why on Earth is an Airline Spending £34 Million on Bag-Tracking Technology?

The US’s busiest airline just spent $50 million (£34m) on tech that promises to more efficiently route your checked luggage to its destination. By the end of the year, all Delta Airlines flights will be tracking bags using RFID, or radio frequency identification. But can RFID really solve one of the most annoying things about air travel? Read More >>

gadgets
This 21st Century Cat Hunts For RFID-Tagged Prey

Outdoor cats get to massacre untold millions of mice per year, but indoor cats have to make do with balls of yarn and laser pointers. To try and bridge the gap, one man built a machine that would only feed his purring pal when he ‘hunts’ down an RFID-chipped plastic ball. Read More >>

amazon
Amazon’s Shop of the Future Was Outlined in 2006

Amazon recently filed an interesting patent that describes a system that lets shoppers bag what they want and walk out without paying, using complicated things like computers and maps to know it was you and that you need billing for it all at some point. Read More >>

uncategorized
This Stamp-Sized Sensor Can Sniff Out Explosives Using RFID Tags

Detecting explosives is, obviously, an important task – but many of the sensors are large and require manual operation. So GE's tiny and affordable new RFID sensor could help automate the process, to help keep us safe without much in the way of man power. Read More >>

guns
This Watch-Controlled Smart Pistol Aims to Make Owning a Gun Safer

Last week, a gun shop in California introduced a new addition to its stock: A .22-caliber pistol that only works when the user is wearing the accompanying RFID-enabled watch. It's being heralded as the "iPhone of guns." Read More >>

science
Australia is Outfitting Thousands of Bees with Tiny Tracking Backpacks

Bees populations are mysteriously dying worldwide, and that's a problem: one-third of the world's crops are pollenated by the black and yellow fellows. To try and figure out what's causing the bee decline, Australia's national science agency is strapping RFID tags on bees' backs to detect changes in their movement. Read More >>

science
GM’s RFID Engine Bolts Prevent Assembly Line Screw-Ups

hreaded fasteners haven't changed drastically since they were invented ages ago. But now, General Motors has put RFID tags in the bolts used on engine assembly lines, turning simple hardware into tracking devices that make sure everything gets assembled properly. That bolt's got a (2kb) brain! Read More >>

transport
Can Radar and RFID Stop Drivers From Killing Cyclists?

Last month, London reached a grim milestone: Six cyclists were killed within 14 days, sparking a massive "die-in" protest. London isn't alone; 176 cyclists or pedestrians were killed in NYC last year. The rapidly rising death toll is spurring a race to build a technology to warn drivers before they hit someone on foot or bike. Read More >>

research
Simply Shaking Two Devices to Pair Them Makes NFC Look Old-Fashioned

There's a flood of new smartwatches and other wearable devices coming just around the corner, and every one of them will require a connection to your smartphone. Wireless NFC technology has already made things a little easier when it comes to pairing, but researchers at Disney want to make things even easier by just having you shake a couple of devices in unison. Read More >>

booze
Who Needs a Breathalyser When a Urinal Can Tell How Drunk You Are?

Here's a brilliant idea that could prevent countless drunk driving-related deaths from occurring. Working with a marketing agency called DDB, Zouk, a popular nightclub in Singapore, installed a series of urinals that are able to monitor a patron's blood alcohol level and warn them if they're too drunk to drive. Read More >>