weather
Tokyo Is Testing a New System to Detect ‘Guerrilla’ Rain and Tornadoes Up to 30 Minutes in Advance

Officials in Tokyo are testing a new technology that utilises weather radar and terrestrial digital radio waves to “quickly and precisely predict torrential rain and tornadoes” up to 20 to 30 minutes in advance, the Mainichi reported on Sunday. Read More >>

science
It Looks Like There’s a Second, Bigger Impact Crater Under Greenland’s Ice

Scientists have spotted a potential asteroid crater in Greenland just 114 miles away from another one announced a few months ago. But the newest crater is even larger—it would be the 22nd largest on Earth. Read More >>

space
The Enduring Mystery of the Martian ‘Blueberries’ Discovered by Opportunity Rover

NASA has officially called an end to the historic Opportunity rover mission, ending a spectacular, 14-year adventure on the Red Planet. One of the rover’s most intriguing discoveries, however, came just two months after it landed, when it stumbled upon tiny objects bearing a startling resemblance to blueberries — the nature of which still divides scientists today. Read More >>

history
This 1920s Concept for a Drive-Through Supermarket Completely Failed

Today, getting your groceries delivered to your house is old news. But there once was a time when the most futuristic thing in food shopping was the car. Specifically, drive-in shopping like these stores from the 1920s. Read More >>

space
Neutron Star Collisions Could Reveal Mysterious Quark Matter

Scientists are dreaming up ways to probe the nature of the Universe’s smallest bits – quarks – by observing ultra-dense neutron stars slamming into each other. Read More >>

air pollution
Ingenious Student Project Uses Bacteria to Clean Filthy Underground Air

Remember when we found out just how disgusting the air on the London Underground is? Surprisingly, it seems the solution is bacteria. Read More >>

space
New NASA Mission Will Look Back at Billions of Years of Cosmic History

A newly approved NASA mission, called SPHEREx, will use a space-based observatory to study the early conditions of the Universe and hunt for the celestial ingredients required for life. Read More >>

science
Newly Discovered African Titanosaur Had a Distinctly Heart-Shaped Tailbone

Titanosaurs were the giants of the giants—four-legged behemoths that stomped around Cretaceous South America and Africa 100 million years ago. The discovery of a previously unknown titanosaur in Tanzania with a unique heart-shaped tailbone is adding to our knowledge of these enigmatic beasts, and how they lived and evolved on the African continent. Read More >>

robots
This Walking Robot Navigates Using the Sun, No GPS Required

Researchers in France are calling their six-legged creation the “AntBot.” This 9-inch robot doesn’t just skitter around like a desert ant, though—it also borrows their unique navigational skills. Read More >>

nuclear power
Remote-Controlled Probe Picks up Radioactive Debris at Fukushima for the First Time

Tepco, the state-owned operator of the badly damaged Fukushima nuclear plant, has conducted an important test in which a remote-controlled probe managed to grasp several small grains of radioactive debris, AFP reports. The successful operation marked an important achievement for the company as it prepares for a cleanup operation that could take decades. Read More >>

science
Rare Spider Fossil Preserves 100-Million-Year-Old Glowing Eyes

A new spider fossil discovery included a surprising find: remnants of reflective eye tissue. Read More >>

history
Famed WW2 Aircraft Carrier Torpedoed in 1942 Found Miles Deep in Pacific Ocean

After 77 years, the wreck of the USS Hornet has finally been found, lying more than three miles deep in South Pacific waters. The storied aircraft carrier—sunk by Japanese torpedoes in 1942 with the loss of 140 men— played a critical role during the Second World War, most famously in the Doolittle Raid and the Battle of Midway. Read More >>

climate change
Greenland’s Melt Will Drive Up Sea Levels…But Also Give Us Sand

Greenland is rapidly melting. Blame it on climate change. This is no good news, but a new paper points out an unexpected benefit as a result of all this lost ice: sand. Read More >>

science
Pumping Breast Milk Changes Its Microbiome

Until relatively recently, most researchers thought that breast milk was sterile. But it turns out that, like most other body parts and fluids, it’s teeming with bacteria. The composition of its microbiome varies based on a number of factors—including whether the milk was pumped, or fed to an infant directly from the breast, according to a study published this week in the journal Cell. Read More >>

science
2-Billion-Year-Old Squiggles Could Be the Earliest Evidence of a Mobile Life Form

The reported discovery of 2.1-billion-year-old fossilized track marks etched in sedimentary rock is pushing back the earliest evidence of self-propelled movement by an organism on Earth by a whopping 1.5 billion years. Read More >>