equifax
Former Equifax Manager Gets Home Confinement for Insider Trading Amid Data Breach

A former Equifax manager who tried to profit off the company’s horrendous 2017 data breach with a little insider trading will spend eight months on home confinement, forfeit his ill-gotten gains, and pay an additional $50,000 (£38,365) in fines. Read More >>

passwords
How to Do Passwords Right in 2018

Even in a world of face unlocking and fingerprint scanning, we still haven’t escaped the password just yet. They’re still a necessity and they’re still annoying to remember. There are now numerous browser features, third-party tools, and even hardware dongles designed to help keep your login credentials safe and secure. Here’s how to make sure you’re doing passwords right in 2018. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Finally Admits That Its New Spy Equipment Can Spy on You

It sounded a little slippery last week, when Facebook announced Portal, a new voice-activated speaker and video chat gadget, and the company said that it would not use data collected through the device to target ads. It was, in fact, very slippery. Facebook just admitted that Portal is completely capable of collecting data about you and using that data to target ads. But don’t worry, Facebook probably won’t do this right away. Read More >>

privacy
‘Do Not Track,’ the Privacy Tool Used by Millions of People, Doesn’t Do Anything

When you go into the privacy settings on your browser, there’s a little option there to turn on the “Do Not Track” function, which will send an invisible request on your behalf to all the websites you visit telling them not to track you. A reasonable person might think that enabling it will stop a porn site from keeping track of what she watches, or keep Facebook from collecting the addresses of all the places she visits on the internet, or prevent third-party trackers she’s never heard of from following her from site to site. According to a recent survey by Forrester Research, a quarter of American adults use “Do Not Track” to protect their privacy. (Our own stats at Gizmodo Media Group show that 9% of visitors have it turned on.) We’ve got bad news for those millions of privacy-minded people, though: “Do Not Track” is like spray-on sunscreen, a product that makes you feel safe while doing little to actually protect you. Read More >>

privacy
MindBody Exposes Data Belonging to Millions of Fitness App Users

The fitness company behind popular performance-tracking app FitMetrix reportedly left the personal data of more than 100 million users exposed. Read More >>

phones
Investigators Told Not to Look at Phones With Face ID to Avoid Lock-Out: Report

It’s no secret that law enforcement often resorts to workarounds for Apple’s security features, but the Face ID technology of the iPhone X makes things tricky. According to a report from Motherboard, forensics company Elcomsoft is advising law enforcement to not even look at phones with Face ID. This is because with its Face ID feature enabled, failed attempts to get into the phone could lock investigators out by requiring a passcode that may be protected under the Fifth Amendment. Read More >>

science
Ancestry Sites Could Soon Expose Nearly Anyone’s Identity, Researchers Say

Genetic testing has helped plenty of people gain insight into their ancestry, and some services even help users find their long-lost relatives. But a new study published this week in Science suggests that the information uploaded to these services can be used to figure out your identity, regardless of whether you volunteered your DNA in the first place. Read More >>

security
Don’t Fall for This New Email Scam Threatening to Expose Your Porn Habits

If you received an email from “hackers” claiming they recorded you watching porn and will send all your data to your loved ones if you don’t promptly pay up, take a beat. It’s probably a scam. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Says Hackers Accessed Sensitive Personal Information on 29 Million Users

Late last month, Facebook disclosed a massive security vulnerability that it claimed affected some 50 million login tokens, but details were somewhat thin on its impact pending further investigation. In a blog post today, the results are in some ways better and worse. Read More >>

whatsapp
Nasty WhatsApp Bug Left Users Vulnerable to Attack by Simply Answering a Video Call

On Tuesday, a researcher for Google’s Project Zero security team published a report revealing how WhatsApp users could lose control of their account just by answering a video call from a bad actor. Read More >>

google
Google Not Sure Which Google+ Users Had Personal Data Exposed

Following a report Monday alleging that Google kept secret a data breach potentially impacting hundreds of thousands of former Google+ users, the company is offering only a meagre defence of why it kept silent for so long. Read More >>

security
Apple, Amazon Deny China Installed Tiny Spy Microchips on Their Servers, But We’re Still Freaked Out

In what could be the most important national security story of the decade, a new report alleges that China has been installing tiny microchips, roughly the size of a grain of rice, on the motherboards of countless servers imported into the U.S. Read More >>

security
Apple and Amazon Call BS on Chinese Spy Microchip Report

Hours after Bloomberg Businessweek claimed Apple and Amazon were two among many victims of an extreme Chinese espionage operation, the two companies have fired back with lengthy statements repeatedly denying Bloomberg’s report and calling the reporting itself into question. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Data Breach Means MPs are Giving Mark Zuckerberg a New Chance to Ignore Them

In case you haven't noticed, Facebook has just had to deal with a data breach. It's the latest in a long line of PR disasters for the company, and one that could lead to a £1.25 billion fine under the GDPR. The breach has also caused our own MPs to say some words about Mark Zuckerberg, even if he's just going to ignore everything they have to say. Read More >>

facebook
Facebook Could Face Up to £1.25 Billion Fine for Latest Hack Under the GDPR

Facebook’s stunning disclosure of a massive hack on Friday in which attackers gained access tokens to at least 50 million accounts – bypassing all security measures and potentially giving them full control of both profiles and linked apps – has already stirred threats of a $1.63 billion dollar fine in the European Union, according to the Wall Street Journal. Read More >>