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Stunning Aerosol Visualisation Accidentally Captures the Ferocity of This Year’s Hurricane Season

A new simulation produced by NASA’s Data Visualisation Studio packs four months of swirling atmospheric activity into a two minute clip that reminds us how unrelenting this past hurricane season really was. Read More >>

science
The Potential of CRISPR Gene Editing, Explained in Five Minutes

CRISPR gene editing is big news in the science world - but cutting DNA isn't all it can do. Read More >>

science
Houseflies Are More Capable of Spreading Disease Than We Realised

It’s never a nice feeling to watch a fly land on your next bite of food, but as new research shows, you may be justified in wanting to throw that delicious morsel in the garbage. Read More >>

animals
Can You Find the Perfectly-Camouflaged Snow Leopard Hidden On This Mountainside?

There’s a good reason it’s so difficult for photographers and film crews to capture the elusive snow leopard in the wild. The animal’s not only a master of stealth, it also sports a patterned fur coat that turns it nearly invisible in its natural habitat. Can you find the big cat sneaking up on its prey in this amazing photo by wildlife photographer Inger Vandyke? Read More >>

science
Coffee Is Officially Good For You (Again)

The pendulum of scientific opinion swings pretty dramatically when it comes to the effect (if any) coffee has on our health. Read More >>

science
If You Transplant a Human Head, Where Do You Get the Body?

Two years ago, the controversial Italian neurosurgeon Sergio Canavero made a brazen announcement: In December 2017, for the first time in history, he would transplant a human head. Read More >>

science
Dolly the Sheep Didn’t Die Prematurely Because She Was a Clone

Dolly the Sheep made biotech history in 1996 when she became the first animal cloned from adult somatic cells. She lived to the age of seven, which is young for sheep, leading scientists to speculate that her premature death had something to do with her being a clone. New research now shows this wasn’t the case. Read More >>

science
It’s Still Not a Good Idea to Eat Raw Cookie Dough

For some, sneaking a mouthful of raw cookie dough while baking is an indelible—and certainly delicious—part of the process. But while we’ve been told to avoid dough containing raw eggs, a new investigation confirms that tainted raw flour was responsible for an E. coli outbreak in 2016—a finding that will surely test our temptation to lick the bottom of the bowl. Read More >>

science
Empowering The Next Generation of Women in STEM

Bringing coding to high schools across Sydney, Coder Academy is working to get girls interested (or at the very least, aware of) the opportunities that are available in STEM fields - before they begin to think about their university and career choices. Read More >>

science
Scientist Sleuths Used DNA to Track Spread of Superbug

When an outbreak occurs, in order to effectively figure out how to stop it, researchers typically try to figure out how it started. The answer to that question, though, can be elusive. And as so-called superbug infections have spread across hospitals, scientists and public health officials have subsequently struggled to understand how these pathogens spread. Read More >>

science
Confirmed: Lightning Causes Nuclear Reactions in the Sky

Lightning is nuts. It’s a supercharged bolt of electricity extending from the sky to the ground that can kill people. But it can also produce nuclear reactions, according to new research. Read More >>

science
Ghost Particles Detected on Far Side of Earth Bolsters Crucial Physics Theory

If we’re ever going to truly understand how our Universe works, we’ll need to take lots of different measurements, but measuring can be one of science’s most difficult tasks. How, for example, do scientists measure an invisible thing that passes directly through solid matter without stopping? The inventions scientists come up with to make this possible are often truly incredible—even if the measurements made are totally expected. Read More >>

space
Cassini Swan Song Image of Saturn Left Me Speechless

Planets and robots lack hearts and minds, but they’re especially good at impacting ours. In its last days before ending itself, human-built Cassini turned around and snapped this farewell mosaic image of Saturn. Its title: “Farewell to Saturn.” Read More >>

science
The US Department of Defence Is Developing Plants That Are Spies

The US Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency wants to bioengineer plants so that the military can turn foliage into spies. Read More >>

science
Could the Personalised Medicine Revolution Actually Slow Innovation? 

The promise of personalised medicine is a pretty big one: tailoring treatments to a patient’s genes, their environment or their lifestyle, the thinking goes, will result in treatments that are much more likely to work. The same disease can manifest differently in different people, so why treat patients with a one-size-fits-all-approach? Read More >>