sleep
Checking Your Phone at Night Won’t Necessarily Throw Off Your Internal Clock, Mouse Study Finds

People who only occasionally fall down an internet rabbit hole on their smartphones late at night might be able to rest easier – at least according to the results of a new study in mice. Researchers found that short bursts of light exposure at night won’t necessarily disrupt your internal clock, including sleep habits. Read More >>

robots
This Sleep Robot Is Only Worth it if You’re Tired and Alone

If you’ve suffered the throes of chronic insomnia, you’ll do almost anything to fall asleep. Pills, guided meditation apps, vigorous exercise, melatonin, screen dimmers, aromatherapy diffusers, sleep tracking via fitness tracker, smart beds, bedtime calculators—at some point or another, I’ve tried them all and probably spent an absurd amount of money in the pursuit of a restful night. So what’s the harm in trying an expensive bean-shaped cuddle robot meant to help you fall asleep faster? Read More >>

science
No Screen Time for Kids Under 2, WHO Says

The World Health Organisation is coming out strong against letting young kids watch TV or play with smartphones, and is pushing parents to help their kids stay active and get enough sleep. Read More >>

animals
Here is an Important Scientific Study About How Animals Relax

Scientists have determined that the way an animal rests – reclining on its back, sprawling on its belly, standing up, or sitting, is determined by primarily by its size. But more importantly, the study authors have provided a large selection of images of animals luxuriating in various ways, and they are delightful. Read More >>

science
Parents Can Expect Less Sleep for the First Six Years of Their Child’s Life

Mums and dads shouldn’t expect their sleep habits to bounce back to the way they were before kids for at least the first six years of their child’s life, according to a new long-term study involving nearly 5,000 parents. Read More >>

health
US Experiment Shows Later School Start Times Can Help Teens Get More Sleep

Here’s some refreshing good news, courtesy of a new study released last week in Science Advances. Teens in Seattle, US, got more sleep, had better punctuality, and even did better in class after schools across the area delayed their start times by about an hour. Read More >>

dreams
Why Do We Remember Some Dreams but Not Others?

If you’ve ever woken up on the brink of a heart attack, drenched in sweat and convinced you’ll never live down the shame of sprinting nude through downtown Pittsburgh, you know that some dreams are more memorable than others. Most dreams, in fact, seem totally unmemorable – at least in the sense that we can’t remember them. And yet every now and then a dream will linger into breakfast and well into the day, or month, or year – will become a memory like any other. Read More >>

giz asks
How Much Sleep Is Too Much Sleep?

An entire industry—with its own spokespeople, podcasts, best-sellers, retreats, truisms, etc—has sprung up around sleep. Give or take a contrarian or two, the message of most of this stuff seems to be that sleep is good, and that if you’re not sleeping seven or eight hours a night, you should be. And since you’re probably not sleeping seven or eight hours a night—since, in all likelihood, you can barely focus on this sentence, having sacrificed one or two or all of your needed eight hours to soothing your newborn, or streaming bad TV, or snorting cocaine—what all this stuff is really saying is: sleep more. Read More >>

science
Sleep-Deprived People May Infect You With Loneliness

Not getting enough or the right kind of sleep is notoriously bad for physical health. But a new study out of the University of California, Berkeley suggests that poor sleep can be a nightmare for our social lives too. It just might turn us into lonely outcasts, capable of spreading our misery to others. Read More >>

audio
Bose Has a Pricey Winner With Its Sleep-Friendly Earbuds

Sleeping on the weekends is rough. My flat is across the street from a bar that grows only louder and more crowded in the height of summer, so a good Saturday night snooze is usually out of the question. Raucous drinkers, the thump of the bass from the building, and the sound of my air conditioner create a cacophony nearly impossible to ignore. I’m not a fan. But Bose thinks its “Sleepbuds,” white noise masking earbuds designed to be worn during sleep (coming to the UK this autumn), can help alleviate the issue without resorting to the tried and true noise-cancelling technology used in some of its headphones. I get the appeal, but can a £229 white noise generator jammed in my ear canal really solve my sleeping problems? Read More >>

science
The Strange Connection Between Opioid Addiction and Narcolepsy Might Help Us Treat Both

A new study could revive an abandoned theory about how to treat narcolepsy, the thus-far incurable disorder that makes people chronically sleepy. And it could also provide a new lead on how to treat drug addiction. Read More >>

science
Smartphones and Video Games May Make Teens Sadder Because of How They Affect Sleep

As smartphones and other highly portable devices have become omnipresent, some researchers and many parents have begun to worry about the mental health risks of excessive screen time on kids and teens. New research presented this week doesn’t debunk a link between technology and depression, but it could sharpen the reasons why it exists. Rather than social isolation or any direct effects on the brain, the study’s findings suggest, it’s the lack of sleep caused by web-surfing or gaming that’s most to blame. Read More >>

animals
Chimp Beds Are Way Less Filthy Than Human Beds

In a twist that rivals cinema’s best, a new study published Tuesday in Royal Society Open Science suggests a horrible truth: we’ve been the damn dirty apes all along. It found that beds made by one of our closest primate relatives, chimpanzees, contain little personal filth, meaning germs and parasites from their own body, and certainly much less filth than what’s typically seen in human homes and beds. Read More >>

science
People Who Like to Stay up Later Have a Higher Chance of Early Death, Study Finds

Night owls may be more fun at parties, but a preference for staying out late may come with some serious drawbacks, suggests a new study published this week in Chronobiology International. Namely, it might increase your chances of dying early. Read More >>

health
Forcing People to Get Up Early Sort of Kills Them a Bit

Researchers looking into human sleep patterns have found that some people really shouldn't be made to start work early, as forcing night people to become morning people appears to raise their chances of dying prematurely by 10 per cent. Read More >>