gaming
I Played Doom on a Chromebook

There’s a lot we still don’t know about Google’s forthcoming streaming game service Stadia, and we won’t know some of it until it’s available in the wild. But in a controlled demo of Stadia at E3, I was treated to a solid experience, as well as some fresh information about how the company plans to deliver Stadia to people with bad internet. And even better, I played the latest and greatest Doom right on a Pixelbook. No weird hacks. No fussy apps. Just me and a whole bunch of monsters on Mars. Read More >>

gaming
Why Seemingly Every Company Is Launching a Gaming Subscription Now

Much in the way that streaming has too many damn options now, gaming services are flooding the market as companies increasingly position themselves to compete for attention over singular domination of an entertainment medium. Netflix, for example, disclosed in an earnings report earlier this year that it viewed itself as competing with “Fortnite more than HBO.” If a recent survey is to be believed, they may be on to something. Read More >>

gaming
Google Stadia Is Coming: Games, Latency, Crossplay, Speed Requirements, and More

YouTube is rightfully under fire this week, but that’s not stopping Google from finally giving us all the details about its next big streaming service. Stadia, Google’s big play to define the next epoch of gaming, was officially announced back in March, but the March event was frustratingly devoid of details. Now we have them. Read More >>

gaming
You’ll Be Able to Use an Xbox Adaptive Controller With Google Stadia

Earlier this week, Google revealed Stadia, a platform which aims to allow game streaming on any device with a Chrome browser. A lot of the presentation focused on the speed of games booting up, or the convenience of playing with any controller on any device, but in among the big reveals was a small but vitally important announcement about controllers. Read More >>

google
How Will Google Overcome Stadia’s Biggest Obstacle?

The problem with a gaming platform that relies entirely on the internet is that it relies on the internet. Stadia, Google’s new streaming game platform, will require that users have a robust internet connection to work, and that’s a big problem. “It’s what has plagued game streaming from the beginning,” said Pat Moorhead, Principal Analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy. A game streaming service simply can’t work if there’s lag. And in America, there’s a lot of lag. Read More >>

google
Google Made Chromecast Cool Again

At Gizmodo, there are few things more rewarding than eating your own words. So here I am. It’s been six months since I reviewed the apparently boring new Google Chromecast, a gadget I said “falls short” and called “a bummer.” New Google has effectively turned the Chromecast into the video game console of the future. This is me eating my own words. Read More >>

google
Stadia Will Need “Approximately 25 Mbps” Internet Speeds, According to Google Boss

Last night, Google lifted the lid on its big, secret video game project: Stadia, a streaming service designed to bring the biggest games to anyone, regardless of the device they're using – as long as it has a Chrome browser or it supports Chromecast Read More >>

google
How Much Would You Pay for a Holy Grail Google Stadia Subscription?

Yesterday was the big coming out party for Stadia, Google’s upcoming game streaming platform that promises to let you play games over the internet on practically any device, and hopefully lag-free. Read More >>

gaming
Google Stadia’s Only Hardware Is This Special Controller

Today, Google announced its new Stadia game streaming platform that lets gamers play games on pretty much anything with an internet connection. Laptops, desktops, phones, and even TVs with a Chromecast Ultra attached are all supported. That means there’s no need to go out and buy a new console to get access to Stadia, but surely, Stadia must have some sort of proprietary hardware right? Read More >>

architecture
This Awe-Inspiring Stadium is Now the Biggest Dome in the World

If huge spaces freak you out (looking at you, agoraphobes), look away now. Singapore's huge new stadium, SportsHub, just clinched the title for the largest free-spanning dome structure ever built—stretching more than 1,010 feet across at its widest point. Read More >>

architecture
Three World Cup Stadia That are Actually Good for Brazil

The 12 stadia currently seeing World Cup action are not created equal. The dozen venues for the games are a mix of something old, something new, something temporary that will be taken down after the last goal is kicked. And not all of them have turned out to deliver the hopes and dreams promised (a few aren't even finished). Read More >>