chatroom
What Was Your First Smartphone?

Smartphones were once a boutique item, but now they're practically essential. Still, we all remember a time before smartphones — at least, the time before we got our first one. Read More >>

cars
Ford Puts Voice-Activated IFTTT in Your Dashboard

IFTTT is a simple yet powerful way to put your digital stuff to work making your life easier, automatically. Now, thanks to a collaboration with Automatic, drivers of some 2011 or newer Ford vehicles can summon IFTTT with the push of a steering-wheel button. Read More >>

chatroom
What’s The Earliest Trace Of Yourself You Can Still Find Online?

The internet is so deeply woven into our everyday lives, we hardly think about it anymore. We've all been posting, commenting, liking, and sharing for at least a decade. In the process, we've all left a long digital trail. What's the oldest remnant of your online life that you can still find? Read More >>

science
The World’s First Handheld DNA Sequencer is a Genetics Lab In a Box

DNA sequencing is crucial for identifying and tracking nasty viruses like E. coli and the flu. But current tabletop-size DNA sequencing machines aren't readily portable. Researchers at the University of Otago in New Zealand have a solution in a brick-sized DNA sequencer that connects wirelessly to a smartphone or laptop. Read More >>

chatroom
What’s the Most Embarrassing Tech Mistake You’ve Ever Made?

Technology is great. The devices we use give us near-infinite powers to create, learn, and communicate worldwide. But sometimes, we have misfires. Operator errors. Lapses of judgment that zip instantly to all corners of the digital world. Come, tell us your tales of e-embarrassment. Read More >>

science
UV-Powered Blood Test Could Make Universal Cancer Detection Possible

Early detection is the best tool to fight cancer, but biopsies can be painful and inconclusive. New research shows a simple blood test can detect cancers by blasting white blood cells with UV and seeing how they respond. Painless, universal cancer detection could be a drop of blood away. Read More >>

health
A Nanotech-Powered AIDS-Killing Condom is Closer than Ever

Correctly used, condoms do a damn good job of preventing STDs (and pregnancy!). But nobody's gonna say no to an improvement that ups those odds. Say, a condom coated in antiviral gel that kills up to 99.9 per cent of HIV, genital herpes, and human papillomavirus. Read More >>

science
Your Skin Has a Sense of Smell, and Sandalwood Aroma Makes it Heal

Ready for some weird science? Some of the same olfactory sensing equipment that give your nose its sense of smell can be found in your skin cells. In other words, your skin has a sense of smell. And researchers have just figured out that your skin loves the scent of sandalwood—in fact, the aroma revs up your skin's natural healing abilities. Read More >>

watch this
The Surprising Science in a Single Drop of Regular Ol’ Tap Water

Tap water: we drink it, we bathe in it, we wash our clothes and dishes with it, and we cook with it. We probably take it for granted. But delivering clean, safe water to every kitchen and bathroom in America is no easy task, as Wired explains in this eye-opening little explanation into the secret life of tap water. Read More >>

security
American Airport Security TSA is on the Lookout For Electronics That Won’t Turn On

The Transportation Security Administration, the wand-waving dudes on the other side of the airport security line when we travel to the States, have a new target: mobile phones and other electronics that won't power up. At certain airports, if your device won't turn on, it—and maybe you—won't get on that plane. Read More >>

drugs
A Mutant Cocaine-Eating Enzyme Could Cure Addiction and Overdoses

Ready for some weird science? Certain bacteria found in the dirt near coca plants are powered by an enzyme that eats cocaine. Unfortunately, the enzyme breaks down quickly at body temperature, meaning it can't be used to treat human overdoses or addiction. Now, though, researchers have designed a version that can survive body temps—and more than doubles its cocaine appetite. Read More >>

google
New Android Feature Wakes You Up for Your Bus or Train Stop

Android Police just discovered a cool new Google Now feature: when you're taking public transportation, you can set an alarm to make sure you don't sleep through your stop. No more waking up stranded at the end of the line! Read More >>

chatroom
What Would Change if Politicians Wrote Laws Based on Internet Polls?

A new American political party, designed by software devs and engineers, is joining the race in California. If elected, PlaceAVote's Congressional candidates vow to decide on every bill based on the majority vote of their constituents—as measured via online polling. Could that sort of direct, digital democracy improve how politics works? Would it make governments more dysfunctional? (Is the latter even possible?) Read More >>

uncategorized
Shutterstock is Now Offering Stock Music

Shutterstock, the subscription-based stock photo company behind a lot of the generic (or weird) stock photography you see online, is now offering stock music for video producers and the like. [Shutterstock via Mashable] Read More >>

booze
Just Like Stupid Humans, Fish Get Cocky When They’re Drunk

We humans love to use booze as liquid courage, but we're not the only ones who feel extra capable after a few swigs. New research shows that a tipsy zebra fish will swim faster than the sober fish in its school—like a big showoff. And just like humans, the sober fish will speed up rather than be bested by a drunkard. Humans: basically, we're just big fish. Read More >>