animals
Elephant Seals Know When Their Opponents Are Talking Shit

Yelling at each other online is a beloved human tradition. Other animals like to shout at each other too, they just don’t have the luxury of a screen separating them. But of all the petty creatures in the animal kingdom, it turns out elephant seals might be most like humans when it comes to talking shit. Read More >>

wtf
‘It’s a Miracle’: Embalmer Says Salvador Dali’s Moustache ‘Still Intact’ After 28 Years in Grave

Decades after his death in 1989, painter Salvador Dalí is continuing to make art, or at the very least, something surreal. Last month, a Spanish judge ordered the artist’s body to be exhumed for a paternity suit filed by a television psychic. The fortune teller, Pilar Abel, claims she is Dalí’s daughter and has been fighting to get the artist’s DNA since at least 2007. Now that Dalí’s corpse has finally been exhumed, his embalmer is happy to report the artist’s signature moustache has remained perfectly coiffed. Read More >>

robotics
Incredible Self-Folding Robots Work Without Batteries or Wires

Inspired by the traditional Japanese art of origami, self-folding robots can go places and do things traditional robots cannot. A major drawback to these devices, however, has been the need to equip them with batteries or wires. Researchers from Harvard have found a new way to overcome this problem, by designing folding robots that can be controlled using a wireless magnetic field. Read More >>

space
NASA Captures Impossible Glimpse of Kuiper Belt Object Billions of Miles Away

In about a year and a half from now, the New Horizons Spacecraft will whizz past a distant Kuiper Belt object named 2014 MU69. This rocky relic of the ancient Solar System—which is located about four billion miles away—just passed in front of a distant star, resulting in one of the more extraordinary eclipses ever captured by scientists. Read More >>

space
Skip Astronaut Training and Explore the ISS Right Now in Google Street View

Sometime between your marine biologist and professional ninja phases, you probably dreamed of being an astronaut as a kid. But have you seen all the work that goes into actually becoming one? Save yourself years of G-force training and wearing onesies and just shortcut your way onto the International Space Station, which became available for tour through Google Maps’ Street View yesterday. Read More >>

space
Massive Tides Could Boost TRAPPIST-1’s Prospects For Life

Earlier this year, Earthlings rejoiced when scientists announced the discovery of three rocky exoplanets in the habitable zone of TRAPPIST-1, an “ultracool dwarf” star located just 39 light years away. Soon after, astronomers brought us back down Earth, pointing out that it might be hard for life to survive on a world in such a tight orbit around such a dim star. But the debate has now taken yet another delicious twist, this time, in favour of aliens. Read More >>

science
Genetically Engineering Nature Will Be Way More Complicated Than We Thought

For more than half a century, scientists have dreamed of harnessing an odd quirk of nature— “selfish genes,” which bypass the normal 50/50 laws of inheritance and force their way into offspring—to engineer entire species. A few years ago, the advent of the CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technology turned this science fictional concept into a dazzling potential reality, called a gene drive. But after all the hype, and fear of the technology’s misuse, scientists are now questioning whether gene drives will work at all. Read More >>

space
Priceless NASA Artefact Sold Against NASA’s Wishes

48 years ago yesterday, Apollo 11 landed on the Moon, an unsurpassed milestone in the history of human exploration. To celebrate, luxury auction house Sotheby’s launched a mission of its own: to sell the shit out of some priceless artefacts from the American and Soviet space programmes, including one that, uh, NASA didn’t really want to see sold. Read More >>

space
Rocket Launches Look Even Cooler From Space

We typically only get to see rocket launches from ground level, where the space-bound craft drifts further and further away from sight. But in this dramatic new video, we finally get to see what a rocket launch looks like from the perspective of space itself. Read More >>

science
Pushing Particles Forwards Might Make Them Go Backwards Because Quantum Physics Is Bonkers

You are very lucky that you ended up about the size that you are today, somewhere between one and ten feet tall and weighing somewhere between one and one thousand pounds. This is a very good size. Not to body shame, but if you were, say, a quadrillion times shorter and weighed a nonillion times less (that’s one followed by 30 zeros), that would be very inconvenient for you. Everything would be very inconvenient for you. Read More >>

science
Can Lasers Blast Away Those Weird Squiggles at the Corners of Your Vision?

You’re staring at the sky on a sunny day when you notice, in the corner of your eye, a transparent squiggle floating slowly across the blue. You try and focus on it, but it eludes your glance, refusing to be resolved. No matter where you look, the squiggle knows. Read More >>

food
Ingenious AI Converts Images of Food Into a List of Ingredients

Researchers at MIT have developed deep-learning algorithm that can compile a list of ingredients and even recommend recipes after looking at photos of food. The artificially intelligent system still needs some fine tuning, but this tool could eventually help us learn to cook, count calories, and track our eating habits. Read More >>

science
Why Does This Dumb Worm Live to Be So Damn Old?

Things just don’t seem to die in the deep ocean (well, except for humans). While rockfish around 100 feet below the surface live about 12 years, those living closer to 2500 feet down can live for 200 years. There’s a deep water coral that can apparently live for up to 4,000 years. But there’s one species that seems to live an especially long time, and could rank up there with the oldest: Escarpia laminata, some dumbass tubeworm. Read More >>

environment
The Staggering Amount of Plastic We’ve Produced—And What We’ve Done With It

Scientists have calculated the total amount of plastic ever made. Spoiler alert: it’s a lot. But what’s even more disturbing is where all this plastic is ending up. Read More >>

science
Lab-Grown Livers Might Save Lives Sooner Than You Think

Since at least the first time a man got on stage at a TED talk and 3D-printed a human kidney, the idea that one day we might simply grow new body parts to replace our old, out-of-service ones has existed in the collective consciousness as the pinnacle of biomedical achievement. But what if you didn’t actually have to grow a whole new organ to save someone’s life? Read More >>