security
Passwords to Access Over a Half Million Car Tracking Devices Leaked Online

We’ve seen a lot of data breaches this year: some big, some small, some that are dangerous, and some that are just embarrassing. But if we were to name one as the creepiest data breach of 2017, this leak of logins for car tracking devices might take the cake. Read More >>

security
The CCleaner Attack Was Worse Than We Knew

When Avast announced that 2.27 million people had downloaded a malware-riddled copy of its performance optimisation software CCleaner, it was initially believed that a second payload—that can control a system—was never delivered to victims. It’s now clear that wasn’t the case, and it appears the attackers may have been targeting tech firms for the purposes of industrial espionage. Read More >>

technology
Knightscope’s Family of Dystopian Robot Guards Just Grew by Two

If you’ve heard of Knightscope’s security robots, it was probably due to their high-profile failures: one would-be Robocop failed to detect a staircase and killed itself by driving into a water fountain, another ran over a toddler’s foot in a shopping mall. On Wednesday, Knightscope announced two new potential fuck-ups were joining the force: the K1 and the K5 buggy. Read More >>

gadgets
Nest’s New Security System Makes Me Feel Sad for Nest

Everybody seemed excited about Nest’s big event today. New products! Several of them! New direction! Much needed for a company plagued with security flaws, product defects, and loads of other problems. But the most innovative thing that Nest announced was an alarm. Literally, a box that makes a loud noise. It’s called the Nest Guard, and it does not feel like a comeback. Read More >>

security
Government Wants Tech Giants to Auto-Delete Terror Content

Theresa May has said something not to do with Brexit for once, with the PM using a speech at the United Nations to ask today's tech giants and social media kingpins to do more to automatically filter out terrorist material. Read More >>

data breach
Viacom Leak May Have Exposed Hundreds of Digital Properties—Paramount Pictures, Comedy Central, MTV, and More

An Amazon server containing roughly a gigabyte’s worth of credentials and configuration files belonging to behemoth media conglomerate Viacom were discovered online and unsecured, according to UpGuard, a California-based “cyber resiliency” firm. A security researcher working for the company discovered the server flapping in the wind last month—without so much as a password between it and the public web. Read More >>

security
How to Stop Pirate Bay and Other Sites From Hijacking Your CPU to Mine Cryptocoins

This past weekend, the popular torrenting site The Pirate Bay caught some flak for testing out a new system that used visitors’ CPU power to generate cryptocurrency profits for itself. This tactic has been around for years, but the high profile implementation signals that it’s probably time to start blocking this crap. Here’s how it’s done. Read More >>

security
Do These 7 Dead Simple Safety Checks to Make Sure Your Accounts and Devices Are Safe

It’s a hostile world out there and your personal data is constantly being targeted from a whole host of angles. While you can’t control the shoddy security practises of major corporations, you can minimise the risk of your private information getting into the wrong hands. Just as you do regular maintenance on your car, or home, and you go to the doctor just for a check-up, there are little habits you should form to keep your online life as safe and healthy as possible. Here are the seven we do regularly. Read More >>

security
Manchester’s Police Force is Still Using Windows XP

I can't even remember the last time I used Windows XP, so it's hard to imagine that many people — and important people with important jobs at that — still use it every day. Greater Manchester Police is among those, revealing that 20 per cent of its PCs (more than 1,500 in total) still run on Windows XP. Read More >>

security
The Fight Over DRM Standards for Streaming Video Is Over and Big Business Won

A fight over the future of video streaming has been brewing for years—and it finally came to a head today, with a major electronic privacy organisation bowing out of the consortium that sets standards for the web. Read More >>

security
Your Copy of Avast’s ‘PC Cleaner’ CCleaner Could Be Full of Malware, Update Now

According to its parent company Avast, more than 130 million people use the performance optimisation software CCleaner. And today all of those people need to be sure they’ve installed the latest update because some nasty malware has managed to make it into one of the builds. Read More >>

piracy
The Pirate Bay Added a CPU-Hijacking Bitcoin Miner to Some Pages

File-sharing websites are not exactly known for their sterling reputation, though a few such as famed torrent site the Pirate Bay have been around for long enough while generally avoiding shady behaviour they’ve acquired a certain cache with the internet community. Read More >>

youtube
Journalist Nearly Banned From YouTube and Gmail For Posting Al-Qaeda Videos From Chelsea Manning Trial

YouTube’s latest push to ban terrorist propaganda across its ubiquitous video platform is getting off to a rough start. Earlier this week, noted investigative reporter and researcher Alexa O’Brien woke to find that not only had she been permanently banned from YouTube, but that her Gmail and Google Drive accounts had been suspended as well. She would later learn that a reviewer who works for Google had mistakenly identified her channel, in the words of a YouTube representative, as “being dedicated to terrorist propaganda.” Read More >>

security
Citing Russian Ties, America Boots Kaspersky Software From Government Agencies

American government agencies are now banned from using software created by the Russian cybersecurity firm Kaspersky Lab and will have to begin removing Kaspersky products from their systems within three months, the US Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced recently. Read More >>

ai
Hackers Have Already Started to Weaponise Artificial Intelligence

Last year, two data scientists from security firm ZeroFOX conducted an experiment to see who was better at getting Twitter users to click on malicious links, humans or an artificial intelligence. The researchers taught an AI to study the behavior of social network users, and then design and implement its own phishing bait. In tests, the artificial hacker was substantially better than its human competitors, composing and distributing more phishing tweets than humans, and with a substantially better conversion rate. Read More >>