history
Second Handwritten Copy of the American Declaration of Independence Discovered in England

Harvard researchers have discovered a parchment manuscript of the Declaration of Independence at a small archive office in the United Kingdom. Only the second parchment copy known to exist, it contains several features that mark it as distinct from the original. Read More >>

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How to Build Giant Structures Using Soda Bottles and a 3D Printer

Reduce, re-use, and recycle are words to live by as we try to minimise humanity’s demand for our planet’s natural resources. But instead of sending your empty soda bottles off to be recycled, scientists from the Hasso Plattner Institute in Germany want you to build everything from chairs, to boats, to outdoor shelters with them. Read More >>

space
Astronaut Peggy Whitson Just Smashed Another Record

Last month, astronaut Peggy Whitson performed her eighth spacewalk outside the ISS, setting the record for most spacewalks by a woman. Today at 6:27am BST, she made history yet again by breaking astronaut Jeff Williams’ record for cumulative time in space by an American astronaut, which was 534 days, 2 hours and 48 minutes. Read More >>

climate change
The March for Science Has Spread From Pole-to-Pole

Rainy weather on the east coast of America didn't stop people from hitting the streets to march for science yesterday. But the conditions in Antarctica and the Arctic Circle were quite a bit more extreme and protests in the name of facts were still rocking those two far-flung locations. Read More >>

science
Report: Cancer Journal Retracts a Record Hundred and Seven Studies

Scientists don’t work in a vacuum. Their work should always come along with a rigorous review process to ensure their methods and results aren’t wild, misinterpreted, or outright made up. But what if you’ve found a way to fake your own review? Read More >>

space
Cassini Has Made Earth Feel Small, But Part of Something Bigger

Earth is exhausting — excruciatingly so, if you’re a young curmudgeon like me. At times, performing even the most mundane tasks, like commuting on a crowded, smelly subway car, feels like an Olympic marathon designed to test one’s patience. Space compels us because it forces us to think outside this myopic view of ourselves — not in a “Dust in the Wind” way, but in the sense that we’re tiny flecks of star stuff lucky to be members of something so vast and incredible. And in recent years, one of the greatest reminders of this is the volume of research and images sent back to Earth from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, which first entered Saturn’s system in 2004. Read More >>

science
Dr. Who Joins the March For Science in London

Governments may govern nationally, but scientists must work globally by requirement, as the folks who establish human truths based on evidence. So while scientists took to the streets in Washington D.C. yesterday, marches in 600 cities globally joined them. Read More >>

science
Here Are the Ways Large Asteroids Can Kill You, Ranked

Large asteroids definitely present one of the most colourful and chaotic possible apocalypses. Such an impact would cause quite a cinematic conclusion, combining a plague of wind, tsunamis, heat, and other terrors into a horrible death-fest. Honestly, count me in. Read More >>

science
Is This Art Gross?

Screw Rembrandt, Picasso and all that boring old guy paint-on-a-canvas stuff. The future of art is bacteria, ants, and the smell of sweat. Read More >>

science
Silence of the Lambs Would Be a Ton of Fun as a Romantic Comedy

Most of us know The Silence of the Lambs as that seemingly family-friendly film about an FBI agent trying to make a name for herself that our parents mistakenly let us watch when we were way to young to learn about cannibalism. But did you ever wonder what the horror movie would look like as a rom-com? Read More >>

space
Remarkable Image Shows a Martian Crater With NASA’s Garbage Still Inside

When NASA’s Opportunity rover landed on Mars in 2004, it settled at the bottom of a crater in an interplanetary hole-in-one shot that would make even a golf champion jealous. When the rover trundled out of its unexpected hole, it left behind its landing platform. Now, 13 years later, we’ve caught our best glimpse yet of this historic landing site and the crap NASA left behind. Read More >>

science
What the Hell is This Beautiful Thing?

Meet Steve, a newly discovered atmospheric phenomenon that’s so strange it still doesn’t have a formal scientific description, hence the placeholder name. Thanks to the work of aurora enthusiasts and atmospheric scientists, we’re now learning more about Steve, but many questions remain. Read More >>

history
These Rare Color Photos From the Second World War Are Incredible

A new book published by the Imperial War Museum features a rare collection of colour photos from World War II, some of which haven’t been seen in over 70 years. From P-51D Mustangs and Flying Fortresses through to anti-aircraft spotters and flame hurling tanks, these images cast the war in a vibrant new light. Read More >>

space
This Picture of Earth From Within Saturn’s Rings Will Make You Emotional

Sometimes, the majesty of the final frontier—a cold, unfeeling space—has the power to make our eyes misty. The images from NASA’s Cassini mission have often been able to do this, and since the spacecraft is dying soon, it makes the experience all the more emotional. Before it goes out in a blaze of glory, Cassini has been sending back some of the most incredible images of Saturn and its moons—but one of its latest from Saturn’s rings is especially spectacular. Read More >>