science
Newly Discovered Widow Spider Lays Bright Purple Eggs

Scientists have discovered a spider living in South Africa that’s truly a sight to behold. The arachnids feature a scarlet, exclamation mark-shaped blotch on their backs, along with a white squiggle pattern that creates the vague shape of a human face, mouth agape in horror. Read More >>

science
Gollum-Like Daddy Long-Legs Discovered in the Bowels of the Earth

Daddy long-legs – spider-like arachnids technically known as “harvestmen” – are already plenty unnerving, with their too-long-to-be-real limbs, jerky movements, and habit of clustering into a horrible, hairy mass. But researchers have recently unveiled a variety of harvestman totally new to science, and it cranks the creepy up to 11. Read More >>

science
Hurricanes and Climate Change Might Make Spiders More Aggressive

Hurricanes could make spider colonies more aggressive over time, according to a new paper. Let’s add “avoiding extra-evil spider colonies” to our list of reasons to fight climate change, please and thanks. Read More >>

animals
Spider Eating a Pygmy Possum Is Obviously Australian

That’s a photo of a huntsman spider eating a pygmy possum. Yikes! Read More >>

science
Time Now for Some Gnarly Photos of Spiders Eating Other Animals

Spiders are creepy even at the best of times, but new photos taken from the Amazon rainforest put these predatory creatures in an even more fearsome light: as they’re chomping down on animals of unusual sizes. Read More >>

science
New Tarantula Species Has Big, Weird, Floppy Horn

Tarantulas generally stick to a pretty predictable body plan – eight legs, long fangs, usually fuzzy. But a newly-described species of tarantula in the southern African country of Angola has thrown scientists a big curve ball. The tarantula is about as weird as it gets for spiders, sporting a long, pliable, droopy “horn” on its back, and no one’s sure what it’s even for. Read More >>

watch this
Imagine Walking Into This Wall of Spiders and Never Sleep Again

You know what’s more terrifying than spiders creeping into your home in the middle of the night? Spiders in the freaking skies, man. Read More >>

science
Spider Mothers Produce Milk for Their Young, Incredible New Study Shows

Jumping spider mothers provide milk to their spiderlings far into development, according to a new study that might turn your understanding of invertebrate parenting on its head. Read More >>

science
Infected ‘Zombie Spiders’ Forced to Build Incubation Chambers for Their Parasitic Overlords

Parasites that control the behaviour of their hosts for their own benefit are a well-documented natural phenomenon, but the discovery of a previously unknown relationship between a parasitic wasp and a social spider is particularly upsetting. Read More >>

fires
Stop Using Blowtorches to Kill Spiders in Your House

While this should seemingly go without saying, it turns out that “kill it with fire” is not a great idea when it comes to ridding your home of pests. Nonetheless, there is no shortage of failed cases of people attempting to kill spiders or insects with blowtorches, and it doesn’t often end well. Read More >>

insects
Tarantulas on the Loose in Derbyshire

Some weird person abandoned a batch of massive imported spiders in a car park in Derbyshire, with onlookers saying the babies remained in the pots to be captured -- but warning that the adult pair "scuttled away." Read More >>

science
New Translucent Spider Discovered Living in Muddy Cave in America

Scientists have discovered a new species of sheet-weaving spider, and it only dwells in one cave in the US state of Indiana. As its name suggests, this spider spins flat, tightly-woven, horizontal webs. There are thousands of species of sheet-weavers, and you’ve probably walked through one of their webs by accident some point. Read More >>

science
Watch Tiny Crab Spiders Take Flight With 10-Foot Silk Parachutes

If you’re arachnophobic, I hate to tell you this, but spiders can fly. Read More >>

science
Mad Scientists Taught a Predatory Spider to Jump for Them and Now We’re All Probably Doomed

Scientists at the University of Manchester trained a spider named Kim to jump for them, then recorded her leaps on high-speed cameras. But don’t worry, their research—published Tuesday in Scientific Reports—isn’t meant for anything nefarious. Nah, they just want to learn how to build a whole legion of jumping spider-robots. Read More >>

spiders
Male Brown Widow Spiders Prefer Cannibalistic Older Females for No Apparent Reason

Scientists in Israel have observed a strange behaviour among brown widow spiders: When given the choice, the males of this species prefer to have sex with older females even though they’re less likely to bear offspring. More problematically, these older females are also more inclined to devour their partners after mating, making the males’ preference all the more baffling. Read More >>