science
Why These Bats Laugh in the Face of North America’s Most Venomous Scorpion

When pallid bats are stung by an Arizona bark scorpion, they shrug it off as if nothing even happened, which is odd considering this predatory arachnid is the most venomous scorpion in all of North America. New research explains how this unusual level of immunity is possible—a finding that could translate to an entirely new class of painkillers for humans. Read More >>

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The World’s Deadliest Scorpion Strike Is Even More Terrifying in Super-Slow Motion

It’s known as the “death stalker”—a four-inch-long predatory arachnid capable of whipping its tail at speeds reaching 51 inches per second. Footage shot with high-speed cameras shows how the death stalker and other scorpions use their deadly tails to ward off would-be predators and catch unsuspecting prey. Read More >>

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Watch a Scorpion Sting a Man in Excruciating Slow Motion

The beauty of slow motion is that it lets you see and analyse every little detail of anything in a much more digestible package. Explosions become a dance, athletic achievements become more thoughtful, life becomes even more interesting and idiotic behaviour gets ever more funny. Watching a guy get stung by a scorpion in slow motion? Yeah, that's hilarious. Read More >>

science
“Scorpion Skin” Armour Could Help Protect Machines Against Sand Damage

As anyone who's been to the beach can tell you, sand has an uncanny ability to work its way into the most obscene places. Amusing for people, sure, but for machines, sand is a killer — penetrating gears, clog pipes, and causing general havoc with moving parts. A new surface based on a scorpion's hide, however, could prevent that. Read More >>