gaming
Stadia’s Unrealised Potential Is Why Baldur’s Gate 3 Developers Are Obsessed With It

Earlier this week, the developer behind Baldur’s Gate 3, Larian Studios, invited press to watch hours of gameplay in which a developer died over and over again in the difficult isometric RPG based on Dungeons and Dragons. I went because the Baldur’s Gate series is one of my absolute favourite ever made – and also because the third in the series is one of the highest-profile games coming to Stadia this year, and I’m on a quest to understand the cloud gaming platform (and its slowly-growing roster of rivals). Read More >>

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Stadia Finally On Phones Not Made By Google, But Still No iOS Support

Google Stadia is finally getting an upgrade...sort of. Google’s cloud gaming service is coming to a whole new slew of phones and for once they’re not Google-made ones. Read More >>

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Stadia Is a Glimpse Into the Future – But Maybe Not Yours or Google’s

When Stadia works perfectly, it feels like the future of gaming. Laptop, phone and TV: Google’s new game streaming service works across all three with the press of a button or two. The simple controller knows what to connect to and does so with ease. With Stadia, you can slip into a game typically found on a PC or console using almost any device. It makes you wonder why we’ve tethered ourselves to hardware for so long when the Internet can give us all of that power at a considerably lower cost (and smaller energy bill). The problem is that Stadia rarely works perfectly. Instead, it offers us a glimmer of the future before crashing back down into the muddy present. Read More >>

gaming
We Finally Know What Games Are Launching With Stadia

The launch of Stadia is only a week away, so it’s extremely surprising that we’re only learning about its launch titles now – after pre-orders have already happened. But given the list of games available maybe it makes sense that Google held off so long. Read More >>

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Everything Google Announced Today

In a somewhat unconventional spectacle that included a fireside chat about the company’s environmental initiatives and photographer Annie Leibovitz dropping by to talk about smartphones, Google’s Pixel 4 event in New York today included few surprises, and at times, even fewer details on its new hardware. Read More >>

gaming
Google Stadia is Going to Launch on November 19th

Google has been bigging up its Stadia streaming system for a while now, but today it finally announced when the service will go live on 19th November. Read More >>

gaming
Google Suggests Stadia Will Somehow Achieve ‘Negative Latency,’ Perhaps Via Predictive Button Input

Google sure has some bold plans for its Stadia game streaming service: “negative latency.” Read More >>

gaming
Game Subscriptions Have Never Been Cheaper

With Google’s Stadia cloud based gaming service arriving sometime next month with a £9/month subscription fee, the competition is already preparing for an all out war this holiday season. Today Sony announced it’s officially dropped the price of PlayStation Now from £13/month to £9, but with even more competition looming, you can probably expect further discounts. Read More >>

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Leaked Slide Shows Google to Add Stadia Support, Launch ‘Hero Device’ for Android TV in 2020

Google is planning on rolling out a bevy of new features for its Android TV platform in the coming years, including its much-awaited Stadia game streaming service, according to a leak on XDA Developers. Read More >>

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All the News and Key Details From Google Stadia Chief’s AMA

Google’s big play at making game streaming a reality—Stadia—is slated to go live sometime in November. That’s less than four months away, so to help answers questions and provide more info about Google’s upcoming game streaming platform, Stadia’s director of product Andey Doronichev hosted an AMA (Ask Me Anything) over on the Stadia subreddit. Read More >>

gaming
I Played Doom on a Chromebook

There’s a lot we still don’t know about Google’s forthcoming streaming game service Stadia, and we won’t know some of it until it’s available in the wild. But in a controlled demo of Stadia at E3, I was treated to a solid experience, as well as some fresh information about how the company plans to deliver Stadia to people with bad internet. And even better, I played the latest and greatest Doom right on a Pixelbook. No weird hacks. No fussy apps. Just me and a whole bunch of monsters on Mars. Read More >>

gaming
Why Seemingly Every Company Is Launching a Gaming Subscription Now

Much in the way that streaming has too many damn options now, gaming services are flooding the market as companies increasingly position themselves to compete for attention over singular domination of an entertainment medium. Netflix, for example, disclosed in an earnings report earlier this year that it viewed itself as competing with “Fortnite more than HBO.” If a recent survey is to be believed, they may be on to something. Read More >>

gaming
Google Stadia Is Coming: Games, Latency, Crossplay, Speed Requirements, and More

YouTube is rightfully under fire this week, but that’s not stopping Google from finally giving us all the details about its next big streaming service. Stadia, Google’s big play to define the next epoch of gaming, was officially announced back in March, but the March event was frustratingly devoid of details. Now we have them. Read More >>

gaming
You’ll Be Able to Use an Xbox Adaptive Controller With Google Stadia

Earlier this week, Google revealed Stadia, a platform which aims to allow game streaming on any device with a Chrome browser. A lot of the presentation focused on the speed of games booting up, or the convenience of playing with any controller on any device, but in among the big reveals was a small but vitally important announcement about controllers. Read More >>

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How Will Google Overcome Stadia’s Biggest Obstacle?

The problem with a gaming platform that relies entirely on the internet is that it relies on the internet. Stadia, Google’s new streaming game platform, will require that users have a robust internet connection to work, and that’s a big problem. “It’s what has plagued game streaming from the beginning,” said Pat Moorhead, Principal Analyst at Moor Insights & Strategy. A game streaming service simply can’t work if there’s lag. And in America, there’s a lot of lag. Read More >>