science
Amazing Spider Silk Continues to Surprise Scientists

We already know that spider silk is something of a wonder material, but scientists are still discovering more awesome things that it can do. An international team of researchers has found that spider silk shares a useful property with semiconductors—except rather than exploiting this to manipulate electrons, it can be used to manipulate sound and heat. Read More >>

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The US Army Wants to Make Body Armour Out of Genetically Engineered Spider Silk

We’ve always wanted body armour to look less like a chunky Kevlar vest and more like a sleek superhero suit. The US Army wants that too, enough so that it just awarded a $100,000 (£75,446) contract to a company to see if its genetically engineered spider silk can be used for body armour. Read More >>

science
‘Chopsticks of Light’ Reveal What Makes Spider Silk So Stretchy

Spider silk is nature’s Kevlar. It’s stronger than steel, it’s waterproof, and you can stretch it as much as 30 to 40 per cent before it snaps. Now biophysicists at Johns Hopkins University think they know the secret to spider silk’s remarkable elasticity: protein threads that serve as stretchy “superstrings.” The researchers describe their work in a recent paper in the journal Nano Letters. Read More >>

science
Scientists Are Spinning Spider Silk Without The Spiders

Spider silk is often touted as a wonder material that’ll soon weave its way into everything from body armour to replacement hearts. But we can only squeeze so much of the stuff out of our eight-legged friends, which is why scientists and entrepreneurs are working hard to reproduce it artificially. Read More >>

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This Spider Catches Prey With a Web of Electrically Charged Silk 

Not all spider silk is created equal. Some spiders spin webs of wet, sticky silk. Others like the Uloborus spider have fluffy webs made of nanoscale filaments. But those fluffy webs are just as good at catching prey, likely thanks to their electrostatic charge. Read More >>